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Daniel Howes

General Motors CEO Mary Barra
flickr user David Pinter / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

General Motors CEO Mary Barra said Wednesday that, “GM is a vastly different company today than just five years ago,” and then went on to announce profits that were a little better than had been estimated.

But how much does that mean when times are good for all the car makers right now?

In the paper Thursday, Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes wonders if GM is as vastly different as Barra claims.

Quentin Kruger / Wikimedia Commons

Robert "Steve" Miller is back in town.

The former Chrysler exec known as "The Turnaround Kid" is running International Automotive Components. 

It's been nearly 10 years since Miller and the Delphi directors decided to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy - making Delphi an American company in name only. 

The reaction at the time was instantaneous and loud. 

president trump
flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

It's no secret that voters here in Michigan and across the country are angry and cynical about the notorious gridlock in Washington that has brought the country to its knees with budget showdowns.

It doesn't help that Michigan lawmakers have returned to their summer vacations without a deal to repair our decaying roads.

But as Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes points out, the state House found time to devote to a sex scandal.

International Students’ Committee / Wikimedia Commons

Fiat Chrysler was recently fined a record $105 million dollars for multiple recall violations. This has complicated the goal of the company's CEO Sergio Marchionne to merge with another automaker.

Business columnist Daniel Howes with the Detroit News says Marchionne has "made no secret of the fact that he's most interested in doing a deal with General Motors."

Flickr user pontla / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Fourth of July weekend is at hand. In addition to reaching for a hot dog or a burger, more Michiganders are reaching for a paddle.

"There's a growing interest in all forms of it. From the old canoes on the rivers to sea kayaking to recreational boats down around Belle Isle to stand-up paddleboards," says Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes, who focused on this growing demand for his most recent column.

GM Renaissance Center in Detroit.
John F. Martin / Creative Commons / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Auto sales are humming along. In fact, May brought the best light-vehicle sales ever recorded for that month: over 1.6 million units.

So, what's with the "immediate retirements" of top bargainers for General Motors and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles?

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes worries that "the wheels are starting to wobble" for Detroit's auto industry.

Flickr user Argonne National Laboratory / Flickr

Lawmakers are still discussing how to manage the $9.4 billion in tax credits Michigan owes automakers.

The incentives started under Gov. John Engler and were mainly used during Gov. Jennifer Granholm's era. Their purpose was to keep automakers in Detroit, and Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes says this plan was largely successful.

"The problem is the bills are becoming due and you've got folks in the Legislature who are arguing about what they're going to do about it," Howes says.

There's no way around paying them, and Howes says, "The debate now is what do they do going forward and what does that do to Michigan's competitiveness."

Detroit City Council
Detroit City Council / Facebook

The Detroit bankruptcy is over, and now Detroit City Council President Brenda Jones and City Clerk Janice Winfrey want pay raises.

The request came just about the time city pensioners started feeling the cuts to their health care and pensions exacted by the Detroit bankruptcy.

Capitol Building in Lansing, MI
Matthileo / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

When Governor Rick Snyder was answering your questions earlier this week here on Michigan Radio, he waded into the issue of more than $9 billion in outstanding tax credits owed to businesses that stayed in Michigan and re-invested in their operations here. And that has tipped Michigan's budget into a deficit.

The program began in the Engler Administration but was widely used in the latter part of the Granholm Administration. Critics call it "corporate welfare," but Snyder disagreed with this terminology, saying the companies benefiting from this program helped create jobs.

Courtesy of City of Detroit, Mayor's Office

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan delivered his State of the City address this week.

Detroit News columnist Daniel Howes says Duggan didn't talk much about the auto industry, but instead focused on entrepreneurship and how to support small businesses.

This reflects much of Detroit, and Michigan's deeper history, according to Howes.

"Both Detroit and Michigan's roots were planted by entrepreneurs and really the Michigan that a lot of people knew and think back on, the golden age if you will, was the fruit of the entrepreneurial spirit," says Howes.

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