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pads and tampons
Michigan Radio

People everywhere need access to pads, tampons, and other feminine hygiene products, but throughout Michigan, some women and people in the transgender community are forced to go without. It’s a global phenomenon known as “period poverty.”

Christine Mwangi is founder of Be a Rose, an organization working to fight period poverty in the Grand Rapids area. She joined Stateside to talk about her organization is expanding access to resources and information related to women’s health. 

MDHHS

The hepatitis A outbreak in Michigan has plateaued, but it's still an outbreak.

Eden Wells is the chief medical executive for the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A pilot program is giving Flint teenagers the opportunity to learn new skills, while helping city residents still too scared to trust their drinking water is safe.

Recent tests have shown the quality of Flint’s tap water has improved since the city’s water crisis started in 2014. However, many residents don’t believe those tests results from the government.

But under a new program, more than a dozen Flint teenagers are going into homes and testing the water.

Stateside 7.23.2018

Jul 23, 2018

Today on Stateside, how inequality and discrimination fueled an uprising in Grand Rapids, just days after riots began in Detroit. Plus, a University of Michigan pediatrician says that saying Flint's children have been poisoned by lead does more harm than good. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Centers for Disease Control (CDC) laboratorian George Gorman at left, along side Dr. Jim Feeley, while they were examining culture plates, i.e., Petri dishes, upon which the first environmental isolates of Legionella pneumophils had been grown.
Stafford Smith / Center for Disease Control / Wikimedia Commons

Health officials have reported a rise in cases of Legionnaires' disease this summer both nationally and here in Michigan. 

It's been 42 years since the first outbreak of the mystery disease that eventually became known as legionellosis — and it took some serious medical detective work to figure it out.

children sitting on floor
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Were the children of Flint "poisoned?”

It’s a word that gets tossed around a lot in connection to the lead exposure caused by Flint’s improperly treated drinking water.

But in an opinion piece published in Sunday’s New York Times, Dr. Hernán Gómez and co-author Kim Dietrich argue that saying Flint's children have been poisoned "unjustly stigmatizes their generation."

Stateside 7.19.2018

Jul 19, 2018

Today on Stateside, we talk to state senator and Republican gubernatorial candidate Patrick Colbeck about Medicaid reform, tax cuts, and controversial comments on a Democratic candidate. Plus, a former college football player who wants to change the culture around mental health among student athletes. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below:

This map shows areas of concern in the Oscoda area.  PFAs has been slowly spreading for the former U.S. Air Force base for decades.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Several Michigan members of Congress are sending a letter to the Trump administration requesting stronger safeguards for dangerous chemicals in drinking water.

A recent Harvard study found six million Americans are drinking water contaminated with a group of chemicals,  per- and polyfluoroalkyl chemicals, better known as PFAS.

The chemicals have been linked to an increased risk of liver damage and pregnancy problems, among other health issues.

Blacklegged tick
CDC

If you’re out in wooded or brushy areas this summer and want to avoid Lyme disease, here’s the advice of the day: Wear long sleeves and pants, and check yourself frequently for ticks, which spread the disease.

But for a time in the late 1990s and early 2000s, people had the option to take an even more preventative measure: They could get a Lyme disease vaccine.

Cindy Shebley / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The opioid crisis is taking a tragic toll on families nationwide. According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than 64,000 Americans died from drug overdoses in 2016, double the amount from a decade prior.

Among Native Americans, the rate of opioid overdoses is disproportionately higher. In Michigan, opioid-related deaths are nearly twice as high among tribal members compared to other demographics.

Marijuana plant
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Michigan regulators have significantly expanded the list of conditions approved for treatment by medical marijuana. The Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs on Monday added 11 medical conditions deemed debilitating by the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act of 2008. They are: arthritis, autism, chronic pain, colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, obsessive compulsive disorder, Parkinson's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, spinal cord injury, Tourette's syndrome and ulcerative colitis.

Denied conditions include anxiety, asthma, brain injury, panic attacks, depression and diabetes.

MDARD

There’s been a big jump in the number of animals in Michigan testing positive for rabies.

This year, 22 bats and two skunks have tested positive for rabies. 

Micheal Hicks / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

It is the 157th birthday of someone whose life is proof that you shouldn't let the negative opinions of your professor get in the way of your ambitions.

William Mayo, half of the dynamic duo who went on to found the famed Mayo Clinic, was born this week in 1861.

Dr. Howard Markel, University of Michigan medical historian and PBS contributor, joined Stateside to tell us about his extraordinary life. 

narcan kit
zamboni-man / FLICKR - https://flic.kr/p/mjCzqS

The opioid epidemic reaches every corner of life in our state.

That includes libraries, where administrators and staff are figuring out the best response if a patron appears to be under the influence of drugs, or potentially experiencing an opioid overdose.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new report is calling for more to be done to improve drinking water quality at the nation’s child care centers.

The Environmental Defense Fund tested water samples from child day care facilities in four states, including Michigan. 

A mosquito
flickr user trebol-a / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Mosquito control briquettes have been applied to nearly 18,000 catch basins in a Detroit suburb. Warren says it's the first application of the mosquito repellants this year by public works employees. Another application is scheduled for August.

