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mental health

A picture of the Kalamazoo Psychiatric Hospital
MDHHS / MDHHS

A state audit of the Kalamazoo Psychiatric Hospital shows long-standing problems that could be affecting patient care.

The hospital failed to remove employees accused of patient abuse or neglect from patient contact in at least three investigations, according to the audit released this week by the Michigan Auditor General.

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Today on Stateside, we talk to an elder care researcher about the mental and physical health challenges seniors face during the pandemic. Also, Flint poet laureate Semaj Brown reads an essay she wrote on why she believes her alma mater, Cass Technical High School should be renamed.

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Today on Stateside, developments in the cases surrounding the death of 16-year-old Cornelius Fredericks at a youth facility in Kalamazoo. Also, how systemic racism impacts the mental health of Black Americans. Plus, Michigan is challenging how the U.S Department of Education is allocating coronavirus relief money.

Black woman in therapy sits with her head in her hands as her therapist takes notes on a clipboard
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Black Americans reported a significant spike in symptoms of anxiety and depression following the release of the video that showed a Minneapolis police officer kneeling on George Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes. 

“It’s important to understand that the killing of unarmed Black men—and Black people, period—it’s had a collective toll on our psyche,” said Napoleon Harrington, a therapist at Ambassador Counseling and Resource Group.

Algeria Wilson headshot with a quote next to her that reads "It’s time for white people — especially white social workers, who tend to be women — to listen and act to help end racism. "
Courtesy of Algeria Wilson

The  COVID-19 pandemic is sweeping through communities of color like a thief in the night, stealing parents, grandparents, children, siblings and leaving behind grief, trauma, economic and educational instability. Every day, we have to worry about our health and safety, not only from a deadly virus, but from white people all around us. We wonder if we are safe in our homes, on a jog, at the park, or even while delivering a baby.

Doctor or nurse sitting down with hands clasped
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Today on Stateside, healthcare workers emerging from months of fighting the COVID-19 pandemic find themselves in need of mental health support. Two reporters discuss what they’ve heard from the medical frontlines. Also, a check-in on the status of Michigan’s summer camps. Plus, a conversation with a lawyer helping arrested protestors, and an essay about protesting by the poet laureate of Grand Rapids.

Courtesy of Maureen Biddinger-Grisius

The nurse’s husband woke her up the night she started screaming in her sleep.

“I was crying.” she said. “I cannot remember what the dream was about, but it was so real.”

scrabble tiles that spell out mental health
Pixabay

A community mental health provider in Michigan says the stress of the COVID-19 pandemic could result in a behavioral health crisis.

Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services, a psychiatric hospital and behavioral mental health provider in Grand Rapids, published a report that studied past pandemics including the 2003 Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome – or SARS – outbreak in Asia.

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Today on Stateside, families advocate for their loved ones isolated in hospitals amidst the COVID-19 crisis. Beaumont Health representative Kelly Parent weighs in on the communication options available between hospital staff and families unable to be present at their loved ones’ bedsides. Plus, how to maintain your mental health while you’re at home.

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Pretty much everything about the COVID-19 pandemic has been stressful.

Dr. Arash Javanbakht, director of the Stress, Trauma, and Anxiety Research at Wayne State University, says situations COVID-19 has forced on us create major stress triggers. Stay-at-home orders and social distancing have caused abrupt changes, leaving us feeling a lack of control. Javanbakht and Alison Miller, associate professor of public health at the University of Michigan, gave some advice on how to cope with stress and some tips to get a handle on the situation.

scrabble tiles that spell out mental health
Pixabay

Michigan’s mental health community is facing some unique challenges during the COVID-19 crisis, and is making changes. Mental health care providers say isolation can be difficult for everyone, but especially for people with depression and other mental health issues.

Some mental health providers are providing telehealth – helping people over the phone and online.

Illustration of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services says three patients in state psychiatric facilities have tested positive for COVID-19.

Two of the positive cases are patients at the Walter Reuther Psychiatric Hospital in Westland and one is at the Center for Forensic Psychiatry in Saline.

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Today on Stateside, a new campaign wants to add protections for LGBTQ people to the state's existing civil rights law. Plus, a conversation with a Detroit-born author and Instagram influencer who wants to challenge stereotypes about fat, black, and Muslim women. 

