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gun control

no gun sign on glass door
Bumble Dee / Adobe Stock

A state lawmaker says she felt “forced” by the Speaker of the House to remove a gun free zone sign from her state House office. Democratic State Representative Kara Hope (D-Holt) put up the sign last month. She says for the safety and comfort of her staff, she didn’t want any firearms in her office.

Meijer

Meijer posted its request on Twitter in a two sentence statement on Monday afternoon.

It says visible firearms can make customers and employees feel in danger.

The company's new policy does not address concealed firearms and it does not ban openly carried ones.

Group of dancers on stage during  "Now That I Can Dance — Motown 1962"
Courtesy of the Mosaic Youth Theatre

 

 

Today on Stateside, we talk to a state senator who wants to see Michigan enact so-called "red flag laws," which allow police to seize firearms from those deemed a threat to themselves or others. Plus, Detroit’s Mosaic Youth Theatre revives one of its most popular productions in honor of Motown Records' 60th birthday.

 

8 guns laid out on beige carpet
Joshua Shearn / Wikimedia Commons / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 

Lawmakers are pushing for stricter gun regulations following this weekend’s two mass shootings in Dayton, Ohio and El Paso, Texas.

Among them is state Senator Rosemary Bayer from Beverly Hills, Michigan. She’s introduced a package of gun control bills in the Michigan Senate. State Representative Robert Wittenberg has introduced matching bills in the House.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is ignoring Democrats' efforts to pressure him into calling the Senate back from recess to vote on gun legislation to expand background checks following back to back mass shootings.

But there is movement among some Republican lawmakers, who are calling for action on some gun control measures.

close up of trigger on a gun.
Wes / Adobe Stock

Governor Gretchen Whitmer says it’s possible to support the Second Amendment and be in favor of gun control, and she wants the state Legislature to act in the wake of the mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio.

Person preparing to throw a football
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, how should Congress respond in the aftermath of two mass shootings this weekend that left more than 30 people dead in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio? Plus, with the controversy surrounding CTE and other brain damage in professional football players, should parents be worried about their kid's safety in the sport? 

Miki Yoshihito / FLICKR - HTTP://BIT.LY/1XMSZCG

State representative Robert Wittenberg, D-Huntington Woods,  introduced gun legislation on Wednesday that he said will help prevent mass shootings and suicides.

Chrysler headquarters in Auburn Hills, Michigan.
User: fiatontheweb / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, the co-sponsor of a gun safety bill introduced in the Michigan House explains what his proposed legislation would do to address gun violence. Plus, how a Grand Rapids conference is helping people love and accept their bodies exactly as they are. 

DANIEL WEBER / FLICKR

A new University of Michigan study finds young people are supportive of more gun control and of guns.

The University of Michigan School of Public Health conducts a regular text message poll of young people, between the ages of 14 to 24 years old.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint Democrat Dan Kildee says it’s time for Congress to act to prevent future mass shootings.

By one count, there have been more than 150 mass shootings in the United States this year, including the recent deadly shooting at a Maryland newspaper.

“This is just becoming almost insanity,” says Kildee (D-Flint), “and Congress just completely fails to act.”

Ann Arbor Community High students Suephia Saam and Catherine Nicoli protest gun violence in schools in front of City Hall.
Catherine Shaffer / Michigan Radio

Michigan high school students participated in a nationwide school walkout to protest gun violence on the nineteenth anniversary of the Columbine school shooting Friday.

Students organized events at schools throughout the state. At Ann Arbor Pioneer High School, about two hundred students walked out of class and attended a student-led rally in the football stadium. Student speakers demanded tougher gun legislation, and blasted lawmakers for failing to pass popular, "common sense" measures like universal background checks. 

Handguns.
user Ben Re / Flickr

Republican state Senator Rick Jones says he’s working on bills to make it more difficult to rent hand guns at shooting ranges, and add some reporting requirements if a person trying to buy guns fails a background check.

Chiefly, Jones wants gun rentals to require a background check.  

guns in holsters on two people
Lucio Eastman - Free State Project - PorcFest 2009 / CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27373086

Governor Snyder released a plan yesterday to improve safety in Michigan schools following the Parkland, Florida school shooting.

His $20 million plan calls for boosting security at hundreds of schools, setting up a task force to come up with more ways to improve school security between now and the end of the year, more training for school administrators and school resource officers, and expanding the OK2SAY tip line.

The governor says he intentionally stayed away from guns.

School desks
Flickr user Frank Juarez/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Governor Rick Snyder released a plan Monday to improve school safety following the Parkland, Florida shootings.

The plan calls for boosting security at hundreds of schools, and expanding an anti-bullying tip line. A task force would also come up with more ways to improve school safety between now and the end of the year, when Governor Snyder steps down.

Snyder says these are things he believes could result in a consensus in Lansing.

The proposal also includes more active-shooter training for law enforcement, but does not include any plans directly related to guns.

