Believed | Michigan Radio
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Believed

Larry Nassar listens to Ingham County Judge Rosemarie Aquilina hand down his sentence of 175 years in prison.
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

After receiving reports of sexual abuse of athletes by former USA Gymnastics physician Larry Nassar in July 2015, senior officials in the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Indianapolis field office failed to respond with the "urgency that the allegations required."

believed podcast
Emma Winowiecki, Jodi Westrick, Kasey O'Dea, Nicole Bolineaux / Michigan Radio

Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism today announced that Michigan Radio is a winner of a 2020 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award for the station’s podcast series, Believed.  

The entertainment news website Vulture has selected Michigan Radio’s Believed podcast as one of their 10 Influential True-Crime Podcasts That Changed Everything.” Their listing points out that true crime podcasts are “…the engine that boosted the medium into the stratosphere,” and that some of the best journalism being produced today has borrowed from the production and writing style of true-crime podcasts. Besides Believed, other well-known true-crime podcasts on Vulture’s list are In The Dark, Dirty John, My Favorite Murder and Serial.

Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Former Michigan State University president Lou Anna Simon is officially retiring from the university.

MSU announced Simon’s retirement on Tuesday, as most of the news media’s attention was on the first of two Democratic presidential debates in Detroit.

LIna Jang

Michigan Radio’s Peabody award-winning reporters Lindsey Smith and Kate Wells have been recognized once again for their work on the Believed podcast.

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and the University of Michigan named the pair winners of the 2019 Livingston Award for Young Journalists for “Local Reporting.” The awards honor reporting that advances civic engagement and bolsters the work of young reporters producing powerful storytelling in the spirit of a free press.

Believed Wins 2018 Peabody Award

Apr 23, 2019

Michigan Radio’s Believed podcast was named a winner of a prestigious Peabody Award today in the Radio & Podcast category. This is the first time that Michigan Radio has won a Peabody Award.

The Peabody Awards Board of Jurors today announced that the Believed podcast from Michigan Radio and NPR is one of this year’s nominees for a prestigious Peabody Award in the Radio/Podcast category.

Michigan Radio’s Believed podcast has been awarded its first Dart Award from the prestigious Columbia School of Journalism. The Dart Award for Excellence in Coverage of Trauma recognizes outstanding reporting in all media that portrays traumatic events and their aftermath with accuracy, insight and sensitivity while illuminating the effects of violence and tragedy on victims’ lives.

Michigan Radio’s Believed podcast has been nominated for a Webby Award in the “Podcast: Best Mini Series” category. Hailed as the “Internet’s highest honor” by The New York Times, The Webby Awards, presented by the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences (IADAS), is the leading international awards organization honoring excellence on the internet.

Kyle Stephens
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

On this day last year, Kyle Stephens stood before Larry Nassar in an Ingham County courtroom and told him, "Little girls don't stay little forever. They grow into strong women that return to destroy your world."

"Believed" makes top podcast rankings

Jan 3, 2019
Maya Robinson/Vulture

Michigan Radio’s Believed podcast continues to receive accolades from media outlets around the country. In the series, reporters Kate Wells and Lindsey Smith looked at how former MSU and USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was able to abuse hundreds of women and girls for decades. The story was told from the perspective of several women who survived his abuse. 

The A.V. Club has named the Believed podcast from Michigan Radio and NPR as the “Best Coverage of a News Story” podcast its annual “Podmass Superlatives” list, 2018. The entertainment webzine gives this nod to the investigative reporting podcast just as the Believed series wraps up with its Epilogue episode, “No Pretty Bows” released this week.

The Immigration and Customs Enforcement Office in Grand Rapids
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan gives an update on the approximately 100 Iraqi immigrants who were detained in police custody for nearly a year and a half before a U.S. District Judge ordered their release last month. Plus, the lawyer representing residents in the Rockford area whose water was contaminated with PFAS weighs in on Senate Bill 1244, which would overhaul Michigan's standards for cleaning up toxic chemicals. 

