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Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

President Donald Trump’s signing of the PPP Flexibility Act on Friday doesn’t immediately answer all the questions about loan forgiveness small business owners and their advocates have been asking for weeks.  

The further we get into growing season, the more complex life becomes for Michigan's farmers and farmworkers. They're trying to plant and harvest at a time when the world is moving in slow-motion, if at all. 

Artem Beliaikin / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, what will the impending re-opening of Michigan’s economy mean for public health. Plus, how the pandemic could allow districts to reshape learning in the fall.

Mike Petrucci / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, how one Detroit emergency room physician is searching for answers and solutions to handling the coronavirus pandemic. Plus, what would it mean to safely reopen the state.

Downtown Ann Arbor
Katie Raymond / Michigan Radio

Some politicians and businesses are pressuring Governor Gretchen Whitmer to reopen the economy. Republican legislative leaders have a plan to phase in business operations.  It’s very difficult to make an informed decision about opening the economy because no one has enough data to know exactly how risky it could be.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The unemployment rate is rising because people are losing their jobs due to the COVID-19 pandemic. But, there are new jobs opening up.

Retailers Wal-Mart and Amazon are looking for temporary workers. Fast food delivery services are hiring. Some pharmacies and medical supply companies need workers. Big chain supermarkets need people to keep the shelves stocked. In some cases small businesses are hiring too.

Ford Motor Co. sign
Mike Mozart / Flickr http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Today on Stateside, the Big Three auto companies are rolling back operations in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. What does that mean for the state's economy? Plus, we talk to faith leaders about how they are guiding their congregants during the uncertainty of the COVID-19 outbreak.

michigan quarter in a pile of change
calvste / Adobe Stock

The Michigan economy will continue to grow – but at a modest pace that won’t match the national economy’s growth rate. That determination comes from economists and state budget officials.

They met Friday at the state Capitol. Their job is to agree on revenue numbers that Governor Gretchen Whitmer and state lawmakers will use to put together the next state budget.

Ford Rouge Factory Tour in Dearborn
Nicole Yeary / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

One index of the Midwest economy is showing its lowest reading in a decade.

The Midwest Economy Index tracks 129 indicators in five states: Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa and Wisconsin. It’s released by the Chicago office of the Federal Reserve each month.

The reading for November was at -0.48, the lowest it’s been since 2009.

Elishia Jayye/Unsplash

There won’t be a national recession in the next couple of years, and Michigan should see some moderate job growth, continued low unemployment, and even a rise in local incomes. At least, that’s what economists from the University of Michigan are predicting in their big 2020 forecast, which they presented to Lansing in November.

time sheet on desk
designer491 / Adobe Stock

Governor Gretchen Whitmer says Michigan will change its labor rules to ensure almost 200,000 salaried workers become eligible for overtime pay. Her plan would make Michigan’s overtime rule more generous than the federal standard.

Two auto workers on an assembly line
AUTOMOTIVEAUTO.INFO

A recession may be on the way in the U.S. - and it may already have arrived in Michigan.

Charles Ballard is an economist at Michigan State University.

He says there has been essentially no job growth in Michigan in the first half of 2019.

Dollar General parking lot
Wikimedia Commons / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 

In 2010, there were 247 Dollar General stores in Michigan. Now there are more than 500. 

 

And many of the new stores are located in rural areas and small towns in Northern Michigan. 

Kaye LaFond / Michigan Radio

About 7,000 Michigan workers went through a layoff in 2018, according to data from the state. That number was about the same as in 2017.

The list doesn’t include everyone who lost a job for the year. And, overall, the state gained more jobs than it lost in 2018.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Economists are predicting Michigan’s economy will slow down in 2019.

Charles Ballard is an economist at Michigan State University. He says there are growing signs that the U.S. economy could be headed toward a recession.

“I’m not painting a picture that this is going to be 2009 all over again,” says Ballard. “But I do think caution would be warranted when we look forward to 2019.”

Ballard is concerned auto sales have plateaued. He does expect continued growth in Michigan’s health care and tourism industries.

hurricane michael satellite image
NOAA

This week, Stateside has been bringing you a series of conversations about the recent National Climate Assessment, a report compiled by 13 federal agencies that breaks down how climate change is projected to impact different regions of the United States.

Andrew Hoffman is a the Holcim Professor of Sustainable Enterprise at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business. He joined Stateside to talk about the risk climate change poses to the economy, and how that risk might help convince people skeptical about climate change to change their mind. 

Daniel Howes / Detroit News

Judging by conventional wisdom and all-knowing polls, President Donald Trump and his Republicans face a historic wipeout in the coming mid-term elections.

