Justin Amash | Michigan Radio
WUOMFM

Justin Amash

Justin Amash is running for the U.S. House of Representatives in Michigan's 3rd District as the Republican candidate.

(Scroll below to see all the Michigan Radio stories he's been mentioned in.)

As part of our election coverage, we asked all the major-party candidates running for Congress the same questions.

4 Questions for Justin Amash.

1. What is the most important issue facing your district?

Upholding the Constitution and the Rule of Law to defend liberty and preventing the government from undermining economic prosperity are the most important issues facing our district.

2. How do you plan to address it?

I have been a leader in defense of our Fifth Amendment-secured right to due process and Fourth Amendment-secured right against unreasonable searches and seizures. I will continue to pursue reforms like the Amash Amendment to prohibit the NSA and other government agencies from spying on all Americans in violation of the Constitution.

On the economic front, Congress must reduce taxes and unnecessary regulations that stifle innovation and increase unemployment. Low taxes across the board and a simplified regulatory system are the best ways to promote growth. We can reduce tax rates if we reduce spending. Congress must address the biggest drivers of the debt—large mandatory spending programs and military spending. I also support a well-structured balanced budget amendment, like my bipartisan H.J. Res. 54, the Business Cycle Balanced Budget Amendment.

3. What book or movie have you seen/read recently that you would recommend? Why?

I recently rewatched Jurassic Park, which may be the best film ever made on the futility of central planning and social engineering.

4. If you don't win the election, what will you do?

I approach every election with the expectation of winning.

Congressman Justin Amash
Facebook

West Michigan Congressman Justin Amash says he is no longer exploring running for president as a third party candidate.

He made the announcement on Twitter.

Amash says the ongoing pandemic and high levels of political polarization favor a two-party system, and doesn't leave a path for a candidate running as a Libertarian.

U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Flint.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, Democratic Congressman Dan Kildee talks about COVID-19 aid and his top priorities for future stimulus bills. Plus, how a recent presidential immigration order affects those seeking green cards. And, Michigan author Jeni McFarland shares her take on small-town life in her debut novel The House of Deep Water.

Congressman Justin Amash
Facebook

Michigan Congressman Justin Amash has decided to explore a run for a higher office: President of the United States.

On Twitter Tuesday night, Amash announced he’s formed an exploratory committee to run for the Libertarian Party’s presidential nomination.

Congressman Justin Amash
Facebook

West Michigan Congressman Justin Amash is considering a run for president. This week, Amash revealed that he has paused his Congressional reelection campaign while he considers running for the White House.

Libertarian columnist Shikha Dalmia joined Michigan Radio Morning Edition host Doug Tribou to talk about Amash's possible run and personal liberties in the time of stay-home orders. 

Justin Amash and Fred Upton
U.S. House of Representatives

Today on Stateside, we look at two traditionally Republican congressional districts in West Michigan that are going through political change. Plus, we talk to poet and prose writer Saladin Ahmed, who has made a stellar transition into comic books and written for several iconic Marvel characters. 

Nick Colvin
NICK COLVIN FOR MICHIGAN / HTTPS://WWW.COLVINFORMICHIGAN.COM/

Former Obama administration staff member Nick Colvin has decided to leave the race for Michigan’s 3rd Congressional District.

Colvin announced on his personal Facebook page this week that he’s leaving the race for personal and financial reasons.

Joel Langlois surrounded by supporters
Joel Langlois campaign

West Michigan businessman Joel Langlois ends his campaign to take Justin Amash’s congressional seat.

Langlois was in a crowded field of Republican candidates running for the seat currently held by the now Independent Amash.

Dustin Dwyer / Michigan Radio

Republicans debated last night in Grand Rapids for the chance to represent their party against Independent Congressman Justin Amash in 2020.

public domain / Wikimedia Commons

Candidates running to unseat Congressman Justin Amash will debate Monday night in Grand Rapids.

Amash left the Republican Party earlier this year, after calling for an impeachment investigation of President Donald Trump.

Amash is running for re-election as an independent, and several people are now running against him.

U.S. Congress / congress.gov

State Rep. Jim Lower (R-Greenville) announced Tuesday that he is no longer running to replace U.S. Rep. Justin Amash (MI-3).

The cover of Tim Alberta's new book "American Carnage: On the Front Lines of the Republican Civil War and the Rise of President Trump.”
Harper Collins Publishers

Over the past decade, American politics and culture have been sliding — slowly, but inevitably — in a new direction. This shift became obvious with the election of Donald Trump, but it began years ago.

That’s the central idea explored in a new book from POLITICO Magazine chief political correspondent Tim Alberta titled “American Carnage: On the Front Lines of the Republican Civil War and the Rise of President Trump.” He writes that the current tone in American politics began to take shape in earnest during the 2008 presidential campaign, when the Republican Party began to split along ideological lines.

Coding on a screen.
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, why West Michigan Congressman Justin Amash made the decision to leave the Republican Party, and what he thinks he'll accomplish as an independent. Plus, what the future of the manufacturing sector in Michigan will look like as technology continues to transform how we make things. 

