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Tyler Scott / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, considering post-pandemic redevelopment for Michigan’s cities. Also, musician Izzy Johnson plays music for walking the forests, tending the fields, or just being. And, the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Artifacts plans expansion in West Michigan. 

Lansing mall cinemas in front of a blue sky
Wikimedia Commons

When the pandemic brought his career to a screeching halt, indie filmmaker and comic Amaru was scouring the state for a good place to hatch his next plan.

That plan—to launch Greenwood District Studios (GDS), Michigan’s first Black-owned independent film studio—came to Amaru when he got back home to Lansing. He was grabbing a meal with his girlfriend when an old, colorful building grabbed his attention: the Lansing Mall Cinema, vacant since 2014.

“I was like, ‘check, please,’” Amaru recalled.

The next day, he signed a lease, moved into the building, and began hatching his grand scheme.

City of East Lansing

Today on Stateside, what Republicans in the state Senate found in their investigation of potential widespread fraud in the 2020 election.  Then, redevelopment efforts in East Lansing. And, navigating the ups and down of elder care in Michigan.

michigan state capitol building in lansing, mi
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

What possible connections did Michigan have to the January 6 U.S. Capitol insurrection? That's a question Democratic state lawmakers are hoping to answer. Democratic leadership filed a resolution on Tuesday calling for the creation of a bipartisan joint committee to investigate potential ties in the state to the events of January 6.

A screen capture of the Michigan Attorney General's presentation.
Michigan Attorney General

Four Muskegon County deputies and one former Wellspath nurse have been charged with involuntary manslaughter Thursday over the death of a man in jail. 

 

 

In March 2019, 39-year-old Paul Bulthouse was held at Muskegon County Jail on a probation detainer. He was classified as suicidal, which required him to be monitored every fifteen minutes. This also meant his cell was close to the booking center and was always visible on video monitors. 

Bulthouse died 13 days later after suffering 22 seizures in five and a half hours, according to a release from Michigan’s Attorney General Dana Nessel.

The Capital Dome in Lansing, Michigan.
Joe Dearman / Flickr

Today, on Stateside, federal money is still trapped in a deadlock over Michigan’s budget. Plus, there’s an unconventional ring to wedding bells this past year. Stateside talked to two folks planning nuptials in an ever-changing pandemic.

Lansing Mayor Andy Schor highlighted his efforts at addressing diversity and accountability during Wednesday’s State of the City Address.

Schor touted his efforts in working with Lansing’s police chief to reform policies for traffic stops and putting an end to “no knock” searches. He also pledged to continue addressing racial disparities through his Racial Justice and Equity Alliance.

Lester Graham
Michigan Radio

Plans for a mass demonstration Sunday at the state Capitol drew a large law enforcement presence, but only a small crowd of protesters.

State capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, old tensions between Governor Whitmer and state legislative leaders flared during the lame-duck session. Plus, a conversation with the author of the satirical novel The Great American Cheese War about its eerie parallels with some of 2020’s biggest stories. And, we talk more about the vaccines and how distribution is going in Michigan. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Some people in Flint are turning to a higher power to deal with a rise in violent crime.

“We pray right now for protection, Lord. We pray for strength, Lord,” Pastor Chris Martin used a megaphone, as he led a small march from his church, past a city park where the city’s latest murder victim was found Saturday.

Unsplash

Today on Stateside, COVID-19 cases continue to rise and hospitals throughout Michigan are nearing capacity. A reporter who’s been following the story talks us through when a vaccine might be distributed to Michigan's frontline health workers. Also, the head of the state’s largest school district speaks to the challenges of 2020 and beyond. Plus, support for kids and families navigating grief this holiday season.

michigan state capitol building in lansing, mi
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Lansing has always been a busy place. It’s home to the state Legislature, which makes it a popular location for protests from across the political spectrum. And just down the road, in East Lansing, is the state’s largest public university, home to tens of thousands of Michigan State University students. But amid the ongoing pandemic, the large groups of people that tend to gather in the capital region have made containing COVID-19 particularly complicated.

Sparrow Hospital entrance in Lansing
Allen Neighborhood Center / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Update, Monday November 16: After a weekend that was "incrementally better" than expected in terms of COVID-19 patient admissions, Sparrow leadership now believe the Lansing hospital will reach full capacity around Thanksgiving, rather than this week. As of Monday, Sparrow was at 81% capacity with 136 COVID patients, according to the state's census. 

"You never know what will happen day to day," says Sparrow spokesperson John Foren. "The latest I saw was conceivably Thanksgiving week. It'll be day to day." 

gretchen whitmer sitting at table
michigan.gov

State and federal authorities have charged a group of 13 suspected terrorists in an alleged plot to kidnap Governor Gretchen Whitmer and recruit militia members to storm the state Capitol.

