california wildfires | Michigan Radio
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california wildfires

A sunset seen through wildfire haze in Ann Arbor.
Lauren Talley / Michigan Radio

The wildfire season in the Pacific Northwest has been historic. With millions of acres of Western land up in flames, the trail of smoke has made its way to Michigan. It’s created strange and spectacular displays in the sky, especially at sunset. But Nick Schroeck says those beautiful colors hold an ugly truth: the impacts of climate change don’t stay in one spot.

a picture of a brick building on Albion College's campus
Albion College

On Stateside, how can schools keep COVID-19 cases under control on campus, while also holding in-person classes? Albion College is hoping that their pandemic pod model might be the answer. Also, why the spectacular skies caused by Western wildfires are a reminder of the collective stakes of climate change. And finally, we hear from members of an artist collective that questions white people's fascination with—and sometimes fetishization of—Indigenous culture.

(photo by Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio)

As wildfires across California have continued to cause massive damage this week, some Michigan residents have gone to California with organizations like the Red Cross to help those affected by the fires.

Kalamazoo resident Vicki Eichstaedt is a volunteer for the Red Cross’s Public Affairs team. She's currently in California, helping to take photos of damage done by the Camp Fire. She said the devastation is unlike anything she’s ever seen before.

NOAA

Smoke from the devastating California wildfires has reached Michigan, but it won’t be around for long.

Authorities have more than doubled their estimates of buildings destroyed in Southern California's huge wildfire. Officials said Monday that an estimated 370 structures burned and that only 15% of their damage estimate has been completed.

The size of the fire has also increased to more than 143 square miles (370 square kilometers) and was 20% contained Monday morning.

Air pollutants from California wildfires reach Michigan

Aug 21, 2018
Michigan fine particle pollution map, August 21, 2018
Michigan Department of Environmental Quality / Michigan Department of Environmental Quality

The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality is reporting increased levels of fine particulate air pollution caused by smoke from the California wildfires.

Stephanie Hengesbach is a meteorologist with the Air Quality Division within the MDEQ. She says the levels of fine particles found in the air are higher than expected, given the time of year, regional weather conditions, and direction of the wind.