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michigan supreme court

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David Trumpie of Trumpie Photography

Michigan voters will elect two justices to the state Supreme Court in November. Bridget Mary McCormack is one of the seven candidates.

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Vote Nepton

Michigan voters will elect two justices to the state Supreme Court in November. Katherine Mary Nepton is one of the seven candidates.

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Mary Kelly for Justice

Michigan voters will elect two justices to the state Supreme Court in November. Mary Kelly is one of the seven candidates. 

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Susan Hubbard for Justice

Michigan voters will elect two justices to the state Supreme Court in November. Susan Hubbard is one of the seven candidates. 

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Courtesy of Kerry Lee Morgan

Michigan voters will elect two justices to the state Supreme Court in November. Kerry Lee Morgan is one of the seven candidates.

Michigan voters will elect two justices to the state Supreme Court in November. Elizabeth Welch is one of the seven candidates.

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Brock Swartzle for Justice

Michigan voters will elect two justices to the state Supreme Court in November. Brock Swartzle is one of the seven candidates. 

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer at a press conference holding a "vote" sign
State of Michigan

A Michigan Supreme Court opinion has created confusion surrounding the state’s COVID-19 response. But Governor Gretchen Whitmer says she still has options to require people to abide by mask and social distancing advice. Health experts say that remains the most effective way to slow the spread of COVID-19.

The opinion raises lots of questions, and no shortage of assumptions, on the status of the governor’s emergency orders. Those orders affect stores and shops, schools, as well as indoor and outdoor gatherings.

MDHHS

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services is imposing new mask requirements, gathering limitations and restaurant capacity rules tied to COVID-19.

Last Friday, the Michigan Supreme Court issued an opinion that could restrict Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s authority to issue executive orders in response to the pandemic.

On Monday, state health department director Robert Gordon stepped into the void with an order of his own. Gordon says he is using authority unconnected to the court’s ruling to keep much of the governor’s coronavirus restrictions in place.

“Orders have helped to stem the spread of COVID. They have reduced the number of cases. They have saved lives,” Gordon told reporters on a conference call on Monday. “We need shared action through orders as much today as we did in March and April.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The Michigan Supreme Court has issued an opinion on months of orders by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer that were aimed at preventing the spread of the coronavirus.

The court says Whitmer illegally drew authority from a 1945 law that doesn't apply. The court determined that the law was an "unlawful delegation of legislative power to the executive branch in violation of the Michigan Constitution."

Judge's gavel with books on a desk
Pixabay.com

The Michigan Supreme Court has appointed a special master to help decide whether a Wayne County judge committed judicial misconduct.

Two female prosecutors have accused Third Circuit Court Judge Bruce Morrow of making sexually suggestive and explicit comments during a 2019 homicide trial—from derogatorily comparing one prosecutor’s questioning of a medical examiner to sexual intercourse, to asking another about her height and weight (see the accusations here, and Morrow’s response to them here).

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

This week, the Michigan Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments in a legal challenge to Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s use of emergency powers during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Whitmer has faced numerous legal challenges to their use of emergency powers during the coronavirus outbreak. Just last month, the Michigan Court of Appeals sided with the governor in a lawsuit filed by Republican lawmakers.  

James Colby Hook III, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Today on Stateside, a new ruling from the Michigan Supreme Court will have major implications on how counties collect money on tax foreclosed homes. As back to school season comes into view, how are teachers feeling about returning to work in uncertain times. Plus, how Sundown Towns across Michigan defined systemic racism in housing and neighborhoods.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Michigan Supreme Court has dealt a blow to county treasurers with a new ruling, finding that counties can’t keep any profits they get from selling tax-foreclosed homes at auction.

The ruling stems from a lawsuit, Rafaeli v. Oakland County, that challenged one part of Michigan’s tax foreclosure law. The current law, which dates back to 1999, allows county treasurers—who collect delinquent property taxes on behalf of local communities—to pocket the whole sale price of auctioned properties, regardless of the amount of delinquent tax debt.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Michigan Supreme Court has overturned orders that directed an Owosso barber to close his shop during the coronavirus pandemic.

Lester Graham

The Committee to Ban Fracking in Michigan has delivered its petition signatures to the Secretary of State’s office. The group hopes its initiative is on the ballot in November. 

