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Michigan music

Courtesy of Eddie Gillis and Third Man Pressing

When Frank Solis found the tapes, he almost threw them out.

He and his family — as well as the music world — had assumed that his father, Michigander and Tejano music pioneer Martin Huron Solis Jr., had never recorded the songs that made him a pioneer in Detroit’s music scene of the 1940s and ‘50s. Though Martin was inducted into the Tejano R.O.O.T.S. Hall of Fame in 2018, he was best known for his compelling live performances and hadn’t ever released an album with his fellow musicians, who made up Los Primos.

Judge's gavel with books on a desk
Pixabay.com

Today on Stateside, the Mayor of Flint talks about the charges filed against former state officials for the city’s water crisis. Plus, we review new work by Michigan poets, including a nominee for the National Book Award. We end show with story of a collaboration between 3rd Man Records and the family of a Tejano music star from Detroit.

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Today on Stateside, a look at the year in music. We review the latest records from Michigan musicians—released despite all the live event cancellations brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic—with music aficionado John Sinkevics, the editor and publisher of Local Spins. Plus, we revisit recent releases from Flint musician Tunde Olaniran and Albion-turned-Nashville duo The War and Treaty.

blonde woman, jennifer granholm
jennifergranholm.com

Today on Stateside, news broke Tuesday that President-Elect Joe Biden plans to nominate former two-term Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm as the next U.S. Secretary of Energy. We speak with Granholm’s former communications director about what the former governor would bring to the role if confirmed. Also, songs of isolation from a Detroit-based singer-songwriter. Plus, longtime Southeast Michigan news anchor Devin Scillian talks to us about his secret life as a bestselling children’s book author.

Rep. Haley Stevens smiling in front of an American flag
U.S. House of Representatives

Today on Stateside, recently re-elected Democratic Representative Haley Stevens (MI-11) explains what’s next in the process of getting COVID-19 vaccines to Michiganders and talks about the presidential transition process. Plus, a conversation about the lasting influence of jazz legend Yusef Lateef. 

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Today on Stateside, Michigan’s Republican legislative leaders headed to the White House to talk to President Trump about his desire to reverse the will of Michigan voters. Also, the founders of Michigan’s first black-owned brewery talk about carving out their place in the craft beer scene and starting a business during a pandemic.

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Today on Stateside, COVID-19 cases continue to rise throughout the state. We check in with an Upper Peninsula health department about the outbreak’s impact in the area. Also, U.S. Representative Rashida Tlaib (D-13th) on Election Day results and the needs of her district. Plus, new music from a Flint singer-songwriter and musician.

Erebus Haunted House outside of building
Courtesy of Ed Terebus

Today on Stateside, an artist and an architect come together to rethink what performance spaces look like in the era of physical distancing. Also, with Halloween right around the corner we’ll explore the changed aspects of the haunted house business.

Yusef Lateef plays a flute
Charles Andersen / Wikimedia Commons - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, an alleged plot from an anti-government extremist group to kidnap Governor Whitmer and take hostages at the state Capitol has been foiled by federal investigators. We'll talk about what we know about this case so far and how it ties into a broader discussion about the rise of violent alt-right movements in America. Plus, we talk about the life and legacy of the late Detroit native and jazz legend Yusef Lateef ahead of his 100th birthday. 

A nurse administers a vaccine.
Rhoda Baer / Flickr - http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Today on Stateside, we check-in with Crain’s Detroit Business about the latest in vaccine development for COVID-19. Plus, we talk to a hip-hop artist from Detroit whose career was just picking up steam when the pandemic came crashing down on the music industry. And we ask parents and kids how they're handling the new school year.

virtual orchestra playing
Grand Rapids Symphony

Today on Stateside, a violinist from the Grand Rapids Symphony talks about rehearsing without an ensemble, and other oddities of 2020. Plus, we talk about the shift in Michigan’s car culture.

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Today on Stateside, Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson discusses the state's preparedness for a deluge of absentee ballots ahead of the November election, and how the new redistricting commission is shaping up. And a Michigan MC hangs up the mic to spend time on herself and her family.

a photo of May Erlewine and the Woody Goss Band in front of a brick building
Courtesy of May Erlewine

Free, luscious, uplifting, joyful. These probably aren’t words many of us would use to describe how we feel right now, in the dog days of a uniquely stressful and solitary summer.

But that’s how Michigan singer-songwriter May Erlewine hopes you feel listening to her new album Anyway. The record is a collaboration with Woody Goss of Vulfpeck, and it’s scheduled for release Friday, August 14.

Band members standing on stage
Mark Samano

Many clubs and bars opened last weekend since stay-at-home orders have gone into effect, and musicians are eager to return to work and play for an audience. One of the venues to open last weekend for the first time was The Blind Pig in Ann Arbor.

The Blind Pig reduced its occupancy to 100 people, giving concert-goers more room in the small space. Masks are also required for entry.

On stage at the club last weekend was Sabbatical Bob, a local funk band.

The U.S. Supreme Court building
U.S. Supreme Court

Today on Stateside, we talk to a Detroit artist whose new mural is a monument to Malice Green and the wider community of Black citizens killed at the hands of police. Plus, two young Dreamers discuss what the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program (DACA) means for them.

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Today on Stateside, more Michigan businesses reopen, including some bars and restaurants. A bartender weighs in on some service industry workers’ concerns. Also, two Black American journalists discuss covering protests against police brutality, during a pandemic, in a field dominated by white reporters and editors. Plus, an artist collective based up north relaunches.

Stevie wonder at the piano
Pete Souza / The White House

Happy birthday to you, Stevie Wonder! The Michigan soul legend was born 70 years ago Tuesday in Saginaw, and has been filling our lives with wonder ever since.

Stevie Wonder’s career began at an incredibly young age. He was just 11-years-old when he signed to Motown Records. WDET host Ann Delisi joined Stateside to talk about Wonder’s prodigious career and life.

a ventilator with tubes coming out of it
Adobe Stock Images

Today on Stateside, the Big Three auto companies have wound down production at their plants over worries about the spread of the novel coronavirus. Plus, how Michigan musicians are dealing with canceled concerts and connecting with their fans in the age of social distancing. 

Erin Zindle and the Ragbirds performing at a Live from the Birds Nest concert
Courtesy of Erin Zindle

  

The ban on public gatherings due to the coronavirus outbreak has hit a lot of sectors hard. One group grappling with how to make a living now is musicians, who rely on live concerts for most of their income. With bars and venues shuttered, some artists are now getting creative about reaching their fans from an appropriate social distance.

work being done under Mackinac bridge
Enbridge

Today on Stateside, we talk to the head of Enbridge's tunnel project about what's happening with Line 5. Plus, a conversation with the Detroit-based metal band I Prevail, which is nominated for two Grammy Awards this year.

Joel Sanderson at an iron forge
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we talk to Paul Mitchell, who represents Michigan’s 10th District, about his view on the impeachment proceedings against President Trump. Plus, we talk to one of the longest-serving members of the Capitol press corps about his nearly five decades covering Michigan politics.

Group of men sitting on a hill
U.S. Library of Congress

Today on Stateside, an old industrial site contaminated with uranium since the World War II has partially collapsed into the Detroit River. Plus, a group of West Michigan musicians have brought old Michigan folk songs once sung by sailors and lumberjacks back to life.

Vinyl on a record player.
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Looking for new music to ease the transition from summer into fall. Local Spins editor and publisher John Sinkevics has you covered. He joined Stateside with an update on three West Michigan artists that he recommends checking out.

five musicians standing
Michigan-I-O

 

Eighty-one summers ago, folklorist Alan Lomax visited Michigan as part of a 10-year project collecting American folk music for The Library of Congress. The recordings feature the songs of lumberjacks, iron miners, and Great Lakes sailors, among others.

After three months, Lomax left the state in his 1935 Plymouth, which was filled to the brim with a collection of 250 instantaneous discs and eight reels of film documenting life in Michigan. 

Children on a swing set in Detroit's ella fitzgerald park
City of Detroit

 

 

Today on Stateside, the city of Detroit is making efforts to revitalize local neighborhoods by creating new public gathering spaces. Plus, a contemporary strings band is using new techniques to electrify all genres of music.

 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 

 

Today on Stateside, a Republican proposal to fix Michigan’s roads is circulating in Lansing that wouldn't raise taxes. Plus a look at avian botulism, a disease that’s killing waterfowl across the Great Lakes.

Etienne Charles in a red hat playing the trumpet
Courtesy of Etienne Charles

Carnival is a vibrant, musically-rich celebration that happens before the start of Lent. It’s celebrated across the globe, bringing out the most unique aspects of many cultures and traditions.

Jazz trumpeter Etienne Charles, who teaches at Michigan State University, celebrates the festival in a new album titled Carnival: The Sound of a People. Charles says this album gave him the opportunity to explore the history of Carnival in his native Trinidad.

Michigan Radio

 

 

Today on Stateside, Michigan bean farmers send a lot of exports to Mexico. So, what happens to those farmers if President Trump follows through on his threats to add tariffs to Mexican goods? Plus, we hear about a tricked out bicycle with accordion and percussion instruments that blends classical music and public art. 

Robert Jones and Matt Wotruba
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

The Reverend Robert Jones and Matt Watroba first met while hosting back-to-back music shows at a public radio station in Detroit.  

That chance encounter bloomed into a friendship rooted in a mutual love for acoustic roots music that's still going strong more than 30 years later.

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