Justin Amash | Michigan Radio
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Justin Amash

Justin Amash is running for the U.S. House of Representatives in Michigan's 3rd District as the Republican candidate.

(Scroll below to see all the Michigan Radio stories he's been mentioned in.)

As part of our election coverage, we asked all the major-party candidates running for Congress the same questions.

4 Questions for Justin Amash.

1. What is the most important issue facing your district?

Upholding the Constitution and the Rule of Law to defend liberty and preventing the government from undermining economic prosperity are the most important issues facing our district.

2. How do you plan to address it?

I have been a leader in defense of our Fifth Amendment-secured right to due process and Fourth Amendment-secured right against unreasonable searches and seizures. I will continue to pursue reforms like the Amash Amendment to prohibit the NSA and other government agencies from spying on all Americans in violation of the Constitution.

On the economic front, Congress must reduce taxes and unnecessary regulations that stifle innovation and increase unemployment. Low taxes across the board and a simplified regulatory system are the best ways to promote growth. We can reduce tax rates if we reduce spending. Congress must address the biggest drivers of the debt—large mandatory spending programs and military spending. I also support a well-structured balanced budget amendment, like my bipartisan H.J. Res. 54, the Business Cycle Balanced Budget Amendment.

3. What book or movie have you seen/read recently that you would recommend? Why?

I recently rewatched Jurassic Park, which may be the best film ever made on the futility of central planning and social engineering.

4. If you don't win the election, what will you do?

I approach every election with the expectation of winning.

The cover of Tim Alberta's new book "American Carnage: On the Front Lines of the Republican Civil War and the Rise of President Trump.”
Harper Collins Publishers

Over the past decade, American politics and culture have been sliding — slowly, but inevitably — in a new direction. This shift became obvious with the election of Donald Trump, but it began years ago.

That’s the central idea explored in a new book from POLITICO Magazine chief political correspondent Tim Alberta titled “American Carnage: On the Front Lines of the Republican Civil War and the Rise of President Trump.” He writes that the current tone in American politics began to take shape in earnest during the 2008 presidential campaign, when the Republican Party began to split along ideological lines.

Coding on a screen.
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, why West Michigan Congressman Justin Amash made the decision to leave the Republican Party, and what he thinks he'll accomplish as an independent. Plus, what the future of the manufacturing sector in Michigan will look like as technology continues to transform how we make things. 

Gage Skidmore / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

U.S. Rep. Justin Amash (Grand Rapids) declared his independence from the Republican Party on Independence Day, and since then has been using his platform to raise awareness on a current issue in the United States: the two-party system.

Joel Langlois surrounded by supporters
Joel Langlois campaign

West Michigan businessman Joel Langlois has announced he's challenging Congressman Justin Amash for Michigan's third congressional district. 

The Republican businessman joins an already crowded field of candidates challenging Amash, who recently made headlines for calling for impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. 

green neon sign that says smoke shop
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, how new rules from the state are likely to shape the marketplace for recreational marijuana in Michigan. Plus, a new bipartisan proposal in Lansing would overhaul the state’s current emergency manager law. 

Justin Amash official portrait
House.gov

West Michigan Congressman Justin Amash is the first and only Republican member of Congress to call for President Trump’s impeachment based on evidence presented in former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

On July 4, Amash published an editorial in the Washington Post announcing that he would be leaving the Republican Party. So, what does a newly-independent Amash mean for his district? 

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan says he is leaving the Republican Party because he has become disenchanted with partisan politics.

COURTESY OF 'WITH HONOR'

  

 

A scion of the Meijer family is running to unseat U.S. Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich.

Thirty-one-year-old Peter Meijer, grandson of the late retail industry titan Fred Meijer, is the latest Republican to line up to challenge maverick Congressman Justin Amash.

On Wednesday, Meijer released a 90-second online video, highlighting his service in the U.S. Army (he served in Iraq), and going after trash-talking politicians.

State Rep. Lynn Afendoulis standing at podium
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Michigan House Representative Lynn Afendoulis announced on Thursday that she’s running for Congress.

The Republican Afendoulis is running for Michigan’s 3rd Congressional District, which includes the city of Grand Rapids and Ionia, Barry and Calhoun counties.

Afendoulis says one of her biggest priorities is fixing the country’s immigration crisis.

protesters carrying signs
File photo / Michigan Radio

As President Trump ramps up his campaign, his deportation policy drew protests in Detroit this week. And a West Michigan congressman who called for impeachment proceedings against the president has faced a protest of his own.

Libertarian columnist Shikha Dalmia joined Michigan Radio Morning Edition host Doug Tribou to talk about those stories, and about Attorney General Dana Nessel's decision to dismiss all criminal charges from the Flint water crisis. 

Democrat Nick Colvin headshot
Colvin for Michigan / https://www.colvinformichigan.com/

United States Congressman Justin Amash faces another potential challenger for his seat. Democrat Nick Colvin says he will run for Michigan's 3rd Congressional District.

Colvin is a lawyer and worked in the Obama administration.

Trump supporters holding signs at a "Squash Amash" rally
Cheyna Roth / Michigan Radio

Dozens of President Donald Trump supporters gathered for what they called a “Squash Amash” rally Friday. Republican U.S. Rep. Justin Amash has been under fire from his own party. 

Copyright 2019 Michigan Radio. To see more, visit Michigan Radio.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Justin Amash official portrait
House.gov

The lone Republican in Congress calling for President Donald Trump's impeachment has quit an influential caucus of House conservatives.

