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impeachment

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The U.S. Senate impeachment trial could affect the re-election of at least one Michigan congresswoman.

But she says her focus is elsewhere.

President Donald Trump's legal team is asserting that he did "absolutely nothing wrong" and is calling the impeachment case "flimsy" and a "dangerous perversion of the Constitution." The brief from Trump's lawyers was filed before arguments expected this week in the Senate impeachment trial.

illustration of the US Capitol building
Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR

The Senate is holding a trial on the impeachment of President Trump, who is accused by the U.S. House of abusing his power and obstructing Congress.

Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s two U.S. Senators are preparing for Tuesday’s opening of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump.

illustration of the US Capitol building
Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR

Congress is taking additional steps to prepare for the upcoming Senate impeachment trial. The newly appointed House impeachment managers, who will present the case for impeachment, are reading the articles in the Senate chamber. Senators are also being sworn in as jurors.

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

The House of Representatives has delivered articles of impeachment against President Trump to the Senate, which is expected to begin a trial next week.

Earlier in the day, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi named seven Democratic members of Congress as the managers who will argue the case for impeachment.

Those managers brought the articles to the Senate on Wednesday evening.

illustration of the US Capitol building
Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR

The House of Representatives is taking the formal step of voting to transmit the articles of impeachment to the Senate, which will hold a trial. After the vote, the articles are physically brought to the Senate. Watch the proceedings live.

Dustin Dwyer / Michigan Radio

Defiant in the face of a historic rebuke, President Donald Trump rallied supporters in Michigan on Wednesday night as the House voted to impeach him, declaring, "It doesn't really feel like we're being impeached."

Trump took the stage just minutes before he became the third president in U.S. history to be impeached by the House of Representatives.

Updated at 9:27 p.m. ET

House lawmakers voted to impeach President Trump on Wednesday in only the third such rebuke in American history.

The move triggers a trial for Trump in the Senate, expected in January — one in which majority Republicans are likely to permit him to retain his office.

The vote was 230 to 197 on the first of two articles of impeachment — abuse of power — with one member voting present. The House then passed the second article — obstruction of Congress — with a vote of 229 to 198, with one member voting present.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Vice President Mike Pence fired up the president’s base at a small noon-hour rally in Saginaw, as the U.S. House of Representatives debated impeaching President Donald Trump.

Speaking to a group called Workers for Trump, the Vice President stressed the nation’s low unemployment rate and new trade deal with Canada and Mexico.

Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

On the eve of a historic vote in the U.S. House, people held rallies in many cities across the country, to call for the impeachment of President Donald Trump.  

In Ann Arbor, a large crowd of people gathered in front of the federal building, holding signs and chanting.  

Thomas Durussel-Weston said he believes the President abused the power of his office by attempting to get Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden, one of Trump's political rivals.   

illustration of the US Capitol building
Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR

The House of Representatives is meeting to debate and vote on articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan is going to be in the national spotlight Wednesday as President Donald Trump campaigns in Battle Creek, while at the same time the U.S. House of Representatives debates impeaching him.

The U.S. Capitol
user kulshrax / creative commons

Reps. Haley Stevens (D-MI 11)  and Debbie Dingell (D-MI 12) say they will vote in favor of both articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump.

That means all seven Michigan House Democrats, and Independent Rep. Justin Amash, will vote yes on impeachment. The state's six House Republicans plan to vote no.

Democratic U.S. Representative for Michigan's 5th congressional district Dan Kildee and former Republican State Representative Paul Hillegonds in the Stateside studio
Sarah Hulett / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside,  Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (D-Dearborn) explains how she’s approaching the historic impeachment vote in the House tomorrow. If the vote passes, Donald Trump will be the third president to be impeached in American history. Plus, with only two weeks left in the decade, we look back at how the last ten years have impacted our state.

Richard Phillips, longest-serving exoneree in United States history, and David Moran, an attorney from the University of Michigan's Innocence Clinic who worked on his case.
Sarah Leeson / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we spoke with Democratic Congresswoman Elissa Slotkin, who represents Michigan's 8th District, about why she is voting to impeach President Trump. Plus, Richard Phillips served some 46 years in a Michigan prison for a murder he didn't commit, making him the longest-serving exoneree in U.S. history. We spoke with him about what life has been like since he was released from prison more than two years ago. 

Rep. Elissa Slotkin
Katie Raymond / Michigan Radio

Update, Monday December 16 at 2:00 p.m.