Mosquitoes can breed in catch basins, tire swings, buckets, and anything else that holds standing water.

Warren Mayor James Fouts says the control measures are aimed at protecting residents from West Nile virus and other illnesses that can be contracted from mosquitoes and ticks.

anxiety
Sharon Sinclair / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Feeling anxious or unsettled? You're not alone. An online poll from the American Psychiatric Association finds 39 percent of American adults reported themselves as more anxious today than they were in 2017.

a phoropter at an eye doctor's office
Plane J / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

There are more than 3 million Americans living with glaucoma. As Baby Boomers march into their senior years, that number is inevitably going to go up.

Now, researchers at the University of Michigan have come up with a medical implant that measures just 1 millimeter, and it's changing the way we treat glaucoma.

Gavel
Joe Gratz / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The opioid epidemic is causing death and havoc for families all across the United States.

Hundreds of state and local governments have filed lawsuits against the manufacturers of the prescription opioids. Among those suing are 50 cities in Michigan.

There is a big hurdle for those Michigan cities to clear, though. A 1995 state law, sponsored by then-state senator Bill Schuette, gave pharmaceutical companies protection from lawsuits filed by consumers.

Stateside 6.14.2018

Jun 14, 2018

Today on Stateside, how to talk to a friend or family member who you think may be considering suicide. Plus, Detroit reporter Charlie LeDuff talks race, politics, and more in his new book Sh*tshow.

To listen to individual interviews, click here or see below: 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new report finds Michigan’s suicide rate increased by a third over the last 20 years.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports between 1999 and 2016 Michigan’s suicide rate increased by 33 percent. That’s slightly higher than the 30 percent rate of increase nationally. 

The increase was even higher in more than 20 other states. North Dakota posted a nearly 60 percent increase in suicides during the past two decades. Only Nevada saw its suicide rate decline since 1999.

huntlh / pixabay

Four patient-care organizations have come out in opposition to a bill that would create work requirements for Medicaid recipients.

In a written statement, the Cancer Action Network, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, and Leukemia & Lymphoma Society said three-quarters of Medicaid recipients already work.

“For a variety of reasons a chronically ill person may not be able to meet that work requirement and then they may lose coverage of what, in many cases, is life saving coverage," said Sarah Poole with the American Heart Association. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The state health department is out with a new report on the deadly Legionnaires' disease outbreak in Genesee County.

The Michigan Department Health and Human Services makes an old claim linking most of the legionella cases to Flint’s McLaren hospital.

Stateside 5.23.2018

May 23, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear how Michigan pressed the feds to come up with PFAS standards at the EPA's national summit. And, we learn hackers are mining for Bitcoin, and they might be using your computer. Also today, we learn that a mother tried to tell the state her son was mentally ill and violent, but help came too late.

Team fEMR

We often ask listeners to reach out with stories we could share on Stateside. Here's an example of when someone did just that, writing to tell us about a Detroit-based nonprofit that can save lives.

It's called Team fEMR, a free and open source electronic medical records system for short-term medical service trips. It allows medical volunteers to record and pass along patient records to the next group of volunteers.

Area Agency on Aging of Northwestern Michigan Director, Heidi Gustine, cautions that the state is about to reach a tipping point, as more baby boomers reach retirement age.
BORYA - CREATIVE COMMONS / HTTP://MICHRAD.IO/1LXRDJM

How do you know if nursing homes and assisted living communities are treating you or your loved ones properly, and what do you do if they’re not?

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

There’s a new tool that Michigan cities can use to better understand their health care needs.

The NYU School of Medicine has developed what they call the City Health Dashboard, which looks at 36 key measures and drivers of health.   

Marc Gourevitch is the Dashboard’s principal architect. He says health problems like opioid abuse and obesity are tracked on the dashboard.

“Not only looking at health itself,” says Gourevitch, “but some of the things that cause health, like housing and transportation and air quality. So we try to bring all that together.”

Nick Savchenko / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

If certain health providers and legislators get their way, Michigan's mental health system could soon be privatized.

Pretty much everyone agrees that closer coordination of mental and physical health care would be a good thing for patients.

After all, the mind is connected to the body, but just how to get there has been up for fierce debate going on two years now.

St. Martin's Press, 2017

It began with unbearable pain — an alarming development for a woman seven months pregnant.

And before too long, Dr. Rana Awdish was losing her grip on life.

While Awdish did not die, she did endure a long, tough recovery from the medical crisis that cost her the life of her unborn child.

And, as a physician who cared for patients in the intensive care unit, she learned profound lessons about how doctors and nurses practice medicine.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Almost one in seven children living in Highland Park in 2016 had high levels of lead in their blood, according to a new report from the state's Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program.

The study looked at nine different cities with historically higher-than-average rates of children with elevated blood lead levels (EBLLs), including Highland Park, Detroit, Grand Rapids, Flint and Lansing.

Federal guidelines state that for children under six,  five micrograms per deciliter is considered a high blood lead level, though no amount is considered safe.

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