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criminal record

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

A bipartisan group of Michigan lawmakers says it’s time to change state law and let more people expunge their criminal records.

Current state law only allows people convicted of certain offenses to expunge one felony or two misdemeanors. Lawmakers say that’s too narrow, and keeps too many people from really getting a second chance—especially when it comes to getting a job.

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Some residents of northern Michigan could be eligible to have their criminal records expunged. The Michigan Supreme Court and University of Detroit Mercy’s law school will be holding a series of clinics that will help guide people through that process.

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Laws that ban criminal background questions on job applications have backfired, according to a study from the University of Michigan and Princeton University.

So-called "Ban the Box" laws are meant to give job seekers with criminal records a better shot at finding employment.

The study suggests that while such policies may produce that outcome, they also increase racial discrimination by employers.

U of M researcher and study co-author Sonja Starr says this unintended outcome relates to a theory called "statistical discrimination."

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A group of West Michigan business leaders wants their peers to consider hiring people who’ve served time in jail.

Butterball Farms started hiring people with criminal records 20 years ago to attract more qualified candidates to their butter processing business.

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One Republican state senator wants some criminal convictions to be automatically scrubbed from public records.

Sen. Rick Jones, R-Grand Ledge, says he plans to introduce the legislation soon after lawmakers return from their three-week break for deer hunting and Thanksgiving.

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Flickr user Jack / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Access to Justice Clinic at Western Michigan University Cooley Law School and the 61st District Court are teaming up to help give some criminals a second chance.

Legal experts at the event next week will offer one-on-one legal consultations to help people determine whether their crimes are eligible for expungement.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The state Senate Judiciary committee will consider a bill tomorrow that would make it easier for criminals to have part of their records expunged.

House Bill 4186 would allow people convicted of a single felony or a couple of misdemeanors to apply to have them removed from their record.