Gage Skidmore / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

U.S. Rep. Justin Amash (Grand Rapids) declared his independence from the Republican Party on Independence Day, and since then has been using his platform to raise awareness on a current issue in the United States: the two-party system.

Joel Langlois surrounded by supporters
Joel Langlois campaign

West Michigan businessman Joel Langlois has announced he's challenging Congressman Justin Amash for Michigan's third congressional district. 

The Republican businessman joins an already crowded field of candidates challenging Amash, who recently made headlines for calling for impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. 

green neon sign that says smoke shop
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, how new rules from the state are likely to shape the marketplace for recreational marijuana in Michigan. Plus, a new bipartisan proposal in Lansing would overhaul the state’s current emergency manager law. 

Justin Amash official portrait
House.gov

West Michigan Congressman Justin Amash is the first and only Republican member of Congress to call for President Trump’s impeachment based on evidence presented in former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

On July 4, Amash published an editorial in the Washington Post announcing that he would be leaving the Republican Party. So, what does a newly-independent Amash mean for his district? 

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan says he is leaving the Republican Party because he has become disenchanted with partisan politics.

COURTESY OF 'WITH HONOR'

  

 

A scion of the Meijer family is running to unseat U.S. Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich.

Thirty-one-year-old Peter Meijer, grandson of the late retail industry titan Fred Meijer, is the latest Republican to line up to challenge maverick Congressman Justin Amash.

On Wednesday, Meijer released a 90-second online video, highlighting his service in the U.S. Army (he served in Iraq), and going after trash-talking politicians.

State Rep. Lynn Afendoulis standing at podium
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Michigan House Representative Lynn Afendoulis announced on Thursday that she’s running for Congress.

The Republican Afendoulis is running for Michigan’s 3rd Congressional District, which includes the city of Grand Rapids and Ionia, Barry and Calhoun counties.

Afendoulis says one of her biggest priorities is fixing the country’s immigration crisis.

protesters carrying signs
File photo / Michigan Radio

As President Trump ramps up his campaign, his deportation policy drew protests in Detroit this week. And a West Michigan congressman who called for impeachment proceedings against the president has faced a protest of his own.

Libertarian columnist Shikha Dalmia joined Michigan Radio Morning Edition host Doug Tribou to talk about those stories, and about Attorney General Dana Nessel's decision to dismiss all criminal charges from the Flint water crisis. 

Democrat Nick Colvin headshot
Colvin for Michigan / https://www.colvinformichigan.com/

United States Congressman Justin Amash faces another potential challenger for his seat. Democrat Nick Colvin says he will run for Michigan's 3rd Congressional District.

Colvin is a lawyer and worked in the Obama administration.

Trump supporters holding signs at a "Squash Amash" rally
Cheyna Roth / Michigan Radio

Dozens of President Donald Trump supporters gathered for what they called a “Squash Amash” rally Friday. Republican U.S. Rep. Justin Amash has been under fire from his own party. 

Justin Amash official portrait
House.gov

The lone Republican in Congress calling for President Donald Trump's impeachment has quit an influential caucus of House conservatives.

A spokeswoman for Michigan Rep. Justin Amash (R-Cascade Township) confirmed on Tuesday that he had resigned from the Freedom Caucus. Amash is one of the group's founders, but it is now controlled by Trump's allies.

Dustin Dwyer / Michigan Radio

U.S. Representative Justin Amash says he’s not worried about losing his seat, despite facing criticism from members of his own party for saying President Donald Trump engaged in “impeachable conduct.”

Amash (R-Cascade Township) spoke during a town hall event on Tuesday night in Grand Rapids.

He also called on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to begin impeachment proceedings against Trump.

"I think it would be appropriate for her to proceed with that," Amash said. 

Congressman Justin Amash
Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Congressman Justin Amash is holding a town hall meeting in Grand Rapids Tuesday night.

The town hall will be held at 5:30 pm at Grand Rapids Christian High School.  

The meeting will be the first time the Republican Congressman speaks directly to his constituents after he recently made headlines by being the first member of his party to accuse President Donald Trump of impeachable conduct.

John Seung-Hwan Shin / Wikimedia Commons Creative Commons license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en

  

U.S. Reps. Rashida Tlaib and Justin Amash raised questions this week in a hearing about the use of facial recognition technology by law enforcement agencies, including Detroit Police Department.

The hearing was held Wednesday by the U.S. House Committee on Oversight and Reform.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Congressman Justin Amash is facing a likely primary for his seat. State Representative Jim Lower (R-Greenville) says he will challenge Amash for the Republican spot on the 2020 ticket.

This comes after Amash said on Twitter over the weekend that Trump has engaged in "impeachable conduct."

Joel Freeman is chair of the Kent County Republican Party. He says Amash and Trump have been elected on the same ticket before, but he’s not sure if that’s possible again in the future.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Update: Sunday, May 19, 12:45 p.m.

President Donald Trump is calling Michigan congressman Justin Amash “a loser” for accusing him of “impeachable conduct."

In a series of tweets on Saturday, U.S. Rep. Justin Amash, says the Mueller report revealed that President Trump engaged in specific actions and a pattern of behavior that meet the threshold for impeachment.

Pages