Children in a classroom
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

Public school students in Detroit will soon have access to new mental health care services.

The Detroit Public Schools Community District is teaming up with a University of Michigan program called TRAILS, or Transforming Research into Action to Improve the Lives of Students.

An artist's rendering of the planned Beaumont/UHS mental health hospital.
Beaumont Health

The ground-breaking ceremony for Beaumont Health's new mental health hospital took place Monday. The hospital will be located on eight acres of vacant land across from Beaumont Hospital in Dearborn.

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The birth of a new baby is an exciting time. Family and friends come over to fawn over the new baby. They bring gifts and take turns holding the new addition. But what happens when a mother doesn't feel that same joy—when she feels disconnected from all the excitement around her?

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U.S. Library of Congress

Today on Stateside, an old industrial site contaminated with uranium since the World War II has partially collapsed into the Detroit River. Plus, a group of West Michigan musicians have brought old Michigan folk songs once sung by sailors and lumberjacks back to life.

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Today on Stateside, a rundown of the major issues voters across the state will see on their ballot in Tuesday's election. Plus, an urgent care center designed for mental health needs.

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Today on Stateside, what does the resignation of a member of the Michigan State University Board of Trustees mean for the university moving forward? Plus, how Kalamazoo and other cities are preparing for, and trying to mitigate, the impacts of climate change.

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Today on Stateside, how signs of progress on a U.S. trade deal with China could impact Michigan manufacturers. Plus, one family is hoping to fill the gaps in mental health care services for young adults after losing their son to suicide.

A photo of Garrett Halpert in Washington D.C.
Photo courtesy of Julie Halpert

When it comes to supporting and treating young people who struggle with mental illness, the safety net in Michigan has a lot of holes. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among people ages 15 to 34, but finding appropriate medical care is often a difficult process. It can take months to get an appointment with a psychiatrist or therapist, even when a young person is in crisis. 

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“Here’s the question that even I have difficulty with: are you having thoughts of suicide?” Frank King told a crowded room in Lansing on Tuesday. An estimated 500 students, school counselors, and other educators came in from across the state for a Student Mental Health Summit, where the focus ranged from social media to the impact of putting therapists in schools. 

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Licensed Professional Counselors, their colleagues and advocates rallied Monday night in Detroit for a State House bill they hope will let them continue doing their jobs in Michigan.

The bill would codify in law that LPCs can diagnose and treat people with mental health conditions. A proposed state administrative rule change would tighten up rules that state officials say have allowed LPCs to do that outside of their scope of practice for more than 30 years.

Woman sitting on couch talking to counselor
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Hundreds of mental health counselors filled a hearing room in Lansing Friday. Hundreds more rallied outside to oppose a change in state rules that govern their profession. The state Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs is deciding whether to adopt the new rules.

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Today on Stateside, top United Auto Workers union leaders are now working with federal investigators on the probe into corruption at the UAW. Plus, we talk to the Detroiter who is just one country away from having visited every United Nations recognized country. She is aiming to be the first black woman to do so. 

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Mental health patients might have to wait longer to get their conditions diagnosed – if they can get care at all. That’s according to mental health counselors, who say a rule change by the state is about to put thousands of them out of business.

 


Mental health treatment has changed drastically in the past century. But it wasn’t that long ago that many people with severe mental illnesses were permanent residents at state-run psychiatric hospitals.

There were once 16 psychiatric hospitals across Michigan, including Traverse City State Hospital. An oral history project in Traverse City is shedding light on what life was like in those institutions.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

State health department officials say the state of Michigan should keep a psychiatric center in the Thumb open, but scrap plans for a major expansion.

The Caro Center has been operating for more than a century in Tuscola County. Hundreds of people are employed at the center which provides psychiatric care to dozens of patients in a collection of aging buildings.

Inside the doctor's office.
Jennifer Morrow / Flickr

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services announced it would end its contract with Lakeshore Regional Entity, a local group that's one of the state’s Prepaid Inpatient Health Plans (PIHPs) and coordinates mental and behavioral health care for low-income people and people with disabilities in West Michigan.

Leland's Fishtown in the rain
Fishtown Preservation Society

Today on Stateside, rising water levels in the Great Lakes could threaten historic buildings in Leland’s Fishtown. Plus, there’s been another setback in a years-long effort to improve mental health care in Michigan. 

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