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mental health

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

State health department officials say the state of Michigan should keep a psychiatric center in the Thumb open, but scrap plans for a major expansion.

The Caro Center has been operating for more than a century in Tuscola County. Hundreds of people are employed at the center which provides psychiatric care to dozens of patients in a collection of aging buildings.

Inside the doctor's office.
Jennifer Morrow / Flickr

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services announced it would end its contract with Lakeshore Regional Entity, a local group that's one of the state’s Prepaid Inpatient Health Plans (PIHPs) and coordinates mental and behavioral health care for low-income people and people with disabilities in West Michigan.

Leland's Fishtown in the rain
Fishtown Preservation Society

Today on Stateside, rising water levels in the Great Lakes could threaten historic buildings in Leland’s Fishtown. Plus, there’s been another setback in a years-long effort to improve mental health care in Michigan. 

New recruits for MDOC at swearing in ceremony raising their hand
Michigan Department of Corrections / Flickr

Working as a corrections officer can be a high stress job. Earlier this year, we spoke with Cary Johnson, a corrections officer in Jackson, about the mental health challenges facing the state’s prison workforce.

Johnson has lost four colleagues to suicide within two years, and she told us both cultural and structural changes were needed to create a healthier work environment for the state’s corrections officers.

Now, the Michigan Department of Corrections is creating an employee wellness program to help correctional officers deal with the high stress environment of working in a prison.

self-driving car
MCity UMich

Today on Stateside, around 1,000 Iraqi nationals are in danger of deportation starting Tuesday after a federal appeals court decision ruled that Immigration and Customs Enforcement could move forward with trying to send them back to Iraq. Plus, we talk to a corrections officer a Jackson prison that has lost four officers to suicide in the past two years about how to better support prison staff who are grappling with mental health issues.

Cary Johnson in front of fence
Courtesy of Cary Johnson

A note of warning: there is some brief graphic language in the interview. Listener discretion is advised.

  

In the past two years, the Cotton Correctional Facility in Jackson has lost four correctional officers to suicide. Earlier this month, his family and co-workers honored Michael Perdue, a long-time CO at Cotton, who died by suicide this year.

Corrections officers across the state are hoping these tragic losses will bring attention to the pressures of working in prisons.

CREEM Magazine founder Barry Kramer, editor Dave Marsh, and editor Lester Bangs sitting on a stoop near the CREEM offices on Cass Avenue in Detroit.
Charlie Auringer

Today on Stateside, a report from a state commission says that the state's trial court funding system is "broken." Plus, we talk to the producers of a documentary about CREEM, a Detroit-based rock n' roll magazine that rivaled Rolling Stone during the 1970s and 1980s. 

Looking down on a hand holding an open bottle of prescription drugs.
Sharyn Morrow / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Washtenaw County Community Mental Health is about to expand its mental health and substance abuse services. 

Starting May 1, a WCCMH team will offer ongoing treatment services to any county resident who is unable to  find a community provider in a timely manner. That's regardless of their insurance type or ability to pay for services.

"This will be a team that can respond to a crisis," said Trish Cortes, executive director of WCCMH. "And not only just respond to the crisis, but also help stabilize individuals until we can get them an appropriate provider."

LGBT Pride Flag
Tyrone Warner / flickr

Today on Stateside, what will a lawsuit settlement that prohibits state-funded adoption agencies from refusing LGBTQ clients mean for Michigan moving forward? Plus, from full-length movies to one-minute shorts, we talk about the films you'll find at the 57th annual Ann Arbor Film Festival, which kicks off Tuesday.

this is a picture of director of photography, Sam Davis
Courtesy of Sam Davis

Today on Stateside, we talk with Congresswoman Debbie Dingell about the loss of her husband and his  last words to America. Plus, we continue our look into Michigan's mental health services for children, with a conversation about the state's dire shortage of child and adolescent psychiatrists. 

Credit Melinda Odisho

A danger to themselves or others. That’s the threshold set by Michigan law to put someone in a psychiatric hospital.

But many families with autistic children say meeting that definition doesn’t seem to be enough for their kids--and they don’t know what to do.

This is one family’s story.


People looking at their phones.
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, Michigan's new cyberbullying law goes into effect next month, but will it actually make kids safer from online harassment? Plus, a recent study from the University of Michigan finds that tens of thousands of Michigan kids and teens aren't getting the mental health treatment they need. 

young man sitting with his head in his hands in the middle of a field
Francisco Gonzalez / Francisco Gonzalez

Tens of thousands of children in Michigan aren't getting the mental health treatment that they need, according to a recent report published in JAMA Pediatrics. 

University of Michigan researchers tracked the prevalence of three of the most common and treatable mental health disorders — depression, anxiety, and ADHD — among young people at both the national and state level. They also looked at how many of those kids and teens were getting treatment. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

There’s a bill in the Michigan legislature which could lead to teachers getting special mental health training.

State Sen. Sylvia Santana’s bill directs the Departments of Education & Health and Human Services to develop a professional development course for teachers on “mental health first aid.”