A spokeswoman for Michigan Rep. Justin Amash (R-Cascade Township) confirmed on Tuesday that he had resigned from the Freedom Caucus. Amash is one of the group's founders, but it is now controlled by Trump's allies.

Dustin Dwyer / Michigan Radio

U.S. Representative Justin Amash says he’s not worried about losing his seat, despite facing criticism from members of his own party for saying President Donald Trump engaged in “impeachable conduct.”

Amash (R-Cascade Township) spoke during a town hall event on Tuesday night in Grand Rapids.

He also called on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to begin impeachment proceedings against Trump.

"I think it would be appropriate for her to proceed with that," Amash said. 

Congressman Justin Amash
Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Congressman Justin Amash is holding a town hall meeting in Grand Rapids Tuesday night.

The town hall will be held at 5:30 pm at Grand Rapids Christian High School.  

The meeting will be the first time the Republican Congressman speaks directly to his constituents after he recently made headlines by being the first member of his party to accuse President Donald Trump of impeachable conduct.

John Seung-Hwan Shin / Wikimedia Commons Creative Commons license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en

  

U.S. Reps. Rashida Tlaib and Justin Amash raised questions this week in a hearing about the use of facial recognition technology by law enforcement agencies, including Detroit Police Department.

The hearing was held Wednesday by the U.S. House Committee on Oversight and Reform.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Congressman Justin Amash is facing a likely primary for his seat. State Representative Jim Lower (R-Greenville) says he will challenge Amash for the Republican spot on the 2020 ticket.

This comes after Amash said on Twitter over the weekend that Trump has engaged in "impeachable conduct."

Joel Freeman is chair of the Kent County Republican Party. He says Amash and Trump have been elected on the same ticket before, but he’s not sure if that’s possible again in the future.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Update: Sunday, May 19, 12:45 p.m.

President Donald Trump is calling Michigan congressman Justin Amash “a loser” for accusing him of “impeachable conduct."

In a series of tweets on Saturday, U.S. Rep. Justin Amash, says the Mueller report revealed that President Trump engaged in specific actions and a pattern of behavior that meet the threshold for impeachment.

Reverend Fred Wooden
Unitarian Universalist Association Website / https://www.uua.org/offices/people/w-frederick-wooden

A minister and community activist in Grand Rapids wants to represent Michigan's third congressional district.

The preacher of the progressive Fountain Street Church in downtown Grand Rapids announced that he hopes to become the first Democratic candidate to represent the district in over 40 years.

Dustin Dwyer / Michigan Radio

Congressman Justin Amash faced more than two hours of harsh questioning from constituents at a town hall event in Grand Rapids last night.

It was Amash’s first town hall since his controversial vote in the U.S. House to support the Republican health care bill, known as the American Health Care Act or AHCA.

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

An ethics watchdog organization is asking the Office of Congressional Ethics to investigate a Twitter battle that broke out between Michigan Congressman Justin Amash and White House staffer Dan Scavino. This Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss the group's allegations that Amash violated House rules and Scavino violated the Hatch Act

They also discuss a study that shows an increasingly bleak future for Michigan roads and bridges, legislation that would allow doctors to prescribe life-ending medication to terminally ill patients, and a report that says roughly $40 million was spent on the state's 14 congressional races in 2016. 

Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

An ethics watchdog organization wants the Office of Congressional Ethics to investigate whether Congressman Justin Amash violated House rules during a twitter fight with a White House staffer. The group filed ethics related complaints against both Amash and White House Director of Social Media Dan Scavino.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The tweet came at 12:33 p.m. last Saturday.

Capitol Hill
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Last week, House Republicans submitted their bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

The bill, which has been under intense committee debate, has drawn criticism from Democrats, some Republicans, health care organizations, doctors, and others. But it is largely supported by House Republicans and the White House.

Some of the bill’s provisions would be enacted as soon as it is put into law, including the elimination of individual and employer mandates. Others would be delayed until 2020, such as limiting the Medicaid expansion and a repeal of subsidies for out-of-pocket expenses.

Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Some Michigan members of Congress have been criticized lately for avoiding constituents. But two Republican congressmen from West Michigan are hosting in-person events over the next few days.

U.S. Rep. Bill Huizenga, R-2nd Dist., has his first in-person town hall of the year set for this Saturday at noon in Baldwin. The tiny town about an hour north of Grand Rapids was supposed to be a part of Huizenga’s annual snowmobile tour. There’s not enough snow this year, but he didn’t cancel the event.

Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

More than 600 people showed up to a town hall meeting hosted by Congressman Justin Amash Thursday night. It was his second Grand Rapids town hall in less than a month and it was the second time so many people showed up they had to close the doors and turn people away.

Some Michigan members of Congress have been criticized lately for avoiding constituents.

But town halls are not new for Amash. The Republican says he’s always felt taking unscripted questions from his constituents, in person, is part of the job. But under the new administration, the crowds have been major.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan businesses are taking part in a new push to resurrect a federal agency that helped American companies do business overseas.

The Export Import Bank of the United States was created under President Franklin Roosevelt. It has been the official export credit agency of the U.S. government. Its purpose is to provide financing and insuring foreign purchases of U.S. goods for customers unable or unwilling to accept the credit risk. 

Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Starting today, the Export-Import Bank can't offer new loans to foreign customers.

The bank helps American companies sell their goods overseas when regular banks won’t take on the risk. Congress did not reauthorize the 80-year-old bank before leaving for the Fourth of July recess, allowing it to expire.

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