Coronavirus | Michigan Radio
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Coronavirus

For Michigan Radio's full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak, click here.

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steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Small Michigan businesses struggling to stay afloat amid the COVID-19 pandemic are getting a helping hand this week from local and state government agencies.

Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit
Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

In the wake of the new coronavirus pandemic, hospitals across the state are now screening all employees before they start their shifts.

That screening usually comes in the form of a survey, where they self-report recent domestic and international travel, contact with someone who has COVID-19, and symptoms of COVID-19 like a dry cough and a fever. But are hospitals actually taking their employee’s temperatures?

 

doctor wearing mask
Ashkan Forouzani / Unsplash

More Michigan healthcare workers on the frontlines of the coronavirus outbreak are getting sick.

Some are testing positive for the virus themselves – at Sparrow Health System in Lansing, at least seven caregivers have tested positive, even though that area hasn’t been nearly as hard hit as metro Detroit.

Other doctors and nurses have been exposed, but are being asked to return to work before their quarantine is over, raising questions about hospitals’ back-up plans and staffing capacity. 

But what happens if we get to the point where there’s a serious shortage of critical care providers, is still an open question. 

Rep. Elissa Slotkin
Katie Raymond / Michigan Radio

Today, Congress passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Support Act, or the CARES Act. The $2 trillion stimulus is the third piece of coronavirus relief legislation passed by Congress.

The bill contained $150 billion in relief money for individual states. It is estimated that Michigan will receive $3.8 billion in aid from the bill.

 

City of Detroit Health Department

Metro Detroit has become one of the nation’s COVID-19 hotspots. And experts predict the situation will get even more dire in the next several weeks.

The city of Detroit is a hotspot within the hotspot. As of Thursday, the city reported 888 COVID-19 cases, with 19 deaths so far.


detroit skyline
Wikimedia commons

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan warned on Thursday that southeast Michigan is already a national COVID-19 hotspot—and the worst is still to come.

Detroit itself is a huge hotspot within southeast Michigan. The city is reporting 888 COVID-19 cases as of Thursday. 19 people have already died.

hospital room
Dan Stevens / Pexels

With a surge of COVID-19 patients beginning at some hospitals here in Michigan, healthcare workers on the front lines of the outbreak may soon have to make some tough decisions about serving their patients, and protecting their co-workers, families, and themselves.

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