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Families & Community

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The 15th annual West Michigan Girls on the Run event will take place Saturday, May 18th.

The 5k run is expected to include more than 1,700 girls and 1,000 runners from the community. Girls in the program range in age from third to eighth grades. Almost 500 volunteers help run the program.

Morgan McCaul
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Morgan McCaul was looking to start something.

Currently a rising junior studying at the University of Michigan, she has been in activism circles for years now. McCaul has appeared on local news, panels, and was even a speaker for this year’s Ann Arbor Women’s March, specifically in promoting awareness of sexual and domestic violence.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Lansing held a ceremony this week to celebrate an end to veteran homelessness in the Capitol City.

The Lansing, East Lansing and Ingham County Continuum of Care, the Capitol Region Housing Collaborative (CRHC), was recently recognized by the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH), Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) as “effectively ending” homelessness among veterans.

Photo of the shoreline on Lake Michigan.
Isabella Isaacs-Thomas / Michigan Radio

The environmental justice movement aims to address the disproportionate impact that environmental degradation has on people of color, the economically disadvantaged, and indigenous groups. 

Mustafa Santiago Ali spent more than two decades at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency working to fight air, water, and industrial pollution in those marginalized communities.

Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Immigrant’s rights marches are planned for Wednesday in Detroit, Ann Arbor, Kalamazoo and Grand Rapids.

Demonstrators are calling for the state to issue driver’s licenses for undocumented immigrants. The annual marches have drawn thousands of people into the streets in years past.

This year, the city of Grand Rapids is threatening arrests if demonstrators block traffic as they have in previous years.

Baby's breath, an invasive flower affecting the Great Lakes sand dunes
Sarah Lamar

Today on Stateside, a Wayne State University law professor remembers Judge Damon Keith, the longest-serving black judge in American history who died Sunday at age 96. Plus, why the popular flower baby’s breath poses a threat to the coastal sand dunes of the Great Lakes.

The untold history of Yemeni sailors on the Great Lakes

Apr 29, 2019
Group of Yemeni sailors interviewed during Howell's class
Razi Jafri / Michigan Radio

Our state is home to the nation's largest population of Yemeni Americans. But what attracted Yemeni immigrants to Michigan in the first place?

For many, the driver was economic opportunity, particularly the kind that could be found while sailing the Great Lakes.

courtesy Movimiento Cosecha GR

Two years ago, we shared with you the story of a young immigrant in Grand Rapids.

Brandon Reyes is part of a generation of immigrants known as dreamers, who arrived in the United States as children.

Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

Margaret Lewis is a retired court reporter who lives in a big, older home in Highland Park -- the kind you say has "good bones," because it needs some work. 

She's on a fixed income, and she's done just about everything she can think of to lower her utility bills. 

One winter she even turned the thermostat down to 50 degrees.

kids standing outside
Simon.com / Creative Commons

Michigan continues to see an increase in cases of child abuse and neglect.

That's according to latest Kids Count in Michigan Data Book released Tuesday by the Michigan League for Public Policy.

person with head in hands looking at eviction notice
Nito / Adobe Stock

Tenants who try to fight an eviction can quickly get caught up in bewildering legal issues. According to recent reporting from The Detroit News's Christine MacDonald, only 4.4% of renters show up in court with a lawyer. That’s compared to the 83% of landlords who have legal representation in eviction cases.

That has some housing advocates calling on the city of Detroit to provide attorneys to renters who have been evicted.

Actors on stage during a performance of Flint, the play.
Michigan Photography

Stories of Flint's water crisis have been reported on in documentaries, magazines, newspapers, and on television and radio.  

But José Casas, assistant professor at the University of Michigan School of Music, Theater, and Dance, has found a new way to tell the stories of Flint residents — using theater.

minimum wage
Adobe Stock

The state's new minimum wage and earned sick time laws take effect today. But there’s lingering controversy about how the measures made it into law.

Lawmakers adopted the ballot questions before they could go to voters – and then made significant changes before sending them to then-governor Rick Snyder for his signature.

“It’s not a true victory,” said Danielle Atkinson, a leader of the campaign to change the state’s sick time laws.” It’s not what the people of Michigan asked for, wanted or need.”

A map made of toe tags representing undocumented migrants who died in the Sonoran Desert is part of the museum exhibit Hostile Terrian 94, created by University of Michigan anthropologist Jason De León.
Daniel Lopez / Undocumented Migration Project

Today on Stateside, we speak with two Oakland County public health officials about the measles outbreak there, and what residents can do to protect themselves and their children. Plus, a look at proposed reforms to Michigan's guardianship system for elderly and incapacitated adults. 

