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Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

The word "fraught," when used alone, is fraught with questions. At least, for some speakers of English.

A couple of listeners have written to us recently, wanting to know if "fraught" can stand on its own. For example, "The situation is now fraught."

Both listeners were under the impression that the word "fraught" should be used with "with," as in, "I was fraught with emotion."


Detroit Institute of Arts
Maia C/Flickr

The Detroit Institute of Arts is asking officials in Macomb, Oakland, and Wayne County to put a renewal of the museum’s millage on the March 2020 ballot. This request comes earlier than expected: the millage was first passed in 2012, and it was not set to lapse until 2022.


 

 

clock
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

"Spring forward. Fall back." That's how we do daylight saving time. Having run around last weekend turning all the house and car clocks back one hour, we got to wondering: How'd we ever wind up with this thing called “daylight saving time” in the first place?

A record on a turntable.
Unsplash

Local Spins editor and publisher John Sinkevics joined Stateside to share some of the most exciting new music coming out of West Michigan this month. What unites his artist picks this time around, Sinkevics said, are the “compelling stories” they each bring to their music. 

illustration of kids smiling
Rachelle Baker for Michigan Radio

Do you remember how you saw the world when you were a kid, before the outside world told you what to think? Before you learned how to categorize other people, and how other people categorize you?

What if we could all see the world through a child’s eyes?

"In the meantime" is a good phrase to use when you're talking about the time between two events. But can you leave out "in the" and just say "meantime?"

A listener named Keisha Nelson tells us that that recently, she's both read and heard "meantime" used on its own.

Katie Raymond / Michigan Radio

Though it’s still *technically* still fall until December 21, our fall bracket has come to close. There are many things that feel so quintessentially autumn, so we asked our listeners to vote on their favorite fall essentials. And boy did you guys answer. 

person holding a box bursting with flowers in front of their head
Arnold Hong for Michigan Radio

I·den·ti·ty /ˌīˈden(t)ədē/

Noun: The fact of being who or what a person or thing is.

What shapes your identity? Your upbringing and experiences? The things you’ve learned about yourself and the world around you? The stuff people tell you about yourself?

Author photo and photo of a white farm house
Courtesy of Mission Point Press

After working as a correspondent for Time magazine in Europe and South America in the late 1960s and early 1970s, Charles Eisendrath came to Ann Arbor.

For 30 years, he directed the University of Michigan's Knight-Wallace Fellowships, a program for journalists. 

But his love of Michigan began further north.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

When I walked in, I could see a bottle of rye on the counter. “I can't think that this is going to go badly,” I said to Tammy Coxen of Tammy’s Tastings.

“We do both like rye,” she laughed. The name of the cocktail she was getting ready to mix is The Long Arm of the Law.

Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

From Mackinac Island to Michigan’s First State Prison in Jackson, the Great Lakes state has a lot to offer when it comes to spooky tales and local lore.

With Halloween on the horizon, here are five hauntingly interesting places in Michigan you may want to explore - if you’re brave enough.

Fall music so good, it tastes like pie

Oct 23, 2019
Katie Raymond / Michigan Radio

The temperatures have been waffling between 70 and 40 degrees, so you know what that means, Michigan — it's fall. In the spirit of the blustery winds that are whisking us indoors, we've curated a playlist that will simultaneously put you at ease while keeping you on your toes. 

Same Same Different: Find Your People

Oct 21, 2019
illustration of three women standing together
Paulette Parker for Michigan Radio

Where do you feel like you belong?

The question of where do we fit in is one we all face at some point. And some people have an easier time answering it than others.

Unless you've managed to avoid all sources of media, you've probably heard or read the word "whistleblower" once or twice in the past couple of months.

Whistleblowers have been making headlines a lot lately, both in sports and in politics.


James Poniewozik portrait
Courtesy of Penguin Random House

 

How did Donald Trump vault from the faux-boardroom of The Apprentice into the Oval Office?

A new book called Audience of One: Donald Trump, Television, and the Fracturing of America offers some answers. 

illustration of four people hugging and saying you are precious beyond belief
Roza Nozari for Michigan Radio

When was the first time you decided to flip the script on all the negative stuff you were programmed to believe about yourself?

