COVID-19 | Michigan Radio
WUOMFM

COVID-19

As confirmed cases of COVID-19 surge in Michigan, Michigan Radio will be tracking stories about the people impacted, how our healthcare system is faring, what it means for our economy, and more. You can find all of our latest coverage below, or click here to see the latest update of COVID-19 cases and deaths. The feed below also includes national coverage of COVID-19 from NPR.

This is ongoing coverage. 

Helpful posts:

Have you been affected by coronavirus? We want to hear from you. Submit a tip.

Beach
Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources has announced reopening dates for camping, harbors, and other outdoor areas. Camping at state forest campgrounds and overnight stays in DNR-managed harbors resume Wednesday, June 10. State parks have remained open for public use during the COVID-19 pandemic, but campgrounds, overnight lodging facilities, and shelters have been closed since March 23 in compliance with Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s executive order. 

Kendal @hikendal for Unsplash

Michigan is now testing nearly 15,000 people per day on average, state officials say. That’s a big improvement. But it’s still far short of the “robust level” of 30,000 daily tests needed “to help us identify any new cases and swiftly contain the disease,” Chief Medical Executive Dr. Joneigh Khaldun said Friday. 

State of Michigan

More marches and rallies are scheduled for this weekend to protest the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers.

And that concerns local public health officials who fear large gatherings may spread the virus that causes COVID-19.

Denise Fair is Detroit’s Chief Public Health Officer. She says she doesn’t want to discourage people from speaking out.

A long table surrounded by red chairs in a school classroom.
BES Photos / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Health and safety risks are in the forefront of Michigan teachers' thoughts as they consider what public education might look like this fall with the uncertainties of COVID-19.

That's according to a Michigan Education Association survey of its 120,000 members, conducted May 14-22 and released Thursday.

teacher standing in front of class with large monitor
Steve Riot / Pixabay

Today on Stateside, one sheriff shares what his department has learned about its own biases and discusses if proposed reforms for police departments are enough. Plus, what's on teachers' minds as they look at plans to reopen schools this fall. 

Doctor or nurse sitting down with hands clasped
Jonathan Borba / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, healthcare workers emerging from months of fighting the COVID-19 pandemic find themselves in need of mental health support. Two reporters discuss what they’ve heard from the medical frontlines. Also, a check-in on the status of Michigan’s summer camps. Plus, a conversation with a lawyer helping arrested protestors, and an essay about protesting by the poet laureate of Grand Rapids.

High school girls soccer match during the Flint Olympian Games.
Flint Olympian and CANUSA Games / flickr.com

The Michigan High School Athletic Association has updated their guidelines on summer athletics. This comes after Governor Gretchen Whitmer lifted Michigan’s COVID-19 related stay at home order. Now, groups of up to 100 can gather outside, as long as they practice social distancing.

people gathered around a campfire
Unsplash

Some parents and guardians staring down the prospect of a long summer with young kids cooped up at home are breathing a sigh of relief. When Governor Gretchen Whitmer lifted the COVID-19 stay home order, she loosened the restrictions on many businesses and programs. That includes children’s day camps, which will be allowed to reopen starting June 8.

Courtesy of Maureen Biddinger-Grisius

The nurse’s husband woke her up the night she started screaming in her sleep.

“I was crying.” she said. “I cannot remember what the dream was about, but it was so real.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint’s pipe replacement project is restarting as the state lifts COVID-19 restrictions.

The city has been replacing lead and galvanized water service lines since 2016. The underground pipes connecting homes and businesses to city water mains were a primary source of lead in Flint’s tap water during the city’s water crisis.

an open sign in a shop window
Mike Petrucci / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, we spoke with activists who organized some of this week's protests in Detroit and Grand Rapids. Plus, Governor Whitmer rolled back some significant restrictions on business and gatherings yesterday which was a huge relief for some, but left many with huge gray areas about how commerce and social life will go forward.

(Subscribe to Stateside on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or with this RSS link)

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.

gretchen whitmer sitting at table
michigan.gov

Governor Gretchen Whitmer testified Tuesday before a congressional subcommittee on the state’s COVID-19 response. As of Tuesday afternoon, 5,553 people in Michigan are known to have died from the disease.

Whitmer just lifted restrictions on many business operations and public gatherings. But the governor said she’s very concerned about the upcoming flu season.

Gretchen Whitmer at a podium
State of Michigan

Governor Gretchen Whitmer describes comments made by President Donald Trump during a phone call with the nation’s governors Monday as "dangerous."

