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Mike Duggan

Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Detroiters will get a chance to vote in November on whether the city should borrow $250 million to tackle blight, after the Detroit City Council approved Mayor Mike Duggan’s proposal on Tuesