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cancer research

sergio santos / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

New research from the University of Michigan’s Rogel Cancer shows that having breast cancer can lead to serious financial struggles, and that better communication from doctors might help ease this side effect.

50 percent of oncologists surveyed said someone in their practice always or often discusses the financial consequences of treatment with patients. But many patients said they haven't received enough help navigating the process, even though they'd like to be talking to their healthcare provider about it.

Michigan Medicine receives largest financial gift ever

Mar 29, 2018
The University of Michigan's Comprehensive Cancer Center
Michigan Medicine

The University of Michigan's Comprehensive Cancer Center in Ann Arbor has been gifted $150 million to boost research.

University regents are expected Thursday to approve renaming the facility the Rogel Cancer Center, after Richard and Susan Rogel.

The Rogels have committed a total of $150 million to the center during the university's Victors for Michigan campaign, including $40 million that was previously announced, according to the Michigan Record.

fungi growing on cheerio
Courtesy of Robert Cichewicz

Could a fungus from the bottom of the Great Lakes hold a cure for cancer?

The final answer is still far in the distance, but a team of scientists believes there is promise in newly discovered Great Lakes fungi.

outline of human body
Alexander Tokarev / Courtesy of Arul Chinnaiyan

Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have taken a big step forward in understanding how to craft precision treatments for advanced cancer – cancer that has metastasized, or spread.

Using 520 tumor types, they found that in 90 percent of cases, key contributors to an individual patient’s cancer can be identified.

flickr user Andres Pérez / Flickr

Scientists study chemicals for their potential to cause cancer, but usually they examine them one at a time.

And yet, we’re exposed to mixtures of different chemicals every day.

Dr. Julie Silver.
juliesilvermd.com

In the battle against cancer, patients and physicians can pull out all the stops – surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy.

If all goes as planned, the patient goes into remission and gets back to his or her life.

But what about the physical toll of all of these cancer therapies? Some treatments are inherently toxic.

Dr. Julie Silver is a physician, an associate professor at Harvard Medical School, and a breast cancer survivor. She's come up with a program of cancer rehabilitation and “pre-habilitation.”

Listen to our conversation with Dr. Julie Silver below.


The broad view of the giant colon.
American Cancer Society

That one got our attention too.

The press release from the University of Michigan News Service starts with "here's your chance:"

The University of Michigan Health System will partner with the American Cancer Society to bring a 32-foot-long, 14-foot-high giant replica of the colon to Briarwood Mall, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. March 22, to raise awareness  of colorectal cancer.

What does such a thing look like? We asked for a few photos.

U of M physicians will also be on hand to answer any questions visitors might have.

Sarah Alvarez

In honor of July 4th, we asked immigrants across Michigan what America means to them. Abdo Najy shared his story.

Abdo Najy has just recently completed his PhD and hopes to run his own lab soon. He's friendly, smiles a lot, and is animated when he talks about his research on breast and prostate cancer. 

Najy is modest and measured, but he knows he has a role in the search for a cure to cancer. He views his work as a scientist as his way to repay this country for educational opportunities he would not have had in his native Yemen. 

Born in Yemen in the 1980’s in the midst of a polio outbreak, Najy contracted the disease when he was just six months old.

medindia.net

The statistics are scary: some 40,000 women are dying from breast cancer each year.

But some breast cancer survivors are getting double mastectomies they don't need, in the wrong belief it helps keep cancer from coming back.

That's according to a new University of Michigan study. For some survivors, the study says, the fear of cancer returning is so strong, they're getting risky surgeries for some false peace of mind.

If you've survived breast cancer, it can make medical sense to get that cancer-ridden breast removed.