Election 2020 | Michigan Radio
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Election 2020

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The U.S. House of Representatives is debating an article of impeachment against President Trump following the violence at the U.S. Capitol. The article charges Trump with incitement of insurrection.

The U.S. Capitol.
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The U.S. House of Representatives is taking up a resolution that would call on Vice President Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment and take over President Trump's duties. The effort comes as the House is also pursuing a second impeachment against the president over the insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6.

Updated at 11:29 p.m. ET

The House of Representatives approved a symbolic resolution urging Vice President Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment against President Trump, after the president's No. 2 has expressed that he would not exercise that option. The move comes nearly a week after violent pro-Trump extremists breached the U.S. Capitol.

Updated 5:45 p.m. ET

With nine days left before President Trump's term comes to an end, the House of Representatives is forging ahead with plans to try to remove the president from office over his role in his supporters' violent attack last week on the U.S. Capitol.

Police in Washington, D.C. arrested six people from Michigan following the insurrection attempt at the U.S. Capitol building.

Most of the arrests so far are for curfew violations. But one Michigan man was arrested for possessing a pistol and a “large capacity” ammunition clip, according to an arrest sheet from D.C. Metropolitan Police.

The U.S. Capitol building in front of a blue sky
PartTime Portraits / Unsplash

A top federal prosecutor in Michigan is urging people to give tips to the FBI if they are aware of people who joined a violent mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol in an attempt to overturn the presidential election.

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In the chaos at the U.S. Capitol Wednesday, Michigan Representative Debbie Dingell smelled tear gas, heard gun shots, felt "panic mode" kick in inside the House chamber, and benefitted from the kindness of others. 

After Congress certified President-elect Joe Biden's victory over President Donald Trump early Thursday morning, Dingell, D-Dearborn, spoke to Michigan Radio's Morning Edition about the scene as the pro-Trump mob stormed the Capitol.

Updated Friday at 12:05 a.m. ET

U.S. Capitol Police announced late Thursday that an officer hurt during this week's violent assault on the chambers of Congress by protesters loyal to President Trump has died from his injuries.

"At approximately 9:30 p.m. this evening (January 7, 2021), United States Capitol Police Officer Brian D. Sicknick passed away due to injuries sustained while on-duty," a statement from the U.S. Capitol Police said.

When a pro-Trump mob attacked the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, surprisingly few police stood in the way. Protests had been expected for days, but police appeared unprepared for an actual insurrection and not even prepared to keep all the doors locked. Video showed police calmly talking with attackers after they moved into the building.

Updated at 4 a.m. ET

Congress certified President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris' victory early on Thursday, the end of a long day and night marked by chaos and violence in Washington, D.C. Extremists emboldened by President Trump had sought to thwart the peaceful transfer of power that has been a hallmark of modern American history by staging a violent insurrection inside the U.S. Capitol.

Members of Congress are reconvening on Wednesday evening to continue the process of certifying President-elect Joe Biden's White House win, hours after violent insurrectionists stormed the U.S. Capitol, forcing party leadership to evacuate the scene while rioters overtook the complex.

The U.S. Capitol building
Jose Fontano / Unsplash

Chaos erupted at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, as supporters of President Trump breached the complex, bringing violence to the seat of America's federal government.

Updated at 11:45 p.m. ET

Congress reconvened Wednesday night to certify President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory, just hours after the U.S. Capitol was thrust into chaos by supporters of President Trump — an angry mob that breached the complex in an unprecedented violent act at the seat of America's federal government.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Several hundred Trump supporters gathered at the state capitol in Lansing, as Congress began to debate on the Electoral College results.

At times the event was more religious revival than political last stand.

“Father God release the angelic hosts of Heaven on behalf of your people,” said one speaker.

stateside blue and green logo with host april baer
Chettara T. Photography

If you didn't know already, our daily show, Stateside, recently revamped their sound to bring the important stories around our state into focus. Whether it’s the latest political news, interviews with artists and musicians,  or stories that just make you feel a little more connected to people around the state, the goal of the new podcast is to help you understand what's going on in Michigan, one conversation at a time. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The U.S. Attorney’s office in Detroit has filed criminal charges against a woman who allegedly threated a member of the Wayne County Board of Canvassers.

The FBI says Board chair Monica Palmer received photos of a mutilated body, a day after she had initially refused to certify local results in favor of Joe Biden. Palmer chaired a raucous meeting of the Wayne County Board of Canvassers on Nov. 17. Palmer and a fellow Republican on the board initially refused to certify local election results, typically a routine step. They later changed their position.