The call focused on weekend protests that turned violent.

State of Michigan

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer is scheduled to testify about Michigan’s response to the COVID-19 crisis before a congressional committee Tuesday.

A subcommitte of the U.S. House Committee on Energy and Commerce is scheduled to hear from Whitmer, along with the governors of Colorado and Arkansas. 

CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION (CDC)

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer has lifted Michigan's coronavirus stay-at-home order – but not everything will re-open right away.

Salons, casinos and gyms will stay shuttered due to an inability to maintain proper social distancing.
Whitmer says Michiganders will be able to eat at their favorite establishments next week.

Garlin Gilchrist
Facebook video screengrab

Governor Gretchen Whitmer released a video statement Sunday in response to demonstrations across Michigan over the weekend against police brutality.

Whitmer was joined on the video by Lieutenant Governor Garlin Gilchrist. They both said anger over the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis is justified. But they asked people to find non-violent ways to express their frustration.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

An Owosso barber hopes the Michigan Supreme Court will get involved in his case Monday so he can stay open.

Last week, A Shiawassee County Circuit Court judge ordered Karl Manke to close and lock his barbershop.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The U.S. Justice Department is throwing its support behind businesses suing the state of Michigan over the governor’s executive orders to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Along with signing her stay at home order, Governor Gretchen Whitmer has issued dozens of other executive orders. The orders shut down businesses across the state.   

gretchen whitmer at a press conference
michigan.gov

As Michigan faces a more than 22% unemployment rate, Governor Gretchen Whitmer is encouraging business owners to call back workers even if it’s just part-time.

graduation caps  being thrown in the air
Satria Perkasa / Unsplash

High school seniors have all of the concerns that younger kids have right now. They're missing their friends, their schools, and their normal schedules. On top of that, they are uncertain about what their next steps will look like or how the deep economic ripples caused by the pandemic will affect them. It's anything but a fun summer. Stateside talked to three high school seniors about what it's like when a major milestone gets overshadowed by a global public health pandemic. 

Michigan’s Beaumont Health cancels merger with Ohio system, vague on why

May 29, 2020
beaumont hospital wayne exterior
Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

Plans to merge Beaumont Health, Michigan’s largest hospital system, and Ohio-based Summa Health have ended — unrelated to financial losses from COVID-19, Beaumont said Friday morning.

Summa CEO Dr. Cliff Deveny said Beaumont surprised Summa officials last week, notifying Summa in phone calls and “official letters” that it was withdrawing from the planned merger.

A bearded man with a mask on holding a tooth brush in front of his face
Tyler Scott

Debra Hibbeln and her partner found ways to get by when their Dental practice was closed because of the pandemic. Now they’ve re-hired their employees, and spent a lot of time and money putting new equipment and safety measures in place.  

But instead of re-opening as soon as they can on Friday, they’re taking things slow. A lot has changed after all.

flooded street in Midland
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we touched base with agriculture workers, and what some farmers are doing to keep their seasonal employees safe. Plus, writer Donavan Hohn talks about the inner coast explored in his new essay collection.

(Subscribe to Stateside on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or with this RSS link)

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.

The further we get into growing season, the more complex life becomes for Michigan's farmers and farmworkers. They're trying to plant and harvest at a time when the world is moving in slow-motion, if at all. 

Courtesy of Bedrock

Detroit's largest commercial real estate company is offering its retail and restaurant tenants a new form of rent relief, through an initiative called "Bedrock Relaunch." 

Dan Gilbert's Bedrock is giving these tenants the option to pay 7% of gross sales instead of paying their regular rent. 

The University of Michigan campus, normally packed with students, is now empty.
Katie Raymond

The University of Michigan’s President says he hopes the school soon can decide when to reopen the campus to faculty and students. Mark Schlissel says it will be a gradual return.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

An administrative judge has upheld the state’s decision to suspend the license of an Owosso barber who has openly violated Michigan’s ‘Stay at Home’ order.

couple walking on a sidewalk
Katie Raymond / Michigan Radio

Child care businesses in Michigan are still shut down as part of Governor Whitmer's "Stay Safe, Stay Home" executive order, except for those caring for children of essential workers. 

Rebooting this industry will be essential for the recovery of the state’s economy.  But child care administrators say it will likely be a painfully slow process, and require the creation of a “new normal,” for kids, parents, and workers.

Pages