Rahael Gupta
Michigan Radio

On today's show, Believed co-host Kate Wells breaks down a recent report that found top officials at the U.S. Olympic Committee knew former sports doctor Larry Nassar was sexually abusing his patients, yet took no disciplinary action against him. Plus, a conversation about the changing field of classical music between a graduate student and aspiring conductor, and the retired music director for the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

The U.S. Olympic Committee has fired chief of sport performance Alan Ashley in the wake of an independent report that said neither he nor former CEO Scott Blackmun elevated concerns about the Larry Nassar sexual abuse allegations when they were first reported to them.

Morgan McCaul
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, General Motors is set to keep receiving tax breaks from the state of Michigan until 2029. That's in spite of the company's recent decision to cut thousands of jobs and shut down production at two plants in the state. Plus, a co-author of this year's National Climate Assessment shares how climate change is projected to impact Michigan and the Midwest in coming decades. 

Former MSU President Lou Anna Simon
File photo / MSU

Former MSU President Lou Anna Simon has been charged with lying to police.

The Lansing State Journal reports Simon was charged today in Eaton County District Court with two felony counts and two misdemeanor counts. She is the third person charged by the Attorney General’s Office as part of its investigation of the university related to Larry Nassar.

Image of coding on a computer screen.
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, a BBC journalist tells us what Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn's recent arrest for financial misconduct could mean for the future of the Japanese automaker. Plus, after being diagnosed with a sleep disorder, an Ann Arbor high school student started a nonprofit to address the issue of sleep deprivation among teenagers.

Image shows a physician taking someone's blood pressure.
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, how the Affordable Care Act has impacted public health in Michigan in the five years since it was enacted. Plus, a conversation with the director of the Great Lakes National Cemetery, one of two national cemeteries in Michigan where the state's veterans are laid to rest.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Today on Stateside, a voting rights expert with the ACLU shares what Michiganders should know ahead of tomorrow’s midterm election. Plus, a conversation with actor and comedian Marc Evan Jackson who plays Shawn, an all-knowing immortal judge, on NBC’s The Good Place.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Believed, the new podcast from Michigan Radio and NPR, topped the Apple Podcast chart earlier this week, just one week after the series launched. Believed looks at how Larry Nassar was able to abuse hundreds of women and girls for decades. This timely and thoughtful limited-run podcast is an intimate look at how a team of women -- a detective, a prosecutor and an army of survivors -- won justice in one of the largest serial sexual abuse cases in U.S. history.

Michigan State University sign
Michigan State University

Today on Stateside, we talk with a Southfield rabbi about the recent attack on a Pittsburgh synagogue that left 11 congregants dead. Plus, a conversation with a leading expert on sexual assault prevention who is working to help Michigan State University better respond to sexual violence on campus following the Larry Nassar abuse scandal.

Kasey O'Dea

It’s late on a fall evening. Dark. September 16th, 2004.

A 17-year old girl walks towards the bright lights of a hospital in Lansing, Michigan.

She’s with her mom and a police officer.

Photo courtesy of Trinea Gonczar

Today on Stateside, we hear the first episode of Believed. It's a podcast series produced by Michigan Radio and NPR that explores how former sports doctor Larry Nassar sexually abused patients for more than 20 years. Plus, an interview with the series’ co-hosts, Michigan Radio reporters Kate Wells and Lindsey Smith.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Courtesy of Trinea Gonczar

It’s the 1996 Olympics. The U.S. Women’s Gymnastics team is on the verge of winning their first team gold medal. Kerri Strug is their last chance. She sprints toward the vault, launches into the air, and falls on the landing.

Michigan Radio's quick guide to podcasts

Oct 16, 2018

Interested in checking out our growing collection of podcasts and radio shows? If you are having some trouble figuring this all out, here’s a quick, easy guide to download and stream our shows! 

People around the world were stunned in early 2018 when more than 150 women testified at the sentencing of Larry Nassar, the Olympic gymnastics doctor who sexually abused patients for more than 20 years. How did he escape justice for so long? How was his appearance as the good guy, the ally, the protector maintained? Why did people keep trusting him? This October, Michigan Radio and NPR will premiere a new podcast called Believed that will answer those questions with greater depth and access than any previous coverage.