Bill Huizenga
US Congress

Some high school students in West Michigan want U.S. Rep. Bill Huizenga to speak about gun violence.

A student-led group concerned with gun violence released a video today asking the Republican Huizenga to address the issue at a town hall.

A concealed carry weapon
aliengearholsters / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

With attention to gun control legislation at the forefront of the national conscience, the Michigan Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday over whether schools can trump state law to enact their own firearm restrictions.

Both Ann Arbor Public Schools and Clio Area School District are facing lawsuits by gun rights groups after banning weapons on school grounds in 2015 and 1996, respectively.

State law currently bans guns from weapon-free school zones; however, someone with a concealed pistol permit can enter school property with an openly holstered gun.

A young kid smiling, speaking with a politician in a suit
Tyler Scott

Democratic candidates for Michigan’s 11th Congressional District were cheered at a crowded town hall at a Library in Novi on Saturday for embracing gun control reform measures as a part of their campaign.

There were several of the so-called “Town Hall for Our Lives” events in Michigan, and dozens around the nation this weekend, continuing the heightened calls for gun control measures in the wake of February’s Parkland, Florida school shooting.

Michigan State University
John M. Quick / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Larry Nassar's former boss Dr. William Strampel has been charged with a felony and three misdemeanors. Strampel denies the charges. Michigan Radio's Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss new developments in the Michigan State University sex abuse case.

Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Marches for stricter gun laws happened all across Michigan and the U.S. Saturday.

About 2,000 people walked from the Hall of Justice to the State Capitol, carrying signs and chanting.

Their message was simple “Our kids aren’t safe, and that needs to change.”  

Another view of the guns and schools debate

Mar 19, 2018

Thousands of students in Michigan walked out of their classrooms last week to protest gun violence. They don’t want guns in schools, and they especially want assault rifles banned.

Personally, I would probably go even farther. I don’t think anyone should be allowed to own an assault rifle, except if it were kept under lock and key at a shooting range.

But the tragedy of the student protests is this:

Nobody wants to say this, but they aren’t going to go anywhere. The lobbyists of the NRA can count votes. They are mostly silent now, except for the stupidest among them.

Kayla Ford
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

All across the country, students and some teachers stood up at 10 a.m., walked out of their classrooms, and spent the next 17 minutes honoring the 17 people killed in the Parkland, Florida high school shooting.

Many schools in Michigan took part in this national school walkout, demanding action from lawmakers on school safety and guns.

Senator Gary Peters sits across a table from Stateside host Cynthia Canty.
Michigan Radio

The Trump administration has rolled out its plan to respond to violence and guns in our schools. It wants to provide firearms training to some teachers. But it has backed off on making major changes to gun legislation: For example, there’s nothing about raising the minimum age to buy guns from 18 to 21.

Following the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in Parkland, Florida, where 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz has admitted killing 17 people, President Trump said he was in favor of raising the minimum age but backed off after meeting with the National Rifle Association.

Joshua Livingston / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

When a young person commits a crime, one common response is to blame video games, especially violent video games, for the criminal act.

The recent mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida was no exception. On Thursday, President Trump will convene a meeting with video game industry leaders at the White House. The meeting will focus on whether violent video games contribute to real-world violence in our country.

Gun laws across the country are under the microscope at state capitols. And Michigan is no exception. But the reality is, we’re not seeing a re-thinking of gun policy. Instead, everyone’s just returned to their corners.

There’s increasing pressure for Lansing to do something following the school shootings in Parkland, Florida.

Lorie Shaull

The Oakland County sheriff's office says it's responded to five possible school shooting threats in the span of just five days.

Sheriff Mike Bouchard says it's not unusual to get more "copycat" threats after a school shooting like the recent one in Florida.

"It's sad,” he says. “It's incredibly sad to think that other people want to either emulate it, or get attention from it, or think it's ok."

Capitol Building in Lansing, MI
Matthileo / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

High schoolers, lawmakers, and concerned citizens held a rally at the state Capitol today. They want changes to the state’s gun laws.

The rally comes the week after the deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida where students and staff members were killed.

A gun lying on a table with bullets around it.
Daniel Weber / Flickr

State lawmakers might soon consider bills that would let courts temporarily take guns away from gun owners they considered to be dangerous to other people or themselves.

SCREENGRAB - NEWS4JAX / WWW.NEWS4JAX.COM

After 17 students were killed in a Florida school last week, some high school students in Kalamazoo decided they needed to do something.

Under the banner of “Students Fighting Guns Since Adults Won’t,” eight students drafted a petition and put it up on Change.org, a popular petition website.

A national teachers’ strike?

Feb 19, 2018
Jennifer Guerra / Michigan Radio

It’s been five days since the Valentine’s Day school shooting in Florida; the 17 dead are being buried, and the story is easing out of the headlines.

This weekend, writing a newspaper column, I started to refer to this as “our nation’s latest school shooting,” and caught myself. Better not say that, I realized.

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