excessive heat | Michigan Radio
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excessive heat

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Many cities across the southern part of Michigan have a projected heat index of over 100 starting Thursday and lasting through Saturday. 

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention advises the public to drink more water than usual, and not to wait until thirsty during times of extreme heat. Other tips include wearing light-weight, light-colored, and loose-fitting clothes. 

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Michigan is in for a heat wave.  

Weather forecasters say most of southern lower Michigan will be under a heat advisory from Thursday through Saturday, with a heat index well over 100 for many cities.

The heat index combines temperature with humidity to describe how hot it will actually feel.

Brian Wheeler is a spokesman for Consumers Energy.  He says the electric grid is in good shape, and MISO (the grid operator for Michigan) estimates there will be adequate power reserves to meet 2019 summer peak demand.

Bridge: Think it’s hot now? Michigan’s 90° days could quadruple in 20 years

Jul 16, 2019
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All 83 counties in Michigan are getting hotter, and a report released Tuesday predicts it will only get worse, as the number of days with heat indexes over 90 degrees will quadruple in the next 20 years.

The report from the Union of Concerned Scientists, a Massachusetts-based nonprofit science advocacy group, predicts extreme temperatures will soar nationwide if nothing is done to curb climate change.

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As Tropical Storm Barry weakens and makes its way north from Louisiana, rain and waves of high heat will be impacting Michigan’s weather. Residents in the lower half of Michigan will see an increase in humidity levels and temperatures over 90 degrees.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Excessive heat is settling in over much of Michigan.  Temperatures are expected to soar well into the 90s this weekend. 

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No matter where you go in Michigan this week, it seems the hot weather is a prime topic of conversation.

When you pop your head out of the door first thing in the morning and it's already 83 degrees and there's nowhere to go but up, that is some hot weather.

We wondered how this week fit into Michigan's "hot weather history," so we turned to MLive meteorologist Mark Torregrossa. He also has the website farmerweather.com which will give you everything you want to know about the weather.

Listen to the full interview above.

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The National Weather Service issued a heat advisory warning for over 50 counties in Michigan beginning Tuesday, July 16 at noon and running through Wednesday, July 17 until midnight.

Heat indices predict temperatures could reach nearly 100-102 degrees between 1 and 6 pm both days in some counties.

The NWS suggests taking the following precautions:

  • Drink plenty of water
  • Stay out of the sun
  • If possible, stay in an air-conditioned building
  • Don't leave children or pets unattended in vehicles under any circumstances
  • Reschedule strenuous activity for the early morning or in the evening
  • Wear loose or light clothing

Air Conditioner
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A day of triple-digit temperatures is forecast for much of southern Michigan, leading school officials in Detroit and Flint to cancel activities.

The National Weather Service says today's high should reach 101-105 degrees in Detroit and 100-104 in Ann Arbor and Midland. Heat advisories have been issued for Michigan 53 lowermost counties.

It's just the latest in a string of scorching summer days in the state.

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Nearly 150,000 Michiganders are sweating through today without electricity.

Severe storms earlier this week knocked out power to more than 400,000 Michigan utility customers.

Spokesmen for DTE and Consumers Energy say it may be late Saturday or early Sunday before all the electricity is restored.

Dan Bishop is a spokesman for Consumers Energy. He says utility crews expect to make a lot of progress today, despite having to work in temperatures around 100 degrees.

“The heat is obviously the story of the day,” says Bishop. “The most important concern for us is to make sure our crews are well hydrated and working safely.”

Consumers Energy is getting some extra help from linemen from Missouri and Indiana.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Sweltering temperatures are becoming life-threatening in some parts of Michigan.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

The hot weather is not stopping most Michiganders from getting out and enjoying Independence Day.  

But organizers of many of today’s events are concerned.