Inside the Michigan Capitol looking up at the dome.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, reviewing the year in Michigan politics. We take a look back at this hectic year for Governor Gretchen Whitmer and state lawmakers, and what 12 months of uninterrupted and often absurd political news does to a country. Plus, a peek into what 2021 could bring.

blonde woman, jennifer granholm
jennifergranholm.com

President-elect Joe Biden is nominating his former rival Pete Buttigieg as Secretary of Transportation and intends to choose former Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm as energy secretary.

Gary Eisen
gophouse.org

A Republican state lawmaker has lost his committee assignments for appearing to endorse violence as a possibility to block Monday's proceedings to award Michigan’s electoral votes to President-elect Joe Biden.

State Representative Gary Eisen (R-St. Clair) later said he was misunderstood. This is part of what Eisen said during an interview on WPHM-AM in Port Huron.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s 16 electoral votes will be formally awarded Monday to President-elect Joe Biden in a ceremony at the state Capitol. Other U.S. states and territories also convene their Electoral Colleges on Monday.

Update: 9:00 a.m., December 14 The state House and Senate office buildings in Lansing are closed because of "safety and security concerns."

A spokeswoman for Senate Majority leader Mike Shirkey said law enforcement recommended they close offices based on "credible threats of violence."

A collection of "I Voted" stickers
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The Michigan Bureau of Elections announced Wednesday it will conduct the most comprehensive election audit in state history.

The announcement comes after numerous unsubstantiated allegations of fraud and a protracted effort from both state and national Republicans to cast doubt on the integrity of Michigan’s election process.


"Vote here" sign
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Attorney General Dana Nessel filed a brief to the Texas lawsuit seeking to overturn the results of the 2020 election in four states including Michigan.

Updated Wednesday at 10:45 a.m. ET

In Michigan, the House of Representatives is being investigated by the Michigan Occupational Safety and Health Administration over violations to COVID-19 workplace regulations following an employee complaint.

Since the start of the pandemic, 11 Michigan state legislators and more than 30 legislative staffers have tested positive for coronavirus. Those numbers do not include Democratic Rep. Isaac Robinson who died of suspected COVID-19 on March 29.

rudy giuliani in front of a black and red background
Gage Skidmore / Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0

The Michigan House has canceled its voting session scheduled for Tuesday following an announcement that President Donald Trump's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani tested positive for the coronavirus.

Giuliani visited Lansing last Wednesday to testify for hours before a Republican-led committee investigating alleged election irregularities. Without wearing a mask, he pushed lawmakers to ignore the certification of Democrat Joe Biden's win over Trump and appoint electors.

Shikha Dalmia holds her head in her hand and looks up
Shikha Dalmia

President Donald Trump has defied many norms during his presidency. As his tenure in the Oval Office comes to a close, both the Republican and Democratic Parties have been considering the question: Where do we go from here?

rudy giuliani in front of a black and red background
Gage Skidmore / Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0

President Donald Trump’s top election lawyer appeared Wednesday in Lansing to testify before the state House Oversight Committee. The appearance by Rudy Giuliani was a last-ditch effort to try to reverse Trump's fate in Michigan. The state's election results have already been certified, showing President-elect Joe Biden as the winner.

The Senate Oversight Committee hearing into ballot counting at the TCF center in Detroit lasted seven hours. The hearing was filled with conspiracy theories and debunked claims.
Senate TV

In a conspiracy laden seven-hour hearing, Republican poll challengers and watchers testified in front of the Michigan Senate Oversight Committee. Despite accusations, they did not provide evidence of widespread voter fraud.

Dozens of mostly aggrieved Republicans testified Tuesday. Many raised concerns with the ballot counting process at the TCF Center in Detroit and said they were harassed by election workers.

Two older white men holding a sign that says "I miss the America I grew up in"
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, now that Michigan's ballots have been counted, political demographers are examining the state's 2020 election results. An expert at the Brookings Institute talked to us about how and where support for President Donald Trump formed roots in Michigan—and whether it's likely to continue after he leaves office. Also, we revisit a conversation about parenting amid the COVID-19 pandemic and talk to a Detroit hip-hop artist about breaking the mold in a city rich with talent.

A photo of John James
Courtesy Photo / johnjamesforsenate.com

Republican John James has conceded to Democratic Senator Gary Peters of Michigan, nearly three weeks after the incumbent was declared the winner by The Associated Press. James, who lost by 92,000 votes - or 1.7 percentage points - congratulated Peters on his reelection in a video posted to social media Tuesday, a day after the bipartisan state election board confirmed the results. The James campaign had unsuccessfully asked the canvassers to delay certification to audit votes in the Democratic stronghold of Wayne County, home to Detroit.

android phone on wooden table
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Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel says her office is investigating threats against election officials in Wayne County, where two Republicans voted against certifying the results last week before reversing course.

Monica Palmer, the chair of the county's canvassing board, told state canvassers that she was sent graphic text messages threatening her daughter and saying "my entire family should be fearful for our lives."

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