coronavirus test | Michigan Radio
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coronavirus test

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Michigan is now testing nearly 15,000 people per day on average, state officials say. That’s a big improvement. But it’s still far short of the “robust level” of 30,000 daily tests needed “to help us identify any new cases and swiftly contain the disease,” Chief Medical Executive Dr. Joneigh Khaldun said Friday. 

A healthcare worker process a COVID-19 test at Beaumont.
Beaumont Health

Michigan researchers say they’ve created a new test for COVID-19 that’s 500 times more sensitive than the standard coronavirus test.

Researchers say the standard tests can have between 20% to 30% false negatives - particularly in patients who have not yet exhibited symptoms.

Downtown Ann Arbor
Katie Raymond / Michigan Radio

Some politicians and businesses are pressuring Governor Gretchen Whitmer to reopen the economy. Republican legislative leaders have a plan to phase in business operations.  It’s very difficult to make an informed decision about opening the economy because no one has enough data to know exactly how risky it could be.

A healthcare worker process a COVID-19 test at Beaumont.
Beaumont Health

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services says the state has the capacity to process 9,500 COVID-19 tests a day. That’s between the state lab, commercial labs, and labs in hospital systems.

Jake Neher / via oakgov.com

Oakland County is opening up its own drive-thru COVID-19 testing site on the county government’s Pontiac campus.

It will only test people with COVID-19 symptoms. It will focus on first responders, essential business employees, and Pontiac residents to start.

Beaumont Health

Beaumont Health is launching what it believes to be the largest study in the country to date to test people for COVID-19 antibodies.

The serological blood-testing study looks to answer some crucial questions about the body’s immune response to COVID-19, including: how much immunity does having had COVID-19 provide? And how long does that immunity last?

Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

In Detroit, which has been ravaged by COVID-19, Mayor Mike Duggan has made mass testing the centerpiece of his administration’s response.

“The way we beat this is through testing, and knowing who’s infected and who’s not, so we can separate," Duggan has said.

Some may wonder what benefits mass testing provides at this stage in the pandemic. After all, we know it’s here and that it’s spreading. And testing may not change any individual patient’s treatment.

But experts say widespread testing is crucial for public health — and can be vital for patients as well.


Michigan has crossed another grim milestone in the COVID-19 outbreak.

For the first time, more than 100 Michiganders have died from the disease in a 24-hour period.

State health officials reported Monday an additional 110 people have died of coronavirus. A big leap from the 77 deaths reported Sunday.

Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Michigan now has among the most COVID-19 cases in the country. As of Friday, that number was 3,657, with 92 reported deaths.

But the state has tested far fewer people relative to other states with similarly high numbers.

Mike Duggan
detroitmi.gov

The former Michigan State Fairgrounds in Detroit will have a new use starting Friday: as a drive-through testing site for COVID-19.

The new testing site is a partnership between the city of Detroit, three local health systems—Henry Ford Health System, the Detroit Medical Center, and Trinity Health—and Wayne, Oakland, and Macomb counties. Those three counties account for nearly 85% of Michigan’s COVID-19 cases right now.

prison bars
Flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Eight staff members at the Wayne County Sheriff’s Department tested positive for the new coronavirus. At least seven of those employees have been in contact with other employees and inmates at the county jail.

Sheriff’s spokeswoman Pageant Atterberry says any inmate who shows symptoms of coronavirus infection is separated from the general population and sent to jail medical facilities. If needed, an inmate would be transported for treatment. So far, only one inmate has been examined and found not to be infected.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio