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Michigan Republican Party

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Republican state lawmakers are working to push a package of 39 election-related bills through the Michigan Legislature. The bills would change state election laws in many ways, including preventing the Secretary of State’s office from mailing out absentee voter applications and requiring photo identification to vote. The bills’ authors say changes are needed in order to ensure elections are fair. But many elections experts and clerks say state elections are already fair, and the bills would make it harder for Michiganders to cast their votes.

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The state Bureau of Elections is continuing its probe into whether money paid by the Michigan Republican Party to former Secretary of State candidate Stan Grot violated campaign finance laws.  

Jack Rollow, spokesman for Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson, confirmed Thursday that the investigation would continue despite the Michigan Republican Party earlier this week withdrawing a letter sent last week to the Bureau by then-party chair Laura Cox.

Cox's February 4 letter triggered the investigation.

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Today on Stateside, the Michigan Republican Party meets this weekend to select a new chair. Two reporters discuss the candidates, as well as the latest power play that’s complicated the upcoming election. Also, why the small community of Hillsdale has a wealth of COVID-19 vaccines available for distribution. Plus, a curator discusses the Black Arts Library, which she’s brought to the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit.

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The Michigan Republican Party convention is Saturday. The top job in the party just became a public brawl. 

The current chair of the state Republican Party is Laura Cox. She was not planning to run for re-election. But then, as first reported by the Detroit News, she made allegations of financial impropriety against the man expected to be the next chair of the state party, Ron Weiser, a Regent of University of Michigan.

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Former ambassador, Ron Weiser, has emerged as the presumptive next chair of the Michigan Republican Party.

That’s after current chair Laura Cox decided not to seek another term.

Weiser is a wealthy businessman who has served in the role twice before – from 2009 to 2011 and from 2017 to 2019.

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Today on Stateside, the election results are mostly settled, but that hasn’t stopped Republican leaders from following Trump’s lead with unfounded arguments about voter fraud. We talk with the executive director of Voters Not Politicians who’s been keeping tabs on the situation. Plus, we take a look at the role Native American voters played in this election. And, we discuss the future of the GOP.

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Michigan House Republicans

While Gov. Gretchen Whitmer has indicated that her administration is working on guidelines for a partial restart of the state’s economy as soon as May 1, Michigan’s Republican leaders have presented their own set of suggestions for what reopening sectors of the state’s economy could look like.

Michigan House speaker Lee Chatfield, a Republican representing District 107, weighed in on the Republican leadership’s proposal and how it would approach reopening the economy on a county-by-county basis.

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Republicans are stepping up their efforts to defeat two Democratic congresswomen who won formerly GOP-held seats in 2018.

Under brilliant sunshine Tuesday morning, dozens of sign-waving Michigan Republicans gathered outside Congresswoman Haley Stevens Livonia office to rally against the one term Democrat.    

The Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island.
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, the UAW strike against General Motors is stretching into week two. What does that mean for the Michigan economy? Plus, craft beer is big business in Michigan, but some small craft brewers say current state law is preventing them from expanding. 

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Republicans in Michigan filed another lawsuit to stop the redistricting commission. The Michigan Republican Party says the state’s new redistricting commission is unconstitutional.

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Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan says he is leaving the Republican Party because he has become disenchanted with partisan politics.

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Justin Amash is the Congressman from Michigan's 3rd district. When President Gerald Ford was a member of the U.S. House, he represented Michigan's 5th district. District boundaries evolve over time, but both claimed Grand Rapids as their population center, so it's fair to say Amash is a Ford successor.

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Fresh off statewide defeats in 2018, Michigan’s Republican Party picked new leadership Saturday.

“Are you ready to win in 2020!” National Republican Party Chair Ronna Romney-McDaniel said as she rallied the state GOP convention in Lansing.

The party needs rallying after losing races for governor, attorney general, and secretary of state in 2018. Republicans held onto control of the state Senate and House but by slimmer margins.

AcrylicArtist / MorgueFile

 


The Michigan Legislature will return from summer break next week, and Republicans are discussing the potential of adopting two proposals headed to the ballot this November. 

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Courtesy of Monica Sparks

There's a unique story playing out in West Michigan politics. Twin sisters are both running for seats on the Kent County Board of Commissioners for opposing parties.

Since they live in different districts, they could end up serving on the board together, but on opposite sides of the aisle.

Jessica Ann Tyson is a Republican. Her twin sister, Monica Sparks, is a Democrat.

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Michigan’s Democratic and Republican parties held nominating conventions over the weekend. 

Despite a few political snags, each party now has their full slate of candidates ready for the November midterm elections.

Tonya Schuitmaker
Senate PhotoWire

 

On August 25th, Republicans will meet for the 2018 state convention to nominate candidates. 

Among those vying for the nomination for Michigan Attorney General are Representative Tom Leonard, currently Speaker of the House, and state Senator Tonya Schuitmaker.

