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 Detroit Medical Center, Harper Hospital and Hutzel Woman's Hospital.
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The Detroit Medical Center’s Harper University Hospital passed an important inspection this month.

Harper Hospital could’ve lost Medicare payments after a Dec. 13, 2018 inspection listed several violations, including failure to accurately record time of death for three patients, "resulting in the potential for the inability to recover tissue and/or organs for use in transplant."

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new Michigan State University study finds marijuana users gain less weight over time than those who don’t consume cannabis products.

The “munchies” have long been associated with marijuana use.

But MSU researchers say that doesn’t lead to serious weight gain.

In a study appearing in the International Journal of Epidemiology, the researchers reviewed the body mass records of more than 30,000 people over the age of 18.

Child with measles
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After declaring one case of measles a false positive last night, the Washtenaw County Health Department says today there is now a separate confirmed case of the measles, related to international travel.

An international visitor to the University of Michigan campus, who has now returned home, was confirmed as having the measles.

This latest case is not part of the current Michigan outbreak, but a new introduction of the virus.

It brings the total number of known measles cases in Southeast Michigan to 40.

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The measles outbreak continues, and the number of cases in Michighan is climbing. There are now 41 cases confirmed to date in Oakland, Wayne, and Washtenaw Counties.

Doctors and public health officials are grappling with how to best deal with this growing public health crisis, including how they should talk to parents who refuse or delay vaccinations. 

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Today on Stateside, three cardiologists are suing the Detroit Medical Center, citing alleged fraud and concerns over quality of care. We get the latest from the Detroit News reporter who has been following this story. Plus, we talk to staff at two small-town Michigan newspapers about what communities have to lose when local news sources go out of business. 

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Doctor Ted Schreiber is the third cardiologist in a week to file a civil lawsuit against the Detroit Medical Center and its parent company, Tenet Health Corporation.

Schreiber's attorney Stephanie Ottenwess says he raised a number of safety concerns after Texas-based Tenet Health Corporation bought the hospital in 2013.

The number of confirmed measles cases in Oakland County continues to rise. We talk to Oakland County Health Department's health officer Leigh-Anne Stafford, and Pamela Hackert, a physician with the department. They explain what residents need to know about the highly-contagious disease, and how they can protect themselves.

heart monitor during surgery
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A pair of cardiologists who were fired from their leadership positions at the Detroit Medical Center are suing the health system.

In a court filing, Drs. Amir Kaki and Mahir Elder say they were fired for raising concerns about problems affecting patient care, including dirty instruments, unnecessary procedures, and improper billing of Medicare and Medicaid. They claim some patients died because of incompetent staff and efforts to trim costs.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan doctors hope to use the measles outbreak in Oakland County to encourage parents to get more children vaccinated.

Michigan ranks near the middle of the pack among states for measles vaccination rates.

Area Agency on Aging of Northwestern Michigan Director, Heidi Gustine, cautions that the state is about to reach a tipping point, as more baby boomers reach retirement age.
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Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel plans to roll out a task force on Monday to develop a strategy to deal with the problem of elder abuse.

Kelly Rossman-McKinney is the attorney general’s communications director. She says an estimated 73,000 older people in Michigan are victims of some type of elder abuse. She says that number is probably on the low side because the scope of the problem isn’t known yet, and she says it takes many forms.

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Today on Stateside, we look at why people in rural parts of Michigan have difficulty accessing what many doctors consider the most effective treatment for opioid addiction. We also talk about the roots of Islamophobia in the United States, and the financial strain PFAS contamination puts on municipalities.

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State lawmakers want to give librarians immunity from any issues that could arise if they administer opioid overdose medication. A state House committee passed bills on Tuesday that would do that.

The quiet, secluded nature of libraries makes them an attractive place for some drug users to get their fix. Librarians can administer overdose medication like Narcan. But some don’t carry it because they could be sued if something goes wrong.

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Law enforcement in Michigan wants to make it illegal for minors to possess vaping products and for retailers to sell e-cigarettes to minors. But an ongoing debate in the state Legislature has police and prosecutors frustrated.

Former Governor Rick Snyder vetoed legislation to ban the sale and possession of e-cigarettes for minors.

He said e-cigarettes should be classified and regulated like tobacco instead. But now, lawmakers in Lansing are trying to – once again – focus on the sale, not the classification.

Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

Nestled among the Starbucks and CVS pharmacies on Greenfield Road and Ten Mile in Southfield and Oak Park are clusters of Orthodox synagogues, and Hebrew schools. 

There are delis and other other Jewish-owned businesses.

So it sure seems like the Israeli citizen, who was visiting after catching measles in New York, did his best to visit a lot of them, including a kosher grocery store, a yeshiva, and Congregation Yagdil Torah, where I meet David Shapero.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s administration is re-examining plans for a multi-million dollar psychiatric hospital in Michigan's Thumb region.

