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Marijuana plant
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Legalizing marijuana could have unintended consequences for public schools in Michigan.

Earlier this month, Michigan residents voted to pass a ballot proposal to legalize marijuana for people 21 and older.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Legalizing recreational marijuana would net half a billion dollars in new state tax revenue over its first five years, that's according to a new study.

The study was commissioned by the group behind the November ballot question to legalize recreational marijuana in Michigan.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

In November, Michigan voters will decide if they want to legalize recreational marijuana.

Supporters say the industry that develops should be an economic boost for rural Michigan.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s entrepreneurs are seeing dollar signs with the state’s vote in November to legalize recreational marijuana.

But many out-of-state interests are already moving in.

marijuana plant
Eljoja / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

When it comes to the issue of marijuana – to legalize or not to legalize – Michigan seems to be about where Colorado was not too long ago.

Colorado had over a decade to experiment with medical marijuana before legalizing its recreational use in November 2012, which Colorado Public Radio’s Ben Markus tells us gave the state ample opportunity to figure out how marijuana can fit into the political and business landscape.

“Medical marijuana was huge. The state then decided, hey, we need to regulate this thing,” he says.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The state Senate may vote in the next day or so on major changes to Michigan’s medical marijuana law.

The bills would create a framework for licensing dispensaries and regulating edible forms of marijuana. 

Critics say the legislation is too vague.  

“I think it’s the equivalent of Obamacare in terms of not being vetted properly,” says Terrence Jungel, with the Michigan Sheriff’s' Association. 

But supporters say the legislation has been under development for years and is not being rushed through in the final days of the Legislature’s lame-duck session.