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University of Michigan near Rackham and Michigan League
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

University of Michigan faculty and staff will soon be asked to use an app to monitor themselves for COVID-19 symptoms.

Dr. Robert Ernst is the executive director of the University Health Service.

He says the app, called ResponsiBLUE, will be available in the app store in the coming days. 

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Detroit area residents who are older than 50 tend to die earlier compared to people older than 50 in other parts of the state.

That’s according to a study from the Detroit Area Agency on Aging and researchers at Wayne State University.

 

JODI WESTRICK/MICHIGAN RADIO

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel says her office might bring charges against long-term care facilities that don’t follow an executive order designed to protect residents and staff. 

 

“Willful violations of this executive order are considered a misdemeanor offense, which carry a $500 fine and/or 90 days in jail,” read a Thursday press release

 

UNSPLASH

All but one of Michigan’s 21 regional hubs for nursing home patients recovering from COVID-19  have been cited for an infection-control deficiency in the last four years, according to data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. 

Four of those facilities were cited for infection-control violations that occurred in the weeks just before the state designated them as hubs. 

 

PAULETTE PARKER/MICHIGAN RADIO

Some of the first volunteers in a new COVID-19 vaccine trial received their injections at Henry Ford Health System on Wednesday.

Adobe Stock

Governor Gretchen Whitmer is extending the mask requirement to include children as young as two years old in some cases, after several coronavirus outbreaks linked to childcare centers and youth camps.

Gov. Whitmer says by requiring face coverings in her latest executive order, childcare centers and camps can remain open while keeping children and staff members safe.

Flickr Creative Commons/Sanofi Pasteur

Dr. Howard Markel, medical historian at the University of Michigan joined Stateside to talk about the history of vaccine development and what a coronavirus vaccine will and won't mean when it's finally ready.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The Michigan Farm Bureau has some concerns about a state emergency order that agricultural and food processing workers get tested for COVID-19.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services issued an emergency order on Monday.

MICHIGAN.GOV

Governor Gretchen Whitmer has vetoed a bill that would have had serious implications for nursing home residents recovering from COVID-19. 

Senator Peter Lucido (R-Shelby Charter Township) was the bill’s sponsor. He’s says that the governor’s policy of placing recovering COVID patients in so-called regional hubs has resulted in loss of lives. 

Eric Molina / CDC

The State of Michigan hopes a new initiative will reduce its growing Hepatitus C treatment costs for state prison inmates and people with Medicaid and Healthy Michigan Plan insurance. 

Chronic Hepatitis C is a serious liver infection that can result in cirrhosis or cancer. 

MICHIGAN.GOV

Governor Gretchen Whitmer says beginning Friday, indoor gatherings statewide will be limited to 10 people and bars will be closed for indoor service across the entire state, including in Regions 6 and 8 (the Traverse City area and the Upper Peninsula). 

Dr. Joneigh Khaldun at a news conference with Governor Gretchen Whitmer.
michigan.gov

More people are overdosing on opioids since the beginning of the pandemic. Dr. Joneigh Khaldun is the Chief Medical Executive for the State of Michigan. She says the number of Emergency Medical Services responses to opioid overdoses has jumped since the COVID-19 pandemic began.

“Between April to June, there was a 26 percent increase in E.M.S. responses for opioid overdoses compared to the same period of time in 2019," Khaldun explained.

3D rendering of coronavirus
donfiore / Adobe Stock

A Gladwin summer camp has been closed after reporting a coronavirus outbreak.

The Springs Ministries summer camp in Gladwin closed last week after two members tested positive for coronavirus.

Now, according to a Gladwin county health official as many as 28 attendees have tested positive for the virus.

PAULETTE PARKER/MICHIGAN RADIO

Henry Ford Health System will recruit up to 5,000 participants for a phase-three COVID-19 vaccine trial.

STEVE CARMODY / MICHIGAN RADIO

In late May, the Kalamazoo County Health Department joined what looked to be a promising COVID-19 testing effort. 

Working with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services and the state police, three-person teams from the Michigan National Guard fanned across the state, testing staff and residents in long-term care facilities, inmates in county jails, and thousands of individuals at temporary drive-through sites. 

 

REP. LESLIE LOVE

Michigan’s House of Representatives passed a bill on Wednesday that seeks to establish entirely separate facilities for nursing home residents with COVID-19. 