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Thursday night’s Republican governor’s debate saw Attorney General Bill Schuette touting his ties to President Trump, Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley focusing on his record with Gov. Snyder, State Senator Patrick Colbeck playing up his conservative credentials, and Dr. Jim Hines playing the role of non-politician outsider in the race.

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Vice President Mike Pence will be in Michigan Friday. 

He’s helping to raise money for one of the Republicans running for governor.

Pence is the key note speaker at a noon hour fundraiser for Attorney General Bill Schuette’s gubernatorial campaign at the Townsend Hotel in Birmingham.

The four Republican governor candidates on the stage together for the debate
Screenshot from WOOD-TV's stream of the debate / WOOD-TV

The four Republicans running for governor held their first debate this week. It was the first time Attorney General Bill Schuette, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, Sen. Patrick Colbeck and Dr. Jim Hines have appeared together on one stage.

There were arguments over the handling of the Flint water crisis and who's the biggest Trump supporter. One thing they all agreed on is that Michigan should not legalize recreational marijuana, but they said they'd respect the wishes of the voters. This Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry talk about what else stood out in the debate.

The four Republican governor candidates on the stage together for the debate
Screenshot from WOOD-TV's stream of the debate / WOOD-TV

 


 

The four Republicans who want to be your next Governor held a debate last night in Grand Rapids on WOOD TV.

 

It was the first time Attorney General Bill SchuetteLieutenant Governor Brian CalleyState Senator Patrick Colbeck, and Saginaw obstetrician Dr. Jim Hines were all together on one stage. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

President Trump’s Saturday night speech in northern Macomb County became the latest skirmish in Michigan’s Republican race for governor.

During his speech, President Trump made it clear who he supports in Michigan’s governor’s race.

“We’re honored to be joined by a great friend of mine and a great Attorney general, the next governor of Michigan, Bill Schuette,” Trump told the cheering crowd packed into the Total Sports Park indoor soccer field.

President Trump
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

President Trump spent Saturday night rallying his supporters in Michigan.

The president told his Macomb County audience he had another invitation for Saturday night.

“You may have heard I was invited to another event tonight. The White House Correspondents Dinner,” Trump told the crowd, which began booing. “But I’d much rather be in Washington, Michigan than Washington, D.C. right now.”

The president talked about a wide range of topics, from de-nuclearization on the Korean Peninsula to Michigan’s auto industry.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

This year, TV ad spending is spiking early among candidates running for Michigan governor.

The Michigan Campaign Finance Network reports $1.7 million has been spent on TV ads to promote candidates in Michigan’s governor’s race. 

The network’s Craig Mauger says most of that spending was by Democrat Shri Thanedar, who’s poured $1.2 million into TV campaign ads since the January 1.

MSU Board of Trustees

EAST LANSING, Mich.- Brian Breslin will not seek re-election this year as a Michigan State University trustee.

Sarah Anderson, spokeswoman for the Michigan Republican Party, says Breslin has informed party officials. Voters choose candidates who are nominated by political parties.

  Breslin is chairman of the MSU Board of Trustees. He has expressed support for President Lou Anna Simon during the controversy over Larry Nassar, who sexually assaulted girls while he was an MSU sports doctor.

A photo of Bob Young from his campaign's facebook page
Bob Young Jr. / Facebook

The 2018 U.S. Senate race got a shake-up Wednesday, but not because someone was entering the race. Instead, the shake-up came from Republican Bob Young's decision to step down as a candidate. 

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whitehouse.gov

Vice President Mike Pence will try to rally support in Michigan tomorrow for the new Republican tax reform plan. He’ll speak Thursday afternoon at American Axle Manufacturing in Auburn Hills.

The plan unveiled this week almost doubles the standard deduction for married taxpayers filing jointly to $24,000. Individual filers will see their standard deduction increase to $12,000.

RNC national chairwoman Ronna McDaniel and Michigan Republican Party Chair Ron Weiser addressed the media for opening remarks, but the roundtable discussion was not made available to reporters.
Tyler Scott / Michigan Radio

Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel hosted a roundtable discussion with African-American community leaders in Detroit on Monday.

McDaniel opened with a swift condemnation of white supremacy after the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia Saturday.

“As chairman of the Republican party, I want to be perfectly clear,” McDaniel said. “That white supremacy, Neo-Nazi, KKK, and hate speech and bigotry is not welcome, and does not have a home in the Republican Party.”

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State Republicans and Democrats are sparring over a proposal to keep some key Affordable Care Act provisions in place in Michigan, even if Congress succeeds in repealing Obamacare.

President Trump's first speech before a joint session of Congress delivered themes and promises that are very familiar.
Screen grab from YouTube.com

President Trump's first speech before a joint session of Congress delivered themes and promises that are very familiar. It was delivered in a tone many have remarked was more presidential and more aspirational.

Rep. Paul Michell (R) and Rep. Dan Kildee (D) joined Stateside to give a perspective of last night's speech from both sides of the aisle.

From the Republican side, Congressman Paul Mitchell, who represents Michigan's 10th District, said the speech "captured the aspirations of Americans."

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