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michigan education

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Michigan is not on track to be a top ten state in K-12 education by 2030, according to a report from the Education Trust-Midwest found.

The annual report Opportunity For All says that Michigan is currently 35th in the nation in fourth grade reading and 33rd in eighth grade math.

Person studying math with a notebook and a calculator.
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As one of 11 states that does not require homeschooling parents and their children to have any contact with state or local education officials, Michigan’s approach to homeschool oversight is one of the most relaxed in the nation.

On yesterday's show, we talked about concerns that lax regulation allows some parents to conceal abuse and neglect at home. 

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A bill introduced by Representative Tim Kelly (R-Saginaw) passed yesterday with some amendments in the state House. If the education bill is passed in the state Senate, it will create an A-through-F grading system for Michigan schools.

Rep. Kelly joined us to discuss SB 5526 and respond to criticizers of the bill, such as Nikolai Vitti, the superintendent of Detroit Public Schools Community District who called the bill anti-democratic. 

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In the past decade, American education has gone through some major changes. Parents are sometimes shocked by how different schools look from when they were there, and that can lead to friction between parents and teachers.

 

Stateside’s education commentator Matinga Ragatz joins us to discuss how to bridge the gap in understanding between parents and teachers.

4 tables of boys at Christmas party at Coldwater State Home & Training School (ca. 1925)
University of Michigan’s Bentley Historical Library

Today on Stateside, a conversation with the reporter who broke the story of two Detroit funeral homes that were shut down for their mishandling of human remains. Plus, our education commentator shares her thoughts on how Michigan schools could update their classrooms to better serve modern students. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.  

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Today on Stateside, the executive director of the Michigan Association of School Superintendents and Administrators talks about how Michigan school districts are responding after a company that provides substitute teachers to more than 100 Michigan districts abruptly closed its offices. Plus, we hear from the Republican and Democratic candidates for Michigan’s next Secretary of State.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

A long table surrounded by red chairs in a school classroom.
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The Michigan Department of Education on Wednesday released the results of its latest M-STEP assessment exams.

The big takeaways? Only 44-percent of students in grades 3-8 passed the literacy part of the exam. That's down from 2015, the first year the M-STEP was given.

School desks
Flickr user Frank Juarez/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan is not doing a good job educating children with disabilities. That’s according to a recent letter from the U.S. Department of Education.

Michigan was the only state rated as needing federal intervention after failing to meet special education standards.

A few weeks before that letter became public, Detroit Public Schools Community District announced it would be doing a massive overhaul of its special education program.

School desks
Flickr user Frank Juarez/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

Michigan is the only state failing to meet enough special education requirements to need intervention, according to a recent evaluation by federal education officials.

The Department of Education breaks its annual evaluation on special education down into three categories: meets, needs assistance, needs intervention, and lastly “needs substantial intervention.” The state of Michigan spent the past four school years in the “needs assistance” category.

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After a storm of criticism, state education officials are extending the public comment period on proposed changes to the state social studies curriculum.

The public now has until the end of September to share its opinion of the proposed changes to what the state will require be taught in Michigan schools. It’s the first major change to social studies standards since 2007.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Some of Michigan’s most influential business and education leaders say they plan to work together to improve the state’s education system.

The coalition officially unveiled Launch Michigan in Lansing today.

Doug Rothwell, the president and CEO of Business Leaders of Michigan, calls this a “transformational moment.”

Multi-colored books.
Kimberly Farmer / Unsplash

The Education Trust-Midwest continues its quest to prod our state's leaders to do what is needed to improve our schools.

The nonpartisan research and advocacy organization is out with a new plan containing five specific ideas to reverse the decline in Michigan education and put the state on track to become a top-ten performer in education.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new poll shows most Michigan parents have doubts about the education their children are getting.

Ed Sarpolus, with Target Insyght, says pollsters asked the opinions of 1,000 parents of children in traditional and charter public schools, private schools and home schools. 

He says only 12% say current teaching practices in Michigan are meeting the needs of their children.

“They’re not confident that the methods being taught now do help their children succeed. Not only in class but also in life,” says Sarpolus.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio/NPR

Later this month, a new report detailing how much it costs to educate students in Michigan will be released.

Nearly a year ago, the governor’s 21st Century Education Commission reported Michigan needs to “invest with urgency” in some “high-yield” education strategies or risk falling behind.