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Gov. Rick Snyder
gophouse.com

Today on Stateside, Michigan’s political world got baked into an upside down cake on Thursday as former Republican Governor Rick Snyder endorsed Joe Biden, and Democrat Mark Hackel threw his support behind a push to limit Governor Whitmer’s emergency powers. We'll talk to a reporter covering the party-flipping endorsements. Plus, we hear from a Detroit child care provider who is feeling the financial pressure as the pandemic continues and parents remain at home. 

the exterior of Pioneer High School in Ann Arbor
Dwight Burdette / Wikimedia Commons CC BY 3.0

Today on Stateside, the summer of calls for racial justice continues into the school year. A Black student at Ann Arbor’s Pioneer High School has filed a civil rights complaint against the school, alleging racial discrimination and an overall hostile environment for Black students. Also, an interview with the editor-in-chief of Car and Driver magazine as she works to create a more inclusive car culture and dealing with a changing auto industry.

Sonari Glinton with a Ford Bronco
Ford Motor Company

Ford's rollout of the new Bronco was one of the marquee online events of the summer. Millions of people tuned in for the online reveal, or at least caught some part of the vast advertising blitz as the grand dame of SUVs was reborn for a new generation of consumers. Ford also commissioned a new podcast, titled Bring Back Bronco: The Untold Story, to share the history of the iconic car.  The mind behind the series is journalist and former NPR reporter Sonari Glinton. 

worker on an assembly line leans into a car door
Adobe Stock

Automakers and their suppliers are back at work in Michigan. Ford, GM, Fiat-Chrysler and other manufacturers have been working with the United Auto Workers, government, and health experts to avoid potential spread of COVID-19.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell
Atlantic Council / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced on Thursday that Michigan factories will soon be allowed to resume operations. This is good news for the thousands of auto workers who will now be brought back on the line. But as we've heard this week, it's not a simple process. There are two equally critical aspects of reopening the economy—public health and financial stability.

no gun sign on glass door
Bumble Dee / Adobe Stock

Today on Stateside, plant managers are making plans to restart some of the biggest manufacturing operations in the state. We talk to Detroit News columnist Daniel Howes about what has to happen first. Plus, a protest on reopening the economy gives way to a discussion about guns at the state Capitol—and the politics around who is allowed to carry them.

a ventilator with tubes coming out of it
Adobe Stock Images

Today on Stateside, the Big Three auto companies have wound down production at their plants over worries about the spread of the novel coronavirus. Plus, how Michigan musicians are dealing with canceled concerts and connecting with their fans in the age of social distancing. 

Ford Motor Co. sign
Mike Mozart / Flickr http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Today on Stateside, the Big Three auto companies are rolling back operations in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. What does that mean for the state's economy? Plus, we talk to faith leaders about how they are guiding their congregants during the uncertainty of the COVID-19 outbreak.

UAW

Former United Auto Workers President Owen Bieber has died.  

Bieber led the UAW through a recession, industry downsizing and expanding global competition.

A worker handles finished auto parts on an assembly line
ADAC Automotive Muskegon operations

Today on Stateside, the coronavirus outbreak in China is beginning to have an effect on Michigan manufacturers. We hear from an executive at a west Michigan auto parts supplier about how the virus is affecting their business. Plus, we'll learn about Michigan's first African American settlers, as well as Enbridge's plan to replace a section of Line 5 under the St. Clair River.

a house with a foreclosure sign in front of it
BasicGov / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Today on Stateside, an investigation finds the city Detroit overcharged tens of thousands of homeowners for property taxes. What recourse is there for people who lost their homes as a result? We'll talk to the reporters who broke the story. Also, how the polls misread voters in 2016 – especially ones without a party affiliation.

Jeffrey M. Smith/School of Information

Turns out, we may not actually want driverless cars to drive like us. That’s according to researchers at the University of Michigan, who say they’ve found three core “personality” traits autonomous vehicles need to have to make people feel safer with them - even if they themselves don’t have those same traits.

Getting people to trust, and use, driverless cars

Daniel Howes / Detroit News

Fiat Chrysler’s deal of the decade is dead.

Good ol’ French politics killed it this week – exactly what you get when the federal government in Paris controls 15 percent of the hometown Renault.

Updated at 9:13 p.m. ET

Seventeen of the world's largest automakers have asked the White House and the state of California to restart talks and come up with one set of greenhouse gas standards for cars.

The Trump administration has been pushing to roll back regulations, while California has been holding tight to its tougher rules for auto emissions. The carmakers, meanwhile, call for "common sense compromise."

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer is concerned that escalating tariffs on Chinese goods may end up hurting Michigan’s economy.