Elissa Slotkin
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Today on Stateside, U.S. Representative Elissa Slotkin (D-Holly) tells us what she thinks it will take to end the longest partial federal government shutdown in United States history, now in its fifth week.  Plus, we hear about some up-and-coming artists in the Detroit's music scene, and say goodbye to a legendary guitarist from the city. 

Dawn Bennett Dailey at the Kalamazoo Institute of Art
Long Haul Productions

Creating Connection Michigan is a series of intimate, first-person stories about the power of art to change lives. This week, we hear from a Kalamazoo woman whose art-making helped her cope with tragic losses.

Scrabble pieces spelling out "ADHD"
Unsplash

The stereotypical picture of someone with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) tends to be a young hyperactive boy, who just can’t sit still in class. But that picture doesn't tell the whole story.

There is increasing evidence that girls with the disorder are underdiagnosed. And while the symptoms might change over time, ADHD doesn’t just disappear when you reach adulthood. So what does that mean for adult women with the disorder?

Michigan State University sign
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Last week, Michigan State University announced that it will not reopen the fund it had previously set up to pay for counseling and other services sought by survivors of  Larry Nassar’s sexual abuse. MSU officials froze the $10 million fund in July, citing concerns over fraud.

Ann Arbor superintendent Jeanice Swift
April Van Buren / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, the Michigan legislature has been busy pushing through bills during lame duck. The question is: will Governor Rick Snyder sign them? Plus, how training police to interact with people who have a mental illness or cognitive disability can reduce the chance of a violent encounter. 

Kalamazoo police car
Kalamazoo Department of Public Safety / Facebook

 

Perhaps you’ve heard news stories about police arriving on the scene and mistaking someone with autism or a mental illness as a violent threat. Sometimes that story ends very badly.

That's why some police departments have started training officers to identify a mental health crisis and deal with the situation without using violent force. It's called the "Crisis Intervention Team" model. 

Colleen Edmonds
Bella Isaacs / Michigan Radio

 

Being a freshman in college is exciting: meeting new people, learning new things, and figuring out who you are. But these big changes can also trigger or worsen mental health disorders like anxiety and depression.

If untreated, those disorders can be fatal. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students.

And all too often, parents have no idea that the student is struggling. 

An artist's rendering of the planned Beaumont/UHS mental health hospital.
Beaumont Health

Beaumont Health will build a new, $40 million mental health hospital in Dearborn as part of a plan to expand its mental health services.

The 150-bed facility is the centerpiece of that expansion. Set to open in 2021, Beaumont says it will double its capacity for inpatient psychiatric services and serve as a coordinating hub for mental health care across the health system.

person on scale
unsplash

 


Food is supposed to nourish us, both body and spirit.

But what happens when someone's relationship to food  - and to their own body - spirals out of control? 

An eating disorder not only interferes with someone's quality of life. It can also be fatal if it's not treated. 

Paula Reeves
Joe Linstroth / Michigan Radio

Last week, a 17-year old student opened fire at Santa Fe High School. He left 10 dead and 10 more injured.

With every mass shooting in the United States comes a cry to address the issue of mental health. Lawmakers say we need to identify these troubled kids — and get them mental health resources before something terrible happens.

anxiety
Sharon Sinclair / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Feeling anxious or unsettled? You're not alone. An online poll from the American Psychiatric Association finds 39 percent of American adults reported themselves as more anxious today than they were in 2017.

Hand holding
User: Mrs. Logic/flickr

 


The world is still reeling from the recent deaths of designer Kate Spade and chef and writer Anthony Bourdain. These tragedies have drawn the country's attention as rates of suicide continue to climb.

 

grand hotel on mackinac island
David Ball / creative commons

 

Michigan’s decision-makers are gathered this week on Mackinac Island for the annual Detroit Policy Conference. 

State House Speaker Tom Leonard is among those attending. He spoke with Stateside about a number of upcoming ballot measures being discussed in the state legislature. Once a voter-driven initiative is certified to be on the ballot, the legislature has 40 days to do one of three things: They can amend and pass it, offer a competing proposal, or do nothing and let it go to the ballot. 

Emergency room hospital
Pixabay.com / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

There are few moments more stressful than witnessing your child in the grips of a mental health crisis.

In Kent County, parents who are in the middle of that situation can turn to the Children's Crisis Response Team operated by network180, the community mental health authority in Kent County.

Andrew Boekestein manages the team made up of mental health clinicians. He spoke with Stateside about the need for more services for kids experiencing a mental health crisis. 

Nick Savchenko / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

If certain health providers and legislators get their way, Michigan's mental health system could soon be privatized.

Pretty much everyone agrees that closer coordination of mental and physical health care would be a good thing for patients.

After all, the mind is connected to the body, but just how to get there has been up for fierce debate going on two years now.

Cynthia Canty / Michigan Radio

When do you know the time has come to seek mental health care? Then, where do you go? To whom do you turn?

It's a critical question in the quest for mental health and wellness, and we don't tend to think about it until there's a crisis.

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