Debbie Dingell | Michigan Radio
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Debbie Dingell

Debbie Dingell is running for the U.S. House of Representatives in Michigan's 12th District as the Democratic candidate.

(Scroll below to see all the Michigan Radio stories she's been mentioned in.)

As part of our election coverage, we asked all the major-party candidates running for Congress the same questions.

4 Questions for Debbie Dingell:

1) What is the most important issue facing your district?

Creating good-paying jobs and supporting manufacturing are among the top priorities facing our district, state and nation. We need to ensure U.S. companies and workers can compete on a level playing field by opposing unfair trade deals like the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). We also need to improve long-term care and work toward affordable, quality health care including mental health care for all Americans. And we need to work in a bipartisan way to fix what doesn’t work in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) – repealing the ACA would be harmful, irresponsible and explode the deficit. With too many students saddled with massive student debt obligations, we need to extend low-interest student loans to borrowers and continue fighting for affordable early childhood education. Finally, protecting the Great Lakes and supporting conservation of our natural resources is a moral responsibility we have to the people we represent.

2) How do you plan to address it?

Two years ago, I first ran for Congress because I believe in getting things done. While I know one person can’t do everything, it is my belief that one person can make a difference. And if you don’t care who gets credit, you can get a lot more done. That’s the approach I’ve taken in Washington – whether it was fighting unfair trade deals so American workers can compete on a level playing field, protecting our state’s natural resources by helping to shut down the St. Clair pipeline, advocating for permanent reauthorization of the Land and Water Conservation Fund or finding ways to make health care more affordable and accessible by partnering to fight cancer and improve our mental health system.

But there’s more to do, and it’s important that we have people in Washington who aren’t afraid to build coalitions to get things done. The American people are tired of partisan bickering and want us to work together to find solutions.

3) What book or movie have you seen/read recently that you would recommend

The only movie I have seen recently is “A Few Good Men”, which was often recommended to me when I spoke of a constituent who died in the Marines. I knew something was wrong, and the movie contains troubling parallels to what he experienced. Books are my therapy. I read one every day or two. I love fiction and history, and if you read diverse authors you can learn much. Some recent favorites: “Home” by Harlan Coben, “The One Man” by Andrew Gross, “Woman of God” by James Patterson, and “The Crossing” by Michael Connelly

4) If you don't win the election, what will you do?

I’ve helped build coalitions all my life around issues that matter. That’s something I learned the importance of in high school when I helped organize the movement that gave 18-year-olds the right to vote in Michigan or when upon learning that women weren’t included in studies funded by the federal government, I founded the Women’s Health Resource Center. That’s what I’ve worked hard to do in Congress – bring people of diverse backgrounds together to address important issues, from jobs to health to trade – because that’s how you get results and find solutions.

I’m going to work hard for every vote this election. But whether I’m in the Congress or in Michigan, I will never stop working to bring people together to solve problems. That’s one of the reasons I’m running for office; I believe we need people in Washington who are committed to working together to get things done and make a positive difference in people’s lives. 

Debbie Dingell and Fred Upton
Wikicommons

 

Name-calling. Punching back. Finger-pointing. It's what we've come to expect out of Washington.

U.S. Representatives Fred Upton (R-6th District) and Debbie Dingell (D-12th District) are calling for a return to civility and collegiality at the nation's Capitol, and in America more broadly. 

They co-authored an op-ed in the Detroit News earlier this year, writing "A vibrant democratic republic depends on vigorous debate — but also recognizes the importance of compromise." 

Stateside spoke with Dingell and Upton Wednesday morning ahead of an appearance at the Detroit Economic Club.

An open book that says "Veto" in red stamped with red ink pad next to it
Adobe Stock

 


Today on Stateside, Governor Gretchen Whitmer explains the reasoning behind her 147 line-item vetoes in the state budget she signed Monday night. Plus, Congresswoman Debbie Dingell and Congressman Fred Upton talk about civility in an era of partisanship and division. 

President Donald Trump
Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Three Michigan Congressional delegates are joining calls for an inquiry into the possibility that President Trump attempted to coerce a foreign government into investigating a political rival.

Over the weekend, reports emerged of a call Trump had with the Ukranian president Volodymyr Zelensky in July. A whistleblower claimed that Trump had suggested Zelensky investigate former Vice President and Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden's son, Hunter, who worked with a gas company owned by a Ukranian oligarch.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell
U.S. House of Representatives

Today on Stateside, U.S. Representative Debbie Dingell on what Democrats need to do if they want to win Michigan in 2020. Plus, why so many modern apartment buildings across the state — and the nation — look so much alike. 

