WUOMFM

legacy costs

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Lansing’s mayor is not ruling out some “pain” as the city deals with a rising legacy costs.

Lansing Mayor Andy Schor sat down with his Financial Health Team for the first time today to discuss ways of dealing with the capitol city’s long-term liabilities.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Lansing has a new mayor.

Andy Schor took his oath of office at noon today.

He’s the capitol city’s first new mayor in a dozen years.

Schor struck an optimistic tone in his inaugural address at the Lansing Center before hundreds of supporters and dignitaries.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Monday, the city of Lansing will swear in its first new mayor in a dozen years. 

Former State Rep. Andy Schor will take his oath of office during a midday ceremony at the Lansing Center. 

Schor won November's general election with nearly three-fourths of the votes cast.

The soft-spoken Schor replaces the at-times combative Virg Bernero, who has sat in the mayor's office since 2006. 

Among the challenges the new mayor faces is tackling Lansing's looming legacy costs. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - A push to curtail health care benefits for municipal retirees in Michigan is setting off a fight between those who say billions in debt can no longer be ignored and critics who contend it would cheat people out of coverage.

  The new Republican-sponsored plan could be enacted yet this year. It aims to address $11 billion in unfunded liabilities.

  Starting in May, newly hired municipal workers would no longer qualify for health insurance in retirement. Local governments could instead contribute to a tax-deferred account such as a health savings plan.