The state Senate has already voted in favor of the bill.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A Michigan congressman wants to see the United States Air Force focus more on cleaning up PFAS contamination at a former Air Force base in northern Michigan.

Representative Dan Kildee (D-Flint) says there's been too much focus on studying the problem.

THE U.S. CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

The number of people getting tested for COVID-19 in Michigan is on the rise. But in order to maintain quick turnaround times for results — a prerequisite for an effective public health response — some of the labs that process those tests are turning away new clients.

Last week, Michigan was completing more than 24,000 COVID-19 tests a day, based on a rolling 7-day average. At the start of July, average daily testing was less than 17,000.

A long table surrounded by red chairs in a school classroom.
BES Photos / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The union representing teachers at Ann Arbor Public Schools says it's not safe to return to in-person instruction.

In a Facebook post, the Ann Arbor Education Association is demanding that school be online only in the fall.  

Union leaders say many things would have to be in place before teachers are willing to teach inside school buildings, including a 14 day period of time in which there are no new COVID-19 cases in Washtenaw County. 

THE U.S. CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

Labs that process COVID-19 tests in Michigan are taking several days to get results back to nursing homes, according to the state health department.

More facilities are testing residents and staff in order to comply with a June directive from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. 

 

That order requires facilities with active COVID-19 cases to test staff and residents weekly until 14 days have passed since the last positive test. Facilities in medium to high-risk parts of the state — as of Friday, all of them — must test staff weekly, regardless of whether the virus has been detected. 

 

Hand holding homeade cloth masks
Vera Davidova / Unsplash

Take precautions to slow the spread of the coronavirus or risk a return to lockdown. That was the message from Governor Gretchen Whitmer and the state’s chief medical executive Dr. Joneigh Khaldun at a Thursday press conference. On Friday, Whitmer went a step further, signing a new executive order that makes mask-wearing mandatory in crowded public spaces. 

rollercoaster at Cedar Point
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Ah, to spend a hot summer day at the theme park. Roller coasters, funnel cakes and… face masks? For Cedar Point, an Ohio amusement park long beloved by Michiganders, that’s a hard yes—starting this weekend.

The number of new COVID-19 cases tied to an East Lansing bar is starting to wane.

Harper's Restaurant and Brewhub became infamous in June for drawing large crowds of young people, not wearing masks or social distancing. The bar is now closed. 

Black woman in therapy sits with her head in her hands as her therapist takes notes on a clipboard
Adobe Stock

Black Americans reported a significant spike in symptoms of anxiety and depression following the release of the video that showed a Minneapolis police officer kneeling on George Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes. 

“It’s important to understand that the killing of unarmed Black men—and Black people, period—it’s had a collective toll on our psyche,” said Napoleon Harrington, a therapist at Ambassador Counseling and Resource Group.

Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

Every weekday at 2 p.m., 81-year-old Gladys Acklin settles into her couch to watch the soap opera “General Hospital.” 

“We both like Sonny,” she says. “He’s the mobster.... And his hit man Jason. We like him too. We like all the crooks.” 

 

When Ms. Acklin says we, she’s including Jean Reinbold, a social worker, but also a friend. Since the lockdown began back in March, Reinbold has been calling Ms. Acklin, who lives alone, quite a lot. 

MDOC

Corrections officers at Gus Harrison Correctional Facility in Adrian are mourning the death of one of their own from COVID-19.

Randy Rumler worked at the facility for 24 years. His local union rep, Mike Lennox, says Rumler was a family man, who was always there to help when people needed help.  

Lennox says everyone who worked with him is shocked and upset.

An image of a pregnant lady lying in a hospital bed holding her tummy, with a close up on the drip in her hand
Adobe Stock

The past few months have focused national attention on systemic racism in American policing. But criminal justice is far from the only sector of American society that is touched by these problems. This summer, Stateside is launching a series of conversations about how racism in systemic, institutional, and everyday forms affects Black Americans. We’re starting with a discussion about health care where, as in policing, racism can be a matter of life or death. 

illustration of nurses and doctors wearing PPE
Kevin Kobsic / United Nations / Unsplash

Michigan’s COVID-19 caseload has been on a rollercoaster for the past few weeks. We spoke with Michigan's medical director Joneigh Khaldun for an update. Plus, researchers at Michigan State University are working on cultivating the ever elusive morel mushrooms. And, we kick off our summer series about how systemic racism shapes the world around us with a conversation about healthcare.

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