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flint fire stations

According to Eric Lupher, cities, towns and villages pooling resources could help make services more affordable.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The city of Flint is hiring nearly three dozen new firemen.

A $3.7 million federal grant is paying to replenish a department that has seen more than 30 retirements and other departures in the past few years.

“Our firefighters have been doing an outstanding job with … so few firefighters on duty,” says Flint Fire Chief Raymond Barton, “Just imagine what they can do if you almost double [the number responding to calls].”

Flint officials hope to fill the new firefighter jobs with city residents over the next six months.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The cost of the state’s day-to-day response to the Flint water crisis could soon rise sharply.

It cost of the state of Michigan $29,300 a day to provide water resources to Flint residents in May. But that number may nearly quadruple, to $117,400, if and when the federal government ends its support.

The federal government has been picking up roughly 75% of the cost of emergency supplies and home testing. The president’s federal emergency declaration is set to expire August 14.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan National Guardsmen are no longer handing out water at Flint fire stations. The last one shut down today.

Demand remains so high that Flint Fire Station No. 3 ran out of water hours before its scheduled noon closing as a water distribution site.   

Taniesha Williams came away empty-handed when she stopped by the station around 10 a.m.

“It’s not right and it’s not fair. We really need help,” Williams said as she walked away.    

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan National Guardsmen are no longer distributing bottled water at three Flint fire stations as part of the state response to the water crisis.  

Just before noon, guardsmen loaded pallets of the cases of bottled water onto trucks behind Flint Fire Station #8. 

For months, this was one of five Flint fire stations where residents went to pick up bottled water and filters.  But the city is transitioning to nine neighborhood giveaway sites manned by paid employees.

Staff Sergeant Thomas Vega says it’s a sign of progress in the Flint water crisis.