“Our initiative will ban horizontal fracking and the waste that comes from horizontal fracked wells as well as change the state’s policy about climate change and maximizing oil and gas production,” said LuAnne Kozma, the campaign director of the committee.

michigan supreme court
Michigan Courts

Attorneys won’t be in the Michigan Supreme Court chambers this week as they argue cases. Instead, the state’s highest court will hear oral arguments online due to the COVID-19 crisis.

This is the first time the state’s highest court will use the internet to hear appeals and question attorneys. All sides have to agree for cases to be argued online, and litigants will still have to file written briefs with the court.

courts.michigan.gov

The Michigan Supreme Court is telling state courts to consider drastic steps to curb the spread of coronavirus. And some of those courts, along with some federal courts, have done so already.

One of those recommended steps: suspending most civil and criminal jury trials until the threat from the pandemic ebbs.

Cheryl Casey / Adobe Stock

A case before the Michigan Supreme Court asks this question: How much can the government take from you if you don’t pay your property taxes?

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William Hook / Unsplash

The Michigan Supreme Court has adopted a significant rule change that will allow the public to bring cell phones, laptops and tablets into all state courthouses and courtrooms.

The new rule will also let members of the public use their phones to photograph state court records.

The new rule will take effect on May 1, 2020. Currently, rules for personal electronic devices vary a lot among local courts.

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William Hook / Unsplash

The Michigan Supreme Court is considering a change that would allow cell phones in court houses. They’re taking public comment this week.

Right now, local judges are allowed to decide whether or not cell phones can be brought into a court.

Judge's gavel with books on a desk
Pixabay.com

Some residents of northern Michigan could be eligible to have their criminal records expunged. The Michigan Supreme Court and University of Detroit Mercy’s law school will be holding a series of clinics that will help guide people through that process.

Flickr user Joe Gratz / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The Michigan Supreme Court says prosecutors in criminal cases cannot rely on experts to testify on how often children typically lie or tell the truth about sex abuse. The court says juries were swayed by opinions, not the facts, in two individual cases.

Michigan Supreme Court
Subterranean / Wikimedia Commons

The Michigan Supreme Court says the state’s tribal governments do not fall under a constitutional provision that can prevent some people from running for office.

Fred Paquin was on the board of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians' governing body. He pleaded guilty to conspiracy to defraud the United States in 2010.

Michigan Supreme Court
Subterranean / Wikimedia Commons

The Michigan Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Macomb County retirees’ benefits can be altered.

A class-action lawsuit against the county involved 16,000 unionized Macomb County retirees. The majority opinion says Macomb County's collective-bargaining agreements did not give the plaintiffs the right to unalterable and lifetime retirement health care benefits.

Michigan Supreme Court
ehrlif / Adobe Stock

Michigan Supreme Court justices could get pay raises - the first since 2002. The State Officers Compensation Commission (SOCC) outlined its raise recommendation at their May 30 meeting.

The SOCC discussed certain government officials’ salaries. It recommended a 10% pay increase for Michigan Supreme Court justices by 2022. The justices are currently paid $164,610, but the pay raise would increase their salaries to $172,841 in 2021 and $181,483 in 2022.

A Michigan State Police file photo.
Michigan State Police

The Michigan Supreme court ruled unanimously on Monday that a passenger in a car may challenge a police search of his personal property found in the vehicle. And it overruled its  2007 decision in People v. LaBelle that barred passengers from challenging a search of a car in which they were traveling. 

Michigan Supreme Court
Subterranean / Wikimedia Commons

State lawmakers want to go to the Michigan Supreme Court to find out if something they did in their last session is legal.

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Joe Gratz / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Michigan Supreme Court held its first oral argument sessions last week and agreed to take more cases.

The court heard oral arguments in almost a dozen cases over two days. In a lawsuit against a state agency, Department of Corrections employees say their jobs were reclassified to a lower pay grade even though they were performing the same tasks.

two headshots of women
Matt Mitchell/John Schultz

The Michigan Supreme Court will hear the first oral arguments of its new session January 23. Two of the seven justices on the court won their seats in November’s statewide election. Morning Edition host Doug Tribou spoke with the newly elected justices: Megan Cavanagh and Elizabeth Clement.

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