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edenville dam

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Repair work on the Edenville Dam could begin as early as next week.

The dam failed back in May after days of heavy rain, contributing to a 500-year flood event in Midland and Gladwin counties.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

People living near the Edenville Dam will get an update Thursday night on state plans to make repairs to a portion of the dam that didn't fail in May.

Days of heavy rain led to the Edenville dam to fail back in May. Flood waters that washed through the breach inundated communities downstream, doing tens of millions of dollars in damage.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The state of Michigan will soon move forward with repairs to part of the remaining section of the Edenville Dam. 

The dam’s failure on May 19 contributed to a 500-year flood event that damaged thousands of homes and businesses.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new report says Michigan should invest more money and hire more staff in its dam safety office.

The failure of two dams back in May and the resulting record flooding along the Tittabawassee River led the state to commission an analysis of Michigan’s dam safety program. The analysis was made by experts from the Association of State Dam Safety Officials (ASDSO).

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan is getting millions of dollars from the federal government to repair roads damaged in the May floods.

The 500-year flood event damaged forced more than 10,000 people to evacuate their homes in Gladwin, Midland and Saginaw counties. Thousands of homes and businesses were damaged. The flood waters also washed away roads and bridges.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan regulators are ordering the owners of the Edenville dam to make critically needed repairs to the structure.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Thousands of lake front property owners in mid-Michigan may have to pay hundreds or potentially thousands of dollars a year to get their lakes back.

The Edenville and Sanford dams were overwhelmed after days of heavy rain back in May. The dam breaches helped create a 500-year flood along the Tittabawassee River that forced thousands to evacuate their homes in Midland, Gladwin and Saginaw counties.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new special task force will meet for the first time Tuesday to review state policy in the wake of the failure of two dams back in May.

More than ten thousand people were forced to evacuate following the failure of the Edenville and Sanford dams. The dams failed after days of heavy rain.

Thousands of homes and businesses in parts of Gladwin, Midland and Saginaw counties were damaged or destroyed in the 500 year flood event.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The state will try to order the company that owns the Edenville and Sanford Dams to fix failures that caused extensive flooding along the Tittawabassee River in May.

That action was announced Tuesday by the state Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE).

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The state will spearhead an engineering study to assess the condition of the remainder of a Midland County dam that failed in May.

The Edenville dam partially collapsed after heavy rains, along with the Sanford dam, leading to major flooding in and around Midland. But part of the dam facing the Tobacco River is still intact. The question is how stable and secure it is.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A company that owns two mid-Michigan dams that failed in May has filed for bankruptcy. The filings were made in the federal court in the Eastern District of Michigan.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

State senators are debating how much money needs to be spent on Michigan’s dams.

At a committee hearing on Tuesday, legislators heard how state regulators prioritize grant applications for repairing or removing aging dams.

State Senator Ed McBroom (R-Vulcan) has concerns that the needs of aquatic life play too big a role in deciding which projects receive grants.

“I’m appalled at the fact that safety concerns have to go through fisheries and get vetted by biology, rather than by public safety interests,” says McBroom.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

In the weeks since the Edenville Dam failed, and flooded Midland, the focus has been on why it failed.

But the people who live upstream from the dam also want to know when, or if, they’ll get their lake back.  

On a stormy morning last week, Robert Beltz stands on the green manicured lawn behind his beautiful two story home on Wixom Lake. The lawn extends to what used to be the water line.

“If you walk down toward the sea wall, and look down here, it looks like a desert,” Beltz said.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new report confirms that the Edenville Dam didn’t meet state standards before it failed in May.

The study was conducted by the Spicer Group, a Saginaw-based engineering firm, on behalf of the Four Lakes Task Force, a local group that was in the process of buying Edenville and three other dams at the time of the disaster.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A group representing Midland and Gladwin County residents wants an independent review of the failures of two dams last month that created historic flooding.

On May 19, after days of heavy rain, Edenville Dam broke, sending torrents of water downstream. The water overwhelmed the Sanford Dam. Thousands of people were forced to evacuate their homes in Midland County.

State of Michigan

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer plans to ask for a federal disaster declaration for parts of Michigan hard hit by flooding last month.

Heavy rains flooded towns and overflowed dams in parts of mid-Michigan, including Midland and Gladwin Counties. Thousands were forced to evacuate their homes as the Tittabawassee River rose to a record height. Weeks later, many people are still cleaning and repairing their homes and businesses. 

Clinton Snider / clintonsnider.com

This drone video was shot Friday May 22, 2020  at 7 p.m.

It was three days after the Edenville Dam collapsed due to high water.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s two U.S. Senators are calling for more regulation of privately owned dams, in the wake of this week’s massive flood on the Tittabawassee River.

Senators Debbie Stabenow and Gary Peters toured the flood zone Saturday by air and on the ground with local officials and FEMA’s regional administrator.

The failure of two privately owned dams Tuesday, after days of heavy rain, helped create the record setting flood on the Tittabawassee River that forced thousands to evacuate, and damaged homes, businesses, roads and bridges.