Michigan Veteran Affairs Agency | Michigan Radio
WUOMFM

Michigan Veteran Affairs Agency

State Representative Jason Wentworth (R) testifying before the House Military and Veterans Affairs Committee in February.
Michigan House Republicans

Republican State Representative Jason Wentworth serves Michigan's 97th district and is the chair of the House Military and Veterans Affairs Committee. He served in the United States Army, and before he was elected to the state House, he was a regional coordinator for the Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency (MVAA).

Earlier this year, he worked to get a bill signed into law that will — for the first time — make state funds available for county governments to help veterans apply for federal VA benefits.

Lawrence Dolph in 1969 (L) and now.
Courtesy of Lawrence Dolph

There are about six hundred thousand veterans in Michigan. That's the 11th highest in the nation, according to the U.S. Census. Yet Michigan has consistently ranked in the bottom five states and territories when it comes to helping veterans and their families access federal veteran benefits. These are benefits that could bring much needed assistance with finances, employment, and health care, to name a few.

Sign in front of Grand Rapids Home for Veterans
Google Maps

The Grand Rapids City Commission is scheduled to vote on whether to approve plans for a new veterans' home.

The city’s planning commission voted to approve the $49 million home for military veterans last week.

The current home houses about 260 people, but the new one would only house around 130 vets.

Daniel Waun, a spokesman at the Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency, says no one would be forced to move out of the old building.

 U.S. Army Surgeon General Lt. Gen. Patricia Horoho speaks on Capitol Hill for National Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Awareness Day June 27, 2012
user Army Medicine / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

As veterans return home after serving in the Middle East, the nation is becoming increasingly aware of post-traumatic stress injury.

PTSI affects millions of vets and significantly boosts the risk of depression, suicide, and drug- and alcohol-related deaths.

On top of that, for the veterans struggling with PTSI, it can lead to more run-ins with police.

man repairs front of wwii bomber
Flickr user England / Flickr

There's a lot of talk about supporting our military veterans as they come home and transition back to civilian life. The Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency is standing by to help vets in a variety of ways, from employment to benefits and resources to transition assistance.