Flint water crisis | Michigan Radio
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Flint water crisis

Scroll through all of our coverage of the Flint water crisis below. And you can find our special series Not Safe to Drink here.

City of Flint Water Plant
Adobe Stock

This post has been updated with new information about the testing of Flint's water.

Five years ago, the city of Flint switched its water to the Flint River. Citizens soon complained of dirty, foul-smelling water. Doctors found evidence of high lead levels in children. Outside researchers proved the city’s water (because of a lack of corrosion control) was corroding pipes, bacteria levels skyrocketed, and thousands of people were without clean water.

children sitting on floor
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Kids in Flint are heading back to school Wednesday, as the district transitions to a year-round calendar.

It’s an increasingly popular model with a mixed track record, but school leaders in Flint say they’ve had some success with the “balanced calendar” already in one of the district’s elementary schools. And it’s worth trying, says Flint Community Schools Superintendent Derrick Lopez, if it can reduce summer brain drain and help instructors reach struggling students sooner. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Another day, another Democratic presidential candidate comes to Flint to talk about water.

In recent weeks, U.S. Sen. Cory Booker (NJ), U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (NY) and former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (TX) made campaign stops in the Vehicle City. Monday was Washington Gov. Jay Inslee’s turn.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A pair of Democratic presidential campaigns swung through Flint Wednesday.

Former Texas Congressman Beto O’Rourke spoke to an enthusiastic crowd at a downtown Flint office building.   

O’Rourke talked with the crowd about a variety of issues, including immigration and entrepreneurship.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Time is running out for an online fundraising campaign for a program that uses Flint teenagers to test their neighbors' tap water.

State Rep. James Lower
gophouse.org

A bipartisan group of lawmakers says state-appointed emergency managers have too much power invested in one person. Recently proposed legislation would replace that system with emergency management boards.

State Representative James Lower (R-Greenville) says the Flint water crisis revealed problems with giving one person so much authority.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

On Friday night, prosecutors tried to explain to frustrated Flint residents why they dropped all the remaining criminal charges in the Flint water crisis investigation.  

Two weeks ago, Solicitor General Fadwa Hammoud announced the state was dropping charges against eight current and former government officials linked to Flint’s water crisis. Seven others had previously reached plea deals.   

At Friday night’s town hall meeting in Flint, resident Claire McClinton described hearing that the charges were being dropped “like being hit in the back of the head with a two by four.” 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Attorneys say progress is being made toward potentially settling a class action lawsuit against the state in the Flint water crisis.

The lawsuit is seeking compensation for a variety of issues, including health problems and property damage related to the switch in the city’s water source back in 2014.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Prosecutors heading up the Flint water crisis criminal investigation will meet with city residents this week.

Friday’s town hall meeting will give residents a chance to better understand why prosecutors decided to drop charges against the remaining defendants in the water crisis probe.

protesters carrying signs
File photo / Michigan Radio

As President Trump ramps up his campaign, his deportation policy drew protests in Detroit this week. And a West Michigan congressman who called for impeachment proceedings against the president has faced a protest of his own.

Libertarian columnist Shikha Dalmia joined Michigan Radio Morning Edition host Doug Tribou to talk about those stories, and about Attorney General Dana Nessel's decision to dismiss all criminal charges from the Flint water crisis. 

The Flint water treatment plant
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Some of the state workers indicted as part of the Flint water crisis investigation may soon return to work.

Last week, state prosecutors dismissed charges against eight current and former government officials as they begin to reassess the investigation.

Sign that says Flint vehicle city
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 

 

Today on Stateside, Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel comments on the recent dismissal of charges against state officials and others for actions related to the Flint water crisis. Plus, an interview with the writer of an "Afrofuturistic techno choreo-poem" set in 3071 Detroit. 

One of the anchors used to hold Line 5 in place under the Straits of Mackinac.
Screen shot of a Ballard Marine inspection video / Enbridge Energy

 

Today on Stateside, prosecutors say they are dismissing all charges against eight people charged in connection to the Flint water crisis and starting the investigation from scratch. Plus, how autonomous "smart ships" could be part of the future of commerce and research on the Great Lakes. 

