Detroit economy | Michigan Radio
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Detroit economy

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The city of Detroit should see a half percent to one percent increase in job growth in the next five years, according to a University of Michigan forecast.

That may not seem like much, but it's a faster pace than the forecast for the state's job growth. 

Elishia Jayye/Unsplash

There won’t be a national recession in the next couple of years, and Michigan should see some moderate job growth, continued low unemployment, and even a rise in local incomes. At least, that’s what economists from the University of Michigan are predicting in their big 2020 forecast, which they presented to Lansing in November.

University of Michigan

Nearly ten years after the Great Recession, an economist says the 2018 forecast is bright for Michigan -- as long as we don't compare it to places that are doing even better.

Tom Jackson is an economist with IHS Markit. He says Michigan will see job growth in computer programming and other high tech fields related to vehicle automation.

The state's economy also benefits from its strong public universities.

Just grade the state on a curve, he urges. Job growth will be more robust in southern states like Florida and Texas and Western states like Arizona and Nevada.

Lester Graham

In Detroit, jobs are scarce. Money is short.

That has led to an underground economy that one Detroit reporter calls a “gift economy.”

Valerie Vande Panne’s piece is titled “Life Without Money in Detroit’s Survival Economy.” 

USGS GLSC Dive Team, Michigan Sea Grant

There are 12 toxic hot spots in Michigan called Areas of Concern.

These are places in the Great Lakes basin where pollution and development have damaged the ecosystems.

The Detroit River is on this list. Before the Clean Water Act, industries on the river treated it as a dumping ground – think waste in the billions of gallons.

Paul Engstrom / Skillman Foundation

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan is asking Detroit area businesses to offer at least 5,000 summer jobs in 2015 to Detroit teens and young adults.

He addressed more than 100 business leaders yesterday at the Detroit Regional Chamber of Commerce.  

"For every dollar a business puts in to employ a young person, the mayor will match," said Kristen McDonald of the Skillman Foundation, one of the sponsors of the newly re-launched Grow Detroit's Young Talent program.