Fisheries | Michigan Radio
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Fisheries

basketball hoop with falling basketball
Markus Spiske / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, after the Capitol insurrection on January 6, some immigrants are feeling unsettled by the kind of political instability they once fled. Plus, we’ll take a look at the role a UAW leader played in tying organized labor to a broader movement for civil rights. And, could COVID-19 sideline college basketball tournaments… again?

Ryan Hagerty / U.S Fish and Wildlife Service

For decades, researchers have been trying to bring back this iconic fish to Michigan—the arctic grayling—without success. Now, more than 50 collaborators across Michigan think they’ve finally figured out what makes this fish tick. And they're hoping that means this next attempt at bringing back the arctic grayling has a shot at success. 

The Great Lakes fishery lost an estimated $50 million from the pandemic.
CREDIT T. LAWRENCE, GREAT LAKES FISHERY COMMISSION

The nationwide shutdown was especially ill-timed for fishers in the Great Lakes.

Many deal in lake whitefish, a species that dwells in cold waters. The first window to catch these fish falls after the ice melts, before the water warms up — just when the pandemic began to overwhelm the nation.

People stand in the water, holding both ends of a large net.
Kaye LaFond / Michigan Radio

A new nonprofit is training citizen scientists to collect data on fish in the Great Lakes. They think it could be a game-changer for research in the region, and even help prevent the establishment of invasive species.

A dead fish lies on the grass.
Michigan Department of Natural Resources

Largemouth bass virus has been found in two more northern Michigan lakes. Samples from Beaver Lake in Alpena County and Avalon Lake in Montmorency County have tested positive. This follows a recent discovery of the disease in Cedar Lake in Iosco County. Both Beaver Lake and Cedar Lake have now seen fish kills related to LMBV.