 

Protestor holding up a sign that says "Safe Water" at a Flint Water Crisis protest
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

After three years, the criminal probe into the Flint water crisis is back to square one.

The Flint Water Crisis prosecution team, working under the aegis of Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel, has dismissed without prejudice all pending criminal cases brought by the former Office of Special Counsel.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new culinary school opened its doors in downtown Flint today.

It’s part of the effort to revitalize the city.

Mott Community College’s Culinary Arts Institute is located in the heart of Flint’s downtown. The 36,000 square foot space is the former Woolworths building.  

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder
Gov. Rick Snyder

Authorities investigating Flint's water crisis have seized from storage the state-owned mobile devices of former Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder and 65 other current or former officials.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A jury is scheduled to hear closing arguments Tuesday in a federal whistleblower case involving Flint’s mayor and the city’s former administrator.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A judge is delaying a decision on whether to dismiss criminal charges against Michigan’s former state health department director.

three sandhill cranes on a grassy field
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, a federal court rules that Michigan must redraw its congressional and legislative maps before the 2020 election. How does that change both parties’ political calculus? Plus, a Michigan spin on a classic cocktail to warm you up on a drizzly spring weekend.

picture of 4 photos of the Flint River and the Flint water treatment plant.
Steve Carmody

 


Today, a special edition of Stateside: Flint, Five Years Later. The Flint water crisis is seen as one of the worst public health crises in history. Life will never be the same for the 100,000 people who trusted their state and city to provide clean, safe drinking water. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s governor says it’s going to take time to win back the trust of Flint residents, who were lied to during the city’s water crisis. 

Five years after the ill-fated switch of Flint’s drinking water source, the city’s residents remain wary of the water flowing from their taps and politicians who claim it’s safe to drink.

flint mayor karen weaver
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

It's been five years since the city of Flint switched its drinking water source from Detroit's system to the Flint River. That decision that would kick off a years-long public health crisis and impact the health of the city's nearly 100,000 residents. 

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver, who was elected to that position in November 2015, joined Stateside to talk about the “tremendous progress” Flint has made since that fateful switch. 

construction crew at hole in the road
Eric Schwartz

On April 25, 2014, the city of Flint switched its water source to the Flint River without properly treating it. That damaged thousands of lead and galvanized water pipes which the city is replacing. 

In 2016, University of Michigan researchers developed an algorithm to determine the neighborhoods most likely to have lead pipes. The on-again, off-again use of the model has raised concerns about the efficiency of the city's pipe replacement program.

The Flint River.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Five years ago today, Flint’s drinking water source was switched, setting the stage for the city’s water crisis.  

The Flint water treatment plant
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

It has been five years since Flint’s water supply was switched, and the Flint water crisis began.

Since then, fifteen officials involved with the incident have been charged. The investigation has been active since 2015.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Several events are scheduled Thursday to look back at the beginning of the Flint water crisis. There’s also one looking forward.  

On April 25th, 2014, the city’s drinking water source was switched to the Flint River. But improperly treated river water damaged pipes, releasing lead into Flint’s drinking water.

picture of an old lead pipe.
Michigan History Center

 


On April 25th, 2014, officials switched Flint’s drinking water supply from the Detroit city system to the Flint River. Without proper corrosion control treatment, the river water corroded the city's pipes, leaching lead into the drinking water of thousands of Flint residents.

This Thursday will mark the fifth anniversary of that historic moment for Flint. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The City of Flint is getting a nearly $80 million loan from the state to fix its water infrastructure.

The zero interest loan will fund the completion of a secondary water source pipeline, pump station improvements, replacing water mains and improved water quality monitoring.

lead service line held by worker
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Attorneys representing groups that sued to force the replacement of Flint’s lead service lines expect the job will get done this year.

Earlier this week, the city of Flint awarded contracts to replace the lead and galvanized pipes connecting homes to city water mains. It’s the final phase of a project started at the height of Flint’s water crisis. The pipes were a primary source of lead in Flint’s drinking water.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Monday night, the Flint city council signed off on the final phase of the city’s lead pipe replacement project.

The council approved contracts with two companies to inspect four to eight thousand service lines between now and the end of July. The contractors will replace any lead service lines connecting homes to city water mains. The work could begin as early as next week.

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