U.S. Rep. Elissa Slotkin (D-MI 8) told a large crowd of constituents at Oakland University in Rochester that she will vote to impeach the President Donald Trump on the two articles of impeachment drawn up by the U.S. House: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

Joel Sanderson at an iron forge
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we talk to Paul Mitchell, who represents Michigan’s 10th District, about his view on the impeachment proceedings against President Trump. Plus, we talk to one of the longest-serving members of the Capitol press corps about his nearly five decades covering Michigan politics.

Updated at 12:12 p.m. ET

The House Judiciary Committee on Friday approved two articles of impeachment against President Trump, making him the fourth president in American history to face impeachment.

In contrast to Thursday's contentious back-and-forth between the two parties, Friday's session was devoid of rancor, or even any debate. Immediately after calling the session to order, Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., ordered two votes, one for each article. Both were approved 23-17 along party lines.

Updated at 8:50 p.m. ET

House Democrats unveiled two articles of impeachment against President Trump on Tuesday morning, charging him with abuse of power in the Ukraine affair and obstruction of Congress.

Read the articles of impeachment here.

Protesters holding signs on corner
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Vice President Mike Pence talked about the economy, national security and the impeachment inquiry at a campaign rally in Holland on Wednesday night. 

Outside of the campaign rally, there were more than 100 protesters calling for President Donald Trump's impeachment.

BERNT ROSTAD / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Today on Stateside, we recap the Michigan congressional delegation's reactions to the impeachment inquiry. Plus, following the recent settlement of a discrimination lawsuit against Founders Brewing Co., we talk to people of color in Michigan's food and craft beer scene about its lack of diversity.

The U.S. Capitol
user kulshrax / creative commons

The first public hearings in the impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump began last week. Since no Michigan representatives sit on the House Intelligence Committee, which held the hearings, we collected their statements on the inquiry.

As the Founding Fathers were drafting the U.S. Constitution, they were explicitly trying to avoid a repeat of the situation they had just fought a war to free themselves from — a ruler with unchecked power.

While they wrote a bare minimum about impeachment in the country's essential governing document, other writings from the time provide rich insights about their intentions.

Updated on Nov. 13 at 8:49 a.m. ET

Public impeachment hearings begin Wednesday, and the first round of witnesses includes three career public servants who have testified behind closed doors that President Trump did link military aid and a White House meeting for Ukraine with a promise to investigate one of the president's domestic political opponents.

Updated at 1 p.m. ET

The House of Representatives voted Thursday 232-196 to pass a resolution formalizing its impeachment inquiry into President Trump. Just two Democrats voted no — Reps. Collin Peterson of Minnesota and Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey.

Amid the debate, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., called it a "sad day."

illustration of the US Capitol building
Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR

The U.S. House of Representatives is voting to formalize its ongoing impeachment inquiry. The resolution before lawmakers outlines the next steps in their investigation. Watch the debate and vote on the House floor live.

Lauren Janes

Protesters called for the impeachment of President Donald Trump in Ann Arbor. People marched in the streets carrying signs which read “need to impeach” and “not above the law”.

The group Stop Trump Ann Arbor helped organize the event. Jessica Prozinski is with the group. She spoke to the crowd with a megaphone before they marched.

“We have to force the Democrats in the House to act and to act quickly. And then we also need to force the Senate to remove [Trump] from office,” Prozinski says.

Austin Thomason / Michigan Photography

Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton addressed a filled auditorium at the University of Michigan on Thursday. 

Although she spoke on a wide range of mostly foreign policy issues, she did respond to a question from the audience about impeachment, saying the actions of President Donald Trump merit an impeachment inquiry.

"The Ukraine phone call, the whistleblower report, the additional information now coming out certainly in my view meets the definition of an impeachable offense, if it's proven," Clinton said. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Republicans are stepping up their efforts to defeat two Democratic congresswomen who won formerly GOP-held seats in 2018.

Under brilliant sunshine Tuesday morning, dozens of sign-waving Michigan Republicans gathered outside Congresswoman Haley Stevens Livonia office to rally against the one term Democrat.    

Congresswoman Elissa Slotkin speaking in front of a fireplace
Tyler Scott / Michigan Radio

For U.S. Representative Elissa Slotkin, there’s one reason why she, reluctantly, supports an impeachment inquiry to investigate President Donald Trump.

“The issue that got to me was this idea that the President, the most powerful man in the world, reached out to a foreigner, a foreign leader, and asked him to dig up dirt on an American,” she says.

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