PFAS foam on lakeshore
Michigan Department of Environmental Quality / Flickr http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill Friday that looks to address PFAS contamination near military bases.

The National Defense Authorization Act has provisions in it that would require the Department of Defense to treat contaminated water that's used for agriculture.

Protesters gathered in Ypsilanti to call for Congressional action on immigrant detention practices
Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

Protesters gathered outside of the Ypsilanti office of Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (D-Michigan) to call for the closure of immigrant detention centers and an end to family separation practices.

Jessica Prozinski is a protest organizer. She says the rally in Ypsilanti was one of almost 200 taking place on Tuesday in cities across the country.

“We are emotional, we are outraged,” Prozinski says. “But we also need a plan. Phone calls and emails are not enough.”

picture of paczkis
Michigan Radio Razi Jafri

Today on Stateside, we grow our understanding of Jewish and Muslim communities in Michigan and learn more about their histories and their futures. Plus, we celebrate Fat Tuesday with paczki! 

Debbie Dingell and Fred Upton
Wikicommons

Two U.S. Representatives from Michigan made an appeal for more cooperation between political parties at a forum hosted by the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy.

Wikicommons

John Dingell,  the longest-serving member of Congress in American history, died Thursday of cancer at age 92.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell
Atlantic Council / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

As we approach Election Day on November 6, Stateside is interviewing congressional candidates around the state about the issues most important to them.

Debbie Dingell is the incumbent Democrat in Michigan’s 12th Congressional District. She has represented the district since 2015.

Unsplash

Today on Stateside, a member of Canada’s House of Commons and a reporter with the Windsor Star break down Canada’s legalization of recreational marijuana — which goes into effect tomorrow — and how that change will affect travelers on both sides of the border. Plus, Representative Debbie Dingell (D-12th District) shares her thoughts on the upcoming midterm elections and on President Trump's recently-negotiated United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (UMSCA).

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

A cyanobacterial bloom on Lake Erie in 2013.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell announced Tuesday that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is giving a grant of $585,702 to the Great Lakes Observing System. The money will go toward improving the collection and sharing of data on early signs of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in Lake Erie.

This map shows areas of concern in the Oscoda area.  PFAs has been slowly spreading for the former U.S. Air Force base for decades.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Several Michigan members of Congress are sending a letter to the Trump administration requesting stronger safeguards for dangerous chemicals in drinking water.

A recent Harvard study found six million Americans are drinking water contaminated with a group of chemicals,  per- and polyfluoroalkyl chemicals, better known as PFAS.

The chemicals have been linked to an increased risk of liver damage and pregnancy problems, among other health issues.

Official White House portrait

U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Michigan, is joining other Democrats in demanding that President Trump address Russian interference in the 2016 election when he meets with Vladimir Putin Monday.

“President Trump needs to be discussing with [Putin] and holding him accountable for what is documented Russian interference in the basic process of democracy in this country,” says Dingell.

Last week, a special prosecutor indicted a dozen Russian government officials on charges they hacked email accounts belonging to top Democratic Party officials in 2016.

Grand Rapids
Steven Depolo / Flickr

Michigan members of Congress from both sides of the political aisle visited a refugee foster care facility in Grand Rapids today.

Democrats Debbie Dingell and Dan Kildee, along with Republican Bill Huizenga are urging the Trump administration to speed up the process of reuniting families separated at the southern border.

socialequality.com / http://socialequality.com/niles-niemuth/

Voters in Michigan's 12th Congressional District might see a member of the Socialist Equality Party on their ballots this November.

Niles Niemuth, who last ran as the Socialist candidate for Vice President in the 2016 presidential election, is petitioning to get on the ballot for this seat in the House of Representatives.

Democratic incumbent Debbie Dingell has held the congressional seat since 2015. She is running against Republican candidate Jeff Jones for the seat.

The 12th district is primarily made up of parts of Washtenaw and Wayne counties.

Families Belong Together protest in Columbus, Ohio.
Flickr user Becker1999

The Trump administration has adopted a "zero tolerance" policy toward anyone caught crossing the United States border. As a result, in the past six weeks alone, over 2,000 children have been separated from their parents and put in government custody or foster care.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell
Atlantic Council / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Two members of Congress, Republican Fred Upton and Democrat Debbie Dingell, are co-chairing a working group that’s tackling the issues related to school shootings and guns.