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel and the FBI announced the charges Thursday. They say the men wanted to overthrow the state government and incite a civil war.

people with signs standing outside state Capitol
Kevin Lavery / WKAR

The group Stand Up Michigan rallied Thursday at the state Capitol in Lansing. The event came a few hours after news broke of the foiled alleged kidnapping plot against Governor Gretchen Whitmer.

outside of SCOTUS building
user dbking / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, we discussed how two recent Supreme Court decisions may impact cases in Michigan. Plus, last night, Lansing City Council heard public comments on a proposal to cut police funding in the city by 50 percent over the next several years.

(Subscribe to Stateside on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or with this RSS link)

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Monday, the Lansing city council may take a step toward considering slashing the city’s police department budget by 50%.

Councilman Brandon Betz says his proposal is about “re-envisioning public safety”.

a police car focused on the illuminated light bar
pixabay

The Lansing Police Department says it will no longer stop drivers for traffic violations that don’t pose a threat to public safety. 

The new policy means Lansing police won’t pull drivers over for so-called secondary violations.  Those include things like cracked windshields, loud exhaust and broken tail lights.  Lansing Police Chief Daryl Green says it’s an effort to protect the constitutional rights of citizens and eliminate bias-based policing. 

michigan state capitol building in lansing, mi
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Hundreds of people marched from the Lansing Center to the state Capitol on Wednesday as part of a march against police brutality.

The words "Black Lives Matter" echoed across the Capitol lawn at the NAACP’s “We are Done Dying” march.

Nathanael Jefferson has been to several protests in Detroit and Lansing. He says he has personally been profiled in Lansing and sees police profiling all the time.

Protesters have staged nightly protests in Lansing against police brutality and the killing of George Floyd. Now, those protests have turned into calls to defund the Lansing Police and for Mayor Andy Schor to resign.
Abigail Censky / WKAR

More than one hundred protesters gathered on the state capitol steps Sunday marking a week of protests in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd, a black Minneapolis man, by a white police officer.

Discussion during a Black Lives Matter Lansing webinar Wednesday night was dominated by criticism over the city’s police budget and a call for Lansing Mayor Andy Schor’s resignation.


protesters in front of state capitol
Abigail Censky / WKAR

This post was last updated Sunday, May 31st at 11:10 p.m.

Hundreds gathered at the Michigan State Capitol Sunday to protest the police killing of George Floyd, a Black man in Minneapolis who was killed after White Police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for minutes.

absentee ballot
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, local and county clerks are raising concerns about their ability to deal with an influx of absentee ballots in November’s presidential election. Plus, the woman who turned the University of Michigan into a softball powerhouse talks about the yawning gender equity gap in college sports coaching. 

Kate Wells/Michigan Radio

About 100 gun rights supporters rallied on the steps of the state Capitol building in solidarity with Virginia, as a lineup of speakers warned the heavily-armed crowd that the gun control measures proposed in that state could happen in Michigan, too.

“They could literally be at our doorstep tomorrow here in Michigan with those same bills,” said DeeDee Dubose, one of the event’s organizers from Jackson. “That’s why we’re here to stand with Virginia, and our people saying, 'No, no, no, that’s not right.’”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Lansing’s Catholic bishop has responded to an internal review into complaints the diocese’s schools were racially insensitive.

The diocese was criticized after several African-American Lansing Catholic High School football players were benched after kneeling during the national anthem in 2017.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Preparations are expected to begin this week for a quarter billion dollar mixed-use development on the border of Lansing and East Lansing.

Lansing Mayor Andy Schor says workers will be begin clearing the 36 acre site of the $270 million Red Cedar Development Project. A ground breaking is expected next month.

Jasmine Tamimi

 

Local student organizer, Khadega Mohammed, has been working on raising awareness about the current turbulence in Sudan by helping organize rallies across the state and sharing information through awareness campaigns on social media.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Detroit and Lansing are among ten U.S. cities picked to be part of an effort to improve economic mobility.

Foundations linked to billionaires Michael Bloomberg, Bill Gates, and Steve Ballmer are behind the effort to improve the future of America’s children.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Lansing held a ceremony this week to celebrate an end to veteran homelessness in the Capitol City.

The Lansing, East Lansing and Ingham County Continuum of Care, the Capitol Region Housing Collaborative (CRHC), was recently recognized by the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH), Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) as “effectively ending” homelessness among veterans.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The mayor of Lansing wants to power all city buildings with 100% renewable energy starting with the city's new fiscal year.

Mayor Andy Schor is including the switch to primarily wind and solar power in the budget he’s introducing this week.

“We will be the first city in the state of Michigan, as far as we can tell, that will be 100% renewable energy,” says Schor. “And I think that’s really important; we have to lead by example.”

A Lansing Board of Water & Light official says roughly 99% of the power would come from solar and wind sources. 

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