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elder care

Elderly woman
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A bill (S.B. 110) is working its way through the legislature that would help incapacitated adults whose caretakers are cutting them off from family and friends.

The bill would allow a court to appoint a guardian for the limited purpose of supervising the incapacitated individual's access to people they want to see or talk to.

elderly care giver
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A professional guardian is reacting to Michigan's new task force for monitoring guardianship of vulnerable adults.

Georgia Callis is with the Michigan Guardianship Association. She told Stateside the MGA hopes to educate the task force on how valuable public guardians are to the state.

elderly woman
Pixabay

The governor’s office, Legislature, attorney general’s office and the Michigan Supreme Court are joining forces to try and prevent the abuse of vulnerable and elderly adults.

The National Council on Aging estimates one in ten older adults are victims of elder abuse in the United States. It can be physical abuse, keeping people isolated, and even theft.

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As Michigan’s population ages, the state’s new budget will fund a study looking at better ways to pay for and run long-term care systems.

Area Agency on Aging of Northwestern Michigan Director, Heidi Gustine, cautions that the state is about to reach a tipping point, as more baby boomers reach retirement age.
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How do you know if nursing homes and assisted living communities are treating you or your loved ones properly, and what do you do if they’re not?

Elderly woman
Borya / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

A state investigation into a Kalamazoo nursing home’s plans to remove some residents has uncovered further problems there.

The state investigated the Upjohn Community Care Center after a number of complaints that residents were being forced out to accommodate the facility’s downsizing plans.

That investigation found violated laws protecting nursing home residents from eviction. It also found additional violations for “substandard quality of care.”

Elderly woman
Borya / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

How do you know if nursing homes, home health aides, and assisted living communities are treating you or your loved ones properly, and what do you do if they're not?

We'll have that conversation on Stateside soon, but first we need your questions.

Logan Martin / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

As America gets older, the question of who's going to care for Grandma and Grandpa becomes more complicated and more urgent. Consider this: the number of Americans over age 65 will more than double in less than 50 years.

Patricia Smith, a professor of economics at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, recently penned a piece for The Conversation that explores the future of “the daunting economics of elder care.”

An elderly Italian woman with Alzheimer's.
Eugenio Siri / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Every 66 seconds, someone in this country is diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease. It's the sixth leading cause of death in the United Stateside, and as our nation gets older, that incidence will increase.

A metro Detroit family is going public with allegations, and video, about abuse their elderly father suffered in a Livonia nursing home.

Hussein Younes and his six children are suing Livonia’s Autumnwood nursing home.

Courtesy of Kartemquin Films

Laura Checkoway just finished a film that is now being nominated for an Oscar. She’s the director, producer, and editor of a film called Edith+Eddie. It’s up for Best Documentary (Short Subject). She is from Ann Arbor.

Checkoway joined Stateside to discuss how she learned about Edith and Eddie, who at 96 and 95 are America’s oldest interracial newlyweds, how her film comments on America’s system of elder care, and what it feels like to receive an Oscar nomination.

Elderly woman
Borya / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

A plan to downsize a Kalamazoo nursing home that has some residents’ families and elder advocates crying foul is on hold for now, according to the facility’s CEO.

In January, the Harold and Grace Upjohn Community Care Center sent out a letter announcing imminent plans to downsize by 42 residents as part of a larger facility overhaul, saying some would have to "transition" to other locations.