Dingell joined Stateside today to discuss that working group, and what she’s doing to avoid the “same old discussion” on guns.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Two Michigan members of Congress are taking a public stance in support of a Metro Detroit man facing deportation.

Ded Rranxburgaj, a native of Albania, entered the U.S. illegally in 2001. In January, he claimed sanctuary at Detroit’s Central United Methodist Church before he could be deported. The family, including two sons, has been living there ever since.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell
Courtesy https://debbiedingell.house.gov/about/full-bio

Michigan Congresswoman Debbie Dingell is speaking out about the allegations of sexual harassment against fellow Democratic Rep. John Conyers.

Conyers denies claims of inappropriate behavior, but has acknowledged he settled a sexual harassment complaint using his House office fund in 2015.

Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell, D-Michigan, joined local officials today in Ypsilanti to talk about President Trump's suggested cuts to Medicaid. Trump's proposed budget would eliminate nearly $700 billion from the federal program. Dingell spoke in front of community members and constituents at Community Alliance, an organization that serves developmentally disabled adults in Ypsilanti.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Access to health care for hundreds of thousands of Michiganders may be at risk as a federal funding deadline looms.

More than 40 community health centers provide care for 680,000 Michiganders. But federal funding for them expires this week. 

By one estimate, 100,000 Michiganders could lose their health care access almost immediately.

Donald Trump speaking at a rally in Fountain Hills, Arizona.
Gage Skidmore / wikimedia commons - CC BY-SA 3.0

The Trump administration is expected to release a NAFTA negotiation plan soon, which could have a large effect on Michigan's economy. NAFTA is opposed by many American workers, who say the plan has taken U.S. jobs to Mexico.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell, D-Michigan, says Trump's NAFTA plan should reflect the promises made during the campaign. In several states, including Michigan, Trump said he would pull the United States out of NAFTA. He has since decided to renegotiate.

David Sanchez and his son Benicio, who has Autism Spectrum Disoder.
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell spoke to some Michigan parents of children with special needs today about what a future without the Affordable Care Act would be like.

More specifically, Dingell talked about the possibility of those families losing Medicaid if the Senate Republican healthcare bill is passed.

The B's / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

U.S. Representatives Debbie Dingell and John Conyers joined other members of Congress today to speak out against anti-Sharia law marches planned across the country this weekend -- including two marches in Michigan.

Empty classroom
Kevin Wong / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Public education advocates and some Democrats are teaming up to convince President Trump to change his budget priorities.

The "Build Schools, Not Walls" campaign wants Trump to divert money and attention away from his plan to build a wall at the country's southern border and invest more in public education instead.

Raheel Siddiqui, a Pakistani-American Muslim from Taylor, was 11 days into his basic training with the United States Marine Corps on Parris Island in South Carolina when he died.
Courtesy of the Siddiqui family

“The physical evidence in this case tells the story of torture, abuse and suffering.”

That's the assertion of the lawyer representing the family of Raheel Siddiqui, a 20-year-old from Taylor who died while attending boot camp in South Carolina in March of 2016. According to the Marines, Siddiqui committed suicide by jumping 40 feet down a stairwell. 

His family is disputing those findings and now, his drill sergeant at Parris Island is facing charges.

One of the anchors used to hold Line 5 in place under the Straits of Mackinac.
Screen shot of a Ballard Marine inspection video / Enbridge Energy

Legislation has been introduced in Congress calling for a shut down of Enbridge's Line 5 if a federal study shows that it threatens the Great Lakes.

Line 5 is the controversial, 63 year-old underwater pipeline in the Straits of Mackinac.

The legislation would require the federal government to conduct a study to determine the economic and environmental risks to the Great Lakes from possible failures of Line 5, and it puts a 12 month deadline on completing the study.

Republican Dave Trott and Democrat Debbie Dingell are co-sponsors of the legislation.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell
Atlantic Council / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Are Bernie Sanders supporters ready to back Hillary Clinton as the Democrat’s presidential nominee? The answer seems unclear, as the Democratic National Convention’s opening ceremony had mixed responses coming from the crowd on Monday.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell welcomed last night’s DNC discourse with open arms because of its unscripted nature.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Congresswoman Debbie Dingell says Democratic National Committee chairwoman Debbie Wasserman-Schultz needed to resign her job. 

Revelations that the DNC under Wasserman-Schultz’ leadership tried to undermine Bernie Sanders’ campaign led to her announcement Sunday to step down.

Dingell says Wasserman-Schultz is a friend, but the Florida congresswoman had to go.

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