Today on Stateside, despite an upward economic trend in Michigan, nearly half of households in the state are struggling to afford basic necessities. Plus, it’s (finally) spring! We hear about the cultural significance of this transition for different cultural groups across the state.

a sample of poison wallpaper - it's light green with blue stripes and floral decoration
Courtesy of Michigan History Center

Today on Stateside, despite an upward economic trend in Michigan, nearly half of households in the state are struggling to afford basic necessities. Plus, it’s (finally) spring! We hear about the cultural significance of this transition for different cultural groups across the state.

profile shot of Gretchen Whitmer
Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer is traveling the state to sell her plan to raise the gas tax by 45 cents per gallon. The fuel tax increase would go to fix roads, and to stop using the state General Fund for that purpose.   

The governor says the current plan has not kept pace with wear and tear on roads. She says that’s cost drivers more in repairs and deprived the state of economic opportunities.

Whitmer says calling for a tax increase is a last resort.

Kenn Goodman / Pravda Records Archives

Andre Williams, an R&B musician who got his commercial start in Detroit, died Sunday in Chicago. He was 82.

Williams moved from Alabama to Detroit in the 1950s,  and recorded radio hits like "Bacon Fat" with Fortune Records.

Dayron Villaverde / pixabay

Governor Whitmer says she agrees with a federal judge that a computer system that’s supposed to help kids in foster care needs to be fixed or scrapped.

A report to a federal judge says the problems include drastically undercounting the number of kids who were abused while they were supposed to be under state protection.

frankieleon / flickr

Michigan’s cash bail system needs an overhaul. That’s the message of bipartisan legislation introduced in the state House and Senate.

Representative Tommy Brann (R-Wyoming) wants to get rid of the requirement that parents who owe back child support pay bail to get out jail before they see a judge.

 

“Being in jail they cannot pay the child support,” Brann said. “So it’s just a vicious circle for them so I just want to give them a chance to get out fast, get back to work so they can still pay their child support, try to get caught up on this.”

CBP agent checking in young children
Customs and Border Protection / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Close up of line outside of New Palace Bakery in Hamtramck
Razi Jafri

Today, New Orleans is celebrating Fat Tuesday, also known as "Mardi Gras" in French. It's the last day before Ash Wednesday and the forty days of Lent, when many observers give up certain indulgences in anticipation of Easter Sunday. 

Michigan clergy react to United Methodist Church vote to keep ban on same-sex marriage
Flickr CC

Delegates from the United Methodist Church voted Tuesday to continue a ban on same-sex marriage and gay and lesbian clergy.

The proposal - called the Traditional Plan - was approved by church members at the United Methodist General Conference in St. Louis.

Anita Gonzales and Colleen Medicine
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, a new plan to boost Detroit says restoring the city's African-American middle class is key to a successful revitalization effort. Plus, we hear about the Anishinaabe Theatre Exchange, a program that draws on indigenous storytelling traditions to talk about current social issues.

People looking at their phones.
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, Michigan's new cyberbullying law goes into effect next month, but will it actually make kids safer from online harassment? Plus, a recent study from the University of Michigan finds that tens of thousands of Michigan kids and teens aren't getting the mental health treatment they need. 

a picture of Zena and Mena Nasiri against a brick wall
Razi Jafri / Michigan Radio

Dustin Dwyer / Michigan Radio

William Thomas opens the front door of his house on the south side of Benton Harbor and leads the way to the kitchen.

He has a white goatee, and he has on a dark grey collared shirt and gold rimmed glasses.

He sits down at a round table with a stack of papers stuck to a clipboard. He pulls one out, a white sheet that was sent to him in the mail last fall.

Public Domain

Eight children and teens die by firearms every day in the United States. 

That's according to a recently-published study examining the leading causes of child and teen death in the country. 

Henry Ford
Wikimedia Commons

Update, February 1, 2019, 10:26 a.m.:

Deadline Detroit reported Thursday that Dearborn Mayor Jack O'Reilly, who refused to send out the issue of The Dearborn Historian because of Bill McGraw's story, has now fired McGraw as editor of the magazine. 

They also report that the Dearborn Historical Commission passed a resolution Thursday night in support of McGraw and his article. However, the resolution is not "binding on the mayor." 

Original post:

He's known for ushering in the five-dollar workday, the auto assembly line, and the Model T.

100 years ago this month, Henry Ford also bought his hometown newspaper, The Dearborn Independent, and used it as a platform to promote his anti-Semitic views.

Journalist Bill McGraw published a story on this topic in Deadline Detroit and joined Stateside today. He says Ford’s anti-Semitic views drew on hundreds of years of harmful stereotypes.

A platter of various foods
Gigi Diaz

Cannabis, it turns out, is not just for smoking.

Since its legalization for both medical and recreational purposes, marijuana has been making its way into kitchens across Michigan, including the kitchen of Gigi Diaz. 

Diaz has been cooking professionally for years and recently, she’s started making cannabis-infused meals. She even won Best Chef at the 2017 High Times Michigan Cannabis Cup. Her business, Cannabis Concepts, does regular pop-ups all around Detroit.

“It’s really come a long way since your average pot brownie,” Diaz said.

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