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Measles case in Detroit confirmed, says health department

Jul 19, 2019
3D rendering of the measles virus
Centers for Disease Control

The Detroit Health Department has confirmed a case of measles in Detroit. The person is a resident of Detroit, and had recently returned from traveling overseas. 

The person went to the emergency department at Children’s Hospital of Michigan on July 16 between 12:30 and 9:30 p.m.

They also went to their physician’s office in Macomb County, Michigan, and everyone who was exposed at that location was directly informed.

Lizzie Gapa / Flickr http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The Detroit Health Department is now bringing sexual health right to residents’ doorsteps with a new free mail-order condom program.

Any resident of Detroit, Hamtramck, or Highland Park can fill out a form on the Department’s website with their postal address and basic information. A few days later, a plain brown envelope containing 12 condoms will appear in their mail. Residents can reorder condoms as many times as they need.

Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

All the snow and cold and even a bum wrist from a recent fall didn’t stop Otis Lee from his mission to get vaccinated. Using a cane, Lee hobbled into the student center at the University of Detroit Mercy, where the Detroit Health Department has set up a vaccination clinic specifically for restaurant workers and food handlers.

Donnie Ray Jones / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Detroit is trying to do more to prevent premature births and infant deaths. The city outlined the new plan Wednesday.

Courtesy of the Detroit Health Department

Detroit activists are highlighting what they say is a growing public health crisis. Today they brought in medical experts from outside the city to discuss the potential health implications of mass water shutoffs in Detroit. They want a moratorium.

“There’s no question that access to safe and clean water from a health perspective is a top priority,” Detroit’s top health officer, Dr. Joneigh Khaldun said.

Courtesy of the Detroit Health Department

Lead poisoning and infant mortality are two of the biggest problems facing Michigan.

Roughly seven babies out of every thousand born in Michigan do not live to their first birthday. 

Inhalers
Jack Lawrence / Flickr Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

More than $1 million in foundation and state grants are going to the Detroit Health Department for five new initiatives aimed at addressing health problems of Detroit children, the Department announced today.

The goal is to reduce health barriers that interfere with school attendance and learning.

"We're focusing on a number of critical outcomes that really affect children's health and keep them out of the classroom and prevent them from being able to learn and, in the future, earn," said Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, executive director of the Detroit Health Department.

A repeatedly sewage-flooded basement on Detroit's east side.
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Two recent cases of Hepatitis A in Detroit are sparking a larger public health response.

That’s because the people who tested positive for the virus had both recently dealt with basement sewage backups, which have plagued an area of Detroit’s east side during rainfall this summer.

It’s not entirely clear how they got Hepatitis A, but contact with sewage is a known path of transmission.

But just in case, the Detroit health department will offer the vaccinations for free or at low cost to all Detroiters affected by the recent flooding over the next week.

Flickr user David Salafia/Flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The city of Detroit wants all its schools to test for lead in drinking water.

The Detroit Public Schools is already on board with the initiative, and has tested 60 schools so far.

But Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, the Detroit health department director, says the city won’t stop there.