For more than 100 years, the Caro Center has been treating Michiganders with serious medical conditions.  Starting in 1914, the center provided treatment for people with epilepsy. The focus shifted to patients with psychiatric disorders in the 1950s.

American Sign Language for A - S - L
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Today on Stateside, Governor Whitmer announced a plan earlier this week to introduce a 45 cent gas tax by October 2020. Are there enough road workers to put all that funding to use? Plus, Ingham County is building a public defender office from the ground up. We talk about the challenges of developing a brand new governmental department. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s medical marijuana businesses are once again facing a deadline to get a state license or be forced to close their doors.

State regulators are proposing Michigan’s Medical Marihuana Licensing Board give businesses until the end of this month to get their license to operate.   

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Body image is something that people can wrestle with their entire lives. Being hypercritical of what you see in the mirror often starts when you’re young, and carries on throughout the rest of your life.

The Better Body Image Conference, taking place Saturday, March 2nd in Grand Rapids, aims to interrupt that self-critical voice about our bodies. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan State University researchers say they've found a cost-effective way to help prison inmates with depression.

Roughly a quarter of prison inmates released each year suffer from depression.  Often, the problem pre-dates their incarceration.

Inmates often go without adequate treatment while in prison. Many re-enter society with worse mental health problems than before they entered prison.

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Michigan Radio

Michigan's mental health care system isn't getting children the  help they need. 

The causes are varied  –  from a shortage of child and adolescent psychiatrists to the social stigma around getting treated for mental illness  – but many providers, parents, and advocates say we're reaching a crisis point. 

Now, some providers are trying to collaborate on solutions. 

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Michigan, like most of the country, is in desperate need of more child and adolescent psychiatrists.

A study released in February found that one in seven children in Michigan – more than 100,000 children in total – have been diagnosed with depression, anxiety, or ADHD, which are the three most common psychiatric disorders in people under the age of 18. 

The state had a total of just 239 psychiatrists trained to treat children and adolescents in 2017, according to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists. That works out to just 11 psychiatrists for every 100,000 children across the state.

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Where do you go, to whom do you turn if your child needs mental health care? Child psychiatrists and parents agree: the options in Michigan are too few and far between.

This issue has led to a class action lawsuit against the state's Department of Health and Human Services. It was filed in 2018 against then-Governor Snyder, and it alleges the state has failed to meet its legal obligation under Medicaid to provide adequate services for children who have behavioral and mental health problems.

Cyndi Sibley standing in front of a brick wall
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Parents of children with severe autism in Michigan have limited options when it comes to finding long-term care for their kids.

Credit Melinda Odisho

A danger to themselves or others. That’s the threshold set by Michigan law to put someone in a psychiatric hospital.

But many families with autistic children say meeting that definition doesn’t seem to be enough for their kids--and they don’t know what to do.

This is one family’s story.


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Tens of thousands of children in Michigan aren't getting the mental health treatment that they need, according to a recent report published in JAMA Pediatrics. 

University of Michigan researchers tracked the prevalence of three of the most common and treatable mental health disorders — depression, anxiety, and ADHD — among young people at both the national and state level. They also looked at how many of those kids and teens were getting treatment. 

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A new University of Michigan study finds that doctors frequently send discharged patients home with a prescription for risky antibiotics. That's even when the patients were taking less risky antibiotics in the hospital.

The study looked at people who were hospitalized for urinary tract infections or pneumonia.

The risky antibiotics include Ciprofloxacin (often just called Cipro), Leviquin and generic drugs ending in "floxacin."

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New work requirements for people in Michigan's Medicaid expansion group could cause as many as 183,000 people to lose their coverage.

Anywhere between 9 and 27 percent of the approximately 680,000 people enrolled in the Michigan Healthy Plan - or 61,000 to 183,000 recipients - could be kicked of the rolls.

fresh vegetables at a grocery store.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Preparations are underway for what could be a long gap between monthly benefits for some SNAP recipients.

Bob Wheaton is with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. He said the department is giving a heads up to organizations that they could see more people in need.

Nathan Bishop

People living near the Marathon refinery in southwest Detroit are calling for “more transparency” after a foul odor from the plant descended on surrounding neighborhoods Sunday.

The source of the odors was a malfunctioning flare gas system which allowed hydrogen sulfide and other compounds to be released into the air.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The latest testing shows the level of lead in Flint’s tap water has declined again.

Flint’s drinking water has been closely tested since the height of the city’s water crisis.   

In early 2016, the highest risk homes, with lead service lines, were testing at 20 parts per billion.  The federal action level for lead is 15 parts per billion. The latest testing found four parts per billion in the 90th percentile of the highest risk homes

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