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indigenous people

Polling station sign
user jaina / Creative Commons

Today on Stateside, the role of election challengers at the polls. Also, a Mt. Pleasant photographer uses striking portraits to call attention to missing and murdered Indigenous women. And a conversation about the Arab American voting bloc in Michigan.

a picture of a brick building on Albion College's campus
Albion College

On Stateside, how can schools keep COVID-19 cases under control on campus, while also holding in-person classes? Albion College is hoping that their pandemic pod model might be the answer. Also, why the spectacular skies caused by Western wildfires are a reminder of the collective stakes of climate change. And finally, we hear from members of an artist collective that questions white people's fascination with—and sometimes fetishization of—Indigenous culture.

Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, were you planning on socially distanced tailgating this fall? Bad news: the Big Ten has reportedly voted against going forward with the college football season. We talked to sports reporter Chris Solari about what we know so far. Plus, we've got a conversation with an Escanaba teacher about the unique challenges rural schools face when it comes to online instruction this fall.

Sierra Clark stands in black shirt and denim skirt with background of trees and Meghanlata stands with a green shirt and black skirt with traditional embroidery in front of building
Indigenizing the News

Despite all the shifts in national consciousness over the past couple of weeks, we can still say that people of color are deeply underrepresented in traditional media and in newsrooms. That may be especially true for Indigenous communities. Less than 0.5% of journalists at the country's leading newspapers and online publications are Native American.

And while there are 12 federally recognized tribes within Michigan, local journalists have consistently failed to include Native people and issues in their coverage. A new project hopes to change these paradigms by hiring and training Indigenous journalists to report for Michigan newsrooms. 

Mike Russell / creative commons

When field workers began digging last spring at the future site of the bridge that will eventually replace the Ambassador Bridge between Detroit and Windsor, Canada, they expected to find a lot of indigenous artifacts.

It was 1823. The land of Michigan wasn’t yet a state. The indigenous people far outnumbered the white settlers. The Erie Canal hadn’t opened. The flood of European immigrants was yet to arrive.

Michigan Association of Environmental Professionals

Protecting the Great Lakes and Michigan's natural resources is a crucial task that's best accomplished by Michiganders working together.

That means all Michiganders, including the First Peoples. How can non-Indigenous people be good allies to Indigenous people?

Jim Roberts / National Register of Historic Places

Officials in Kalamazoo have agreed to recognize Indigenous Peoples Day instead of Columbus Day, but the city hasn't decided what to do with a statue that some say celebrates the forced removal of Native Americans.

A tribal member of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians.
Eva Petoskey

Detroit plans to recognize Indigenous Peoples Day starting next year instead of Columbus Day.

The Detroit News reports City Council approved a proposal Tuesday on the issue about how to mark the second Monday of October.

Detroit joins five other  Michigan cities that have adopted Indigenous Peoples Day, including Alpena, Ann Arbor, East Lansing, Traverse City and Ypsilanti.

Indigenous Peoples Day celebration in Berkeley, California.
Quinn Dombrowski / Flickr

Ann Arbor city council passed a resolution on Nov. 16 recognizing Indigenous Peoples Day in place of the nation-wide holiday, Columbus Day.

The Ann Arbor News reported Ann Arbor city council's decision this morning:

Michigan Historical Center

A $1 million grant is going to the Michigan History Foundation.

It's from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation and will help the Michigan Historical Museum revamp its 25-year-old exhibits.

But the grant is also meant to focus on racial equity. The money will be used for the museum's "Sharing Michigan's Untold Stories" project. Some of that will include stories of the indigenous tribes who where here before the Europeans came. 

Sandra Clark directs the Michigan Historical Center. She is working to incorporate diverse stories and voices into the museum.

Portrait of a Man, Said to be Christopher Columbus.
Metropolitan Museum of Art / Wikimedia Commons

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) - A Traverse City commissioner has pulled from Monday's agenda a resolution to rename Columbus Day as Indigenous Peoples Day.

The Traverse City Record-Eagle reports  Commissioner Jim Carruthers agreed to sponsor the resolution, but says it's not ready for a vote.

The resolution was requested by American Indian activist group Idle No More Michigan.

Carruthers says he wants to give Idle No More organizers more time to get a resolution of support from the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians.