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author interview

Rachael Denhollander portrait facing the camera in a black shirt
Nicole Bolinaux

Rachael Denhollander has become known in recent years as the leader of the "sister survivors" — a large group of women and girls sexually abused by disgraced former sports doctor Larry Nassar.

Denhollander was the first person to speak on the record about the sexual abuse she suffered under the guise of treatment. Now, she's out with a memoir about her life and her advocacy titled What Is A Girl Worth: My Story of Breaking the Silence and Exposing the Truth About Larry Nassar and USA Gymnastics.

A soldier holding a folded American flag
Capt. Justin Jacobs / albany.marines.mil

Today on Stateside, the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol is forcing Michigan ports to make expensive changes, even though ports nearby, including one in Toledo, don't have to do the same. Plus, the long and gruesome history of the invasive sea lamprey’s presence in the Great Lakes.

corner of a chessboard with black pieces set up
Pixabay

Today on Stateside, what impact does the impeachment inquiry into President Trump have on the auto industry? Plus, a new memoir about the price people pay when they are displaced from their true roots, generation after generation.

Potholes on a road in Ann Arbor.
Daniel Hensel / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, Michigan’s House Minority Leader shares her reaction to the agreement between Governor Whitmer and Republican legislative leaders to remove the issue of road funding from state budget negotiations. Plus, we talk to Aimee Stephens, a transgender woman involved in an employment discrimination case that is scheduled to go before the United States Supreme Court in October. 

foreclosure sign outside old home
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

 

Today on Stateside, a Detroit-based company tries to mediate the “plague” of tax foreclosures in the city of Detroit. Plus, we hear from a judge who might have made a legal path for LGBTQ people to go to court for discrimination even though there are no civil rights protections for them in Michigan.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement - or ICE - agents
U.S. Air Force

 

 

Today on Stateside, former Michigander Jimmy Aldaoud was deported to Iraq, a country he had never been to, in June. This week, his family says he died after not being able to obtain insulin for his diabetes. We talk to a family friend about what happened. Plus, the challenges of finding inclusive long-term care facilities when you're an LGBT senior.

 

Courtesy of the MI Supreme Court

 

 

Today on Stateside, how two new major US Supreme Court decisions will impact Michigan. Plus, with the anniversary of the Stonewall riots this Friday, we look at the history of the gay rights movement in Michigan.

 

Sign that says Flint vehicle city
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 

 

Today on Stateside, Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel comments on the recent dismissal of charges against state officials and others for actions related to the Flint water crisis. Plus, an interview with the writer of an "Afrofuturistic techno choreo-poem" set in 3071 Detroit. 

Michigan Radio

 

 

Today on Stateside, Michigan bean farmers send a lot of exports to Mexico. So, what happens to those farmers if President Trump follows through on his threats to add tariffs to Mexican goods? Plus, we hear about a tricked out bicycle with accordion and percussion instruments that blends classical music and public art. 

row of colorful car hoods
User Zelda Richardson / Flickr http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Today on Stateside, how will the auto industry be impacted if President Trump follows through on his threat to impose tariffs on Mexican goods? Plus, a theater in Kalamazoo brings its productions to life for people with blindness or visual impairment.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Baby's breath, an invasive flower affecting the Great Lakes sand dunes
Sarah Lamar / Grand Valley State University

Today on Stateside, a Wayne State University law professor remembers Judge Damon Keith, the longest-serving black judge in American history who died Sunday at age 96. Plus, why the popular flower baby’s breath poses a threat to the coastal sand dunes of the Great Lakes.

Car stuck between walls
Gareth Harrison / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, the legislature revisits Michigan’s high auto insurance rates, but will a decrease in rates only come with less guaranteed medical care? Plus, a study looks at how an all-renewable energy grid would have fared in January’s polar vortex.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

author steve hamilton
Franco Vogt / Courtesy of Steve Hamilton

 


This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Alex McKnight mystery series, and author Steve Hamilton is still turning out new books.

His most recent, the 11th in the series, is Dead Man Running

Hamilton joined Stateside’s Cynthia Canty to discuss this new novel and his surprising journey to becoming an award-winning writer.

Michael Zadoorian
Doug Coombe


No matter your age or your generation, the music you listened to in high school claims a special place in your heart.

Many kids use music to help overcome the trials and tribulations of adolescence. 

Michael Zadoorian’s new novel Beautiful Music centers around one of those kids. He talked to Stateside about how the music of 1970s Detroit inspired the book. 

Daniel Raimi headshot
Daniel Raimi

 


Michigan has used methods of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, for decades. The national debate over the use of fracking began only ten to fifteen years ago when companies began drilling down and across. 

Now companies can drill deposits one to three miles wide.

Author and University of Michigan Professor Daniel Raimi discusses the nuances and misconceptions of fracking in his new book “The Fracking Debate: The Risks, Benefits, and Uncertainties of the Shale Revolution.”

University Of Chicago Press, 2017

 

When was the last time you heard about a politician who realized she or he needed to change to help the country – that former ways had to be put aside to foster bipartisan cooperation for the good of the country? 

 

A U.S. senator from Michigan, Arthur Vandenberg, was such a person. 

Irene Butter headshot
Stateside Staff / Michigan Radio

 


 

Some 11 million people were killed during the Holocaust, and those who survived have lived so long, they're now watching the world forget. 

 

A recent poll shows 66 percent of American millennials don't know what Auschwitz is. Another 22 percent had not heard of the Holocaust or weren't sure if they had. 

 

Chatter House Press, 2017

 

Literature and popular culture haven't been particularly kind to single women. 

Just think of those common terms "spinster" or "old maid."

 

Writer Maureen Paraventi is taking that mean-spirited term and turning it inside out to come up with a modern look at women who choose not to marry.

 

Her new book is "The New Old Maid: Satisfied Single Women."

 

Paraventi, a Detroit-based journalist, novelist, and playwright, joined Stateside to share the story.