Take Virgie Tovar, for example. She is a body image activist and the author of the forthcoming book, "The Self-Love Revolution: Radical Body Positivity for Girls of Color." She also wrote the book, “You Have The Right To Remain Fat." 

Consider the banana. Actually, consider the top banana, because that's the phrase that someone recently brought to our attention.

Professor Anne Curzan says a friend told her she loves the phrase "top banana" because of its theater etymology. 

"I wanted to nod wisely at that moment, like I knew that piece of information, but in fact, I did not," Curzan says.


Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

When you think of a daiquiri, you might think of summer. Tammy Coxen with Tammy’s Tastings thinks the daiquiri has a place in fall too.

“We're in that transitional season. We're still getting hot days but cool nights and so I went with an Autumn Daiquiri today,” she said.

illustration of a man and woman talking with chat bubbles around them
Stephanie Rodriguez for Michigan Radio

How do you decide when it’s the right time to say something or stay silent?

You're lying in bed on one of the hottest nights of the year. Fortunately, you've got a nice, quiet fan on top of your dresser to keep you cool while you sleep.

Suddenly, that fan starts making a noise akin to an angry Rottweiler. You try turning it off and on. You try shaking it. You even try pleading with it, but nothing you do will quiet that fan.

It can't be denied. That fan is on the fritz.


Today it's politicians who sometimes get criticized for being wishy-washy, rather than the soup getting criticized as wishy-washy.

Let's back up a bit.

A listener named Sheryl Knox posed an interesting grammar question recently, but what really caught our eye was this line at the end the email: "Why are people so wishy-washy?"

While we can't answer that particular question, we can certainly take a closer look at "wishy-washy."


Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

It’s fall and there’s a hint of it in the air.

“It’s definitely getting into the season where I like to think about fall flavors in my cocktails,” said Tammy Coxen of Tammy’s Tastings.

Among the bottles in front of her was one of moonshine.

headshot of Becca and David
StoryCorps

David Feingold has bipolar disorder. He discussed how the disease has shaped his work as an artist and how it contributed to his divorce from his ex-wife. He spoke with his current significant other Becca Buchalter at the StoryCorps mobile booth in Flint.

A picture of Charisse Woods smiling
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

This Saturday, a ninth-grader from Detroit's Cass Tech High School will board a jet for Mumbai, India. Fourteen-year-old Charisse Woods will represent Detroit at the World Youth Chess Championships. We talked to Woods about how she got her start in chess, and her aspirations to become a National Master, a title very few chess players ever earn.

A beer sits on a wooden bartop
Unsplash

 


If you've purchased beer lately, you've probably noticed the local craft beer section has grown in your grocery store. There's been a rapid expansion of the craft brewing industry in Michigan over the past decade. 

Michigan is the fourth-largest beer state in the nation. Currently, there are more than 350 breweries making a huge variety of beers. But some small brewers say that number may not be as big as it could be, and they say state law makes it hard for them to grow their business.

If you totally don't drink alcohol, you could call yourself a teetotaler.

A listener recently asked us about the spelling of "teetotaler." They wanted to know why the beginning is spelled "tee" and not "tea," like the drink?


headshot of mother and daughter
StoryCorps

Dorothy Maxine Keely McClanahan is 95 years old. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Flint, she and her daughter, JoAnn McClanahan, talked about her memories of growing up in a large family in the city during the Great Depression.

Sometimes people send us questions that we avoid trying to answer. We don't do this to be mean.

The problem is, some questions we get have answers that are too long and complicated to explain within the confines of this segment.

This week though, we're throwing caution to the wind. We're finally going to tackle "between you and I."


headshot of mother and daughter
StoryCorps

After being born to a teenage mother, Sharon Simeon was adopted as an infant. She spent 23 years trying to find her birth mother, Johnnie Mallett Caruthers. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Flint, Simeon and Mallett Caruthers talked about the roads that led them apart, and eventually, back together.

Ora Labora residents in a black and white group photo
Bentley Historical Library / University of Michigan

Agriculture has a long history in Michigan and continues to be one of the state’s top industries. And for one 19th century utopian community in the Thumb, it was half of the equation to living a godly life.

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