But if you accept the Clintonian notion that “it’s the economy, stupid” such thinking may be just a bit too conventional.

Haleem "Stringz" Rasul dances with Zimbabwe dancer Francis "Franco Slomo" Dhaka during a trip to Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe Cultural Centre of Detroit

On today’s Stateside, we answer your questions about what happens if Michigan voters legalize recreational marijuana. And, the story of broadcast executive and former Detroit Tigers owner John Fetzer’s exploration of new-age spiritual movements.

Jason Henry / The California Sunday Magazine

Some start-up tech companies are skipping the cutthroat atmosphere of Silicon Valley and instead opting for the Midwest.

Matthew Shaer wrote an article about that trend for The California Sunday Magazine. He joined Stateside to discuss what attracts tech companies to the Midwest, what differentiates Midwestern tech culture from that of Silicon Valley, and how the tech boom is reshaping the Midwestern economy.

Job application and pen
flazingo.com / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

When it comes to unemployment insurance, Michigan is the worst state in the Midwest for unemployed workers. A recent report from the Michigan League for Public Policy says the maximum benefits paid to the state's unemployed workers are the lowest in the region.

This Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry talk about what Michigan needs to do to clean up its act.


Courtesy of Tim Mroz

The Next Idea

West Michigan is one of the most economically healthy regions in our state. It’s been cited as the fifth fastest-growing city in the country.

By digging into what’s made West Michigan such a good place for businesses to take root and grow, other communities might find something to learn.

user clarita / morguefile

What happens to the state’s economy when 600,000 more Michiganders get health insurance, thanks to the state’s Medicaid expansion – AKA the Health Michigan plan that’s part of the Affordable Care Act?

According to Dr. John Ayanian, professor and director of the Institute of Healthy Policy and Innovation the University of Michigan, you get about 30,000 new jobs a year.

Invoice
user miguelb / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The economy. It’s an election issue, a global issue, and, for most Americans, a personal issue.

Gaging how well the economy is doing can be very difficult for economists. Measuring economic success on the national level relies on the stock market, unemployment numbers, and wage growth.

But these measurements don’t always represent how Americans feel about the economy on a personal level.

To find out how people are feeling on a personal level, Marketplace and Edison Research have teamed up to develop the “Economic Anxiety Index.” 

user Mitchell Haindfield / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Homelessness in Michigan is dropping.

That's according to a 2015 report by Ending Homelessness in Michigan. They found the number of homeless residents decreased by 6% in Michigan to 69,163 people.

flickr user Gage Skidmore/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton made stops in Michigan this week to give their big economic speeches. 

Ken Sikkema and Susan Demas joined us today to talk about those speeches and how they might impact the presidential race.

Flickr/jnn1776 / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

For generations, the idea of the American Dream has fueled dreams, aspirations and accomplishments.Work hard and build a better life. Get ahead. And watch your children climb even farther up the ladder of success.

A recent NBC News online poll found that 57% of Americans believe the American Dream is dead.

Charles Ballard, Michigan State University economist, talks about what it means for the way we plan, spend, and work.

Courtesy of Daniel Howes / https://twitter.com/DanielHowes_TDN

This week, more than 20 of Michigan's top CEOs are on what you might call a field trip.

They're visiting Israel to discover what it took to transform that nation from virtually nothing into one of the most innovative economies in the world, all in the span of just 70 years.

Sticky note with "find job" written on it.
user Flazingo Photos / Flickr - http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

What will it take to get Michiganders into good jobs?

The Center for Michigan has spent the last year asking questions of more than 5,000 Michiganders for its "Getting to Work" public engagement campaign.

This is the sixth such public engagement campaign conducted by the non-profit and nonpartisan Center for Michigan.

This political cartoon was printed in 1812 in reaction to the newly drawn state senate election district of South Essex created by the Massachusetts Legislature to favor the Democratic-Republican Party candidates of Governor Elbridge Gerry.
Elkanah Tisdale / Boston Centinel, 1812

Michigan Radio and Public Sector Consultants conducted a poll of 600 likely voters from Aug. 4-8 about how they felt financially, possible changes in redistricting, and the potential legalization of recreational marijuana.

In terms of those saying they're better off, Jeff Williams, CEO of Public Sector Consultants says things look relatively "rosy" for Michigan. More than half say they're "about the same," and around a quarter of them say they're "better off."

According to Brian Connors, China has already invested over $3 billion in Michigan’s economy, and that is expected to increase over the next decade.
flickr user Osrin / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

    

It has been a wild ride on Wall Street this week and it's only Tuesday.

On Monday, the Dow plummeted more than 1,000 points before closing the day down 3.6%.

Today, investors were in a buying mood and the Dow went up. 

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