Whitmer worries that Michigan’s exporting industries could be affected.

“Our international trade policy needs to be thoughtful… Not capricious and punitive,” says Whitmer. “I’m very concerned about what it’s going to mean for Michiganders and our ability to strengthen our economy.”

President Trump is backing down from his threat to shut down the U.S. Southern border as soon as this week.

Trump had issued the warning in a bid to curtail surging border crossings by asylum-seekers from Central America. Instead, he is now giving Mexico "a one-year warning" to address his concerns about its handling of immigrants traveling through the country on the way to the United States. He also demanded that Mexico tamp down on the flow of drugs.

Updated at 3:08 p.m ET

Frustrated by the large number of Central Americans who have been entering the country from Mexico, President Trump doubled down on his threat to close the Southern U.S. border.

"I'm ready to close it," Trump said Tuesday. "If we don't make a deal with Congress, the border is going to be closed, 100 percent."

Daniel Howes / Detroit News

The last time Detroit got a new auto plant, Papa Bush was in the White House and Detroit’s real reckoning was years away. In the nearly 30 years since, Ford Motor mortgaged the Blue Oval to survive Detroit’s two other automakers collapsed into federally induced bankruptcy, and all three found profitability.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s auto industry is bracing for potential tariffs on imported auto parts.

The U.S. Commerce Department delivered a report on Sunday to the White House on the national security implications of imported vehicle and auto parts. The “Section 232” national security report could potentially create the grounds for the president to impose a 25% tariff on imported vehicles and auto parts.

nissan suv
jairph / Unsplash

Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn had been arrested. He's been accused of financial misconduct after internal investigations found he had underreported his salary and used company assets for personal benefit. 

BBC journalist Leisha Santorelli joined Stateside to discuss what his arrest could mean for the future of the Japanese automaker.

Image of coding on a computer screen.
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, a BBC journalist tells us what Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn's recent arrest for financial misconduct could mean for the future of the Japanese automaker. Plus, after being diagnosed with a sleep disorder, an Ann Arbor high school student started a nonprofit to address the issue of sleep deprivation among teenagers.

US Fish and Wildlife Services

 

Today on Stateside, Michigan's opioid overdoses are at an all-time high. What are we doing wrong in the fight against addiction? Plus, as we celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, we take a look into the work the Michigan History Center is doing to represent a larger group of Michiganders.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.

Overdose deaths continue to rise despite state efforts on opioid crisis

 

man building a car
General Motors

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) might be in for a shakeup – and Michigan could feel the effects.

President Donald Trump has been negotiating with the U.S.’s neighbors to the north and south.

Michigan auto show
Michigan International Auto Show

 

President Trump says he has reached a trade deal with Mexico to replace NAFTA, even though the agreement announced on Monday does not include Canada.

cars on a highway
Joe Shlabotnik / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

 


Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan and a handful of residents have filed a federal lawsuit against the state of Michigan over the high cost of auto insurance.  

Michigan’s average rate is twice that of the national average. In Detroit, no-fault auto insurance costs about six thousand dollars a year.

user International Students’ Committee / wikimedia commons

 

Tributes have poured in for Sergio Marchionne, the former CEO of Chrysler and Fiat who died Wednesday. 

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes wrote: "His impact on the global auto industry cannot be overstated.”

Howes joined Stateside’s Cynthia Canty to discuss the qualities that made Marchionne a great leader.  

Daniel Howes / Detroit News

The automakers found their proverbial spines this week. After months of President Donald Trump’s haranguing about tariffs on finished vehicles and auto parts, the industry presented the country with a bill. Realizing the president’s protectionist dream would not come cheaply. The average cost of a vehicle would increase $5,800, says the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers.

Sarah Hulett / Michigan Radio

General Motors is warning that President Trump’s threatened tariffs on car imports could shrink the company and cost U.S. jobs.

Auto Manufacturers
Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

 


Earlier this month, President Trump announced new tariffs on steel and aluminum imported from the European Union, Canada, and Mexico. 

American automakers have indicated that these tariffs could be detrimental to the industry, estimating that just under 200,000 jobs will be lost in the first one to three years. 

Daniel Howes is a business columnist with the Detroit News. He sat down with Stateside’s Lester Graham to discuss how automakers are confronting the Trump administration. 

Ambassador Bridge
J. Stephen Conn / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCl0

 


Last week, Canada’s Minister of International Trade made an official visit to Detroit to meet with auto industry officials and other business leaders. 

Francois-Philippe Champagne sat down with Stateside to discuss the future of trade relations between the U.S. and Canada and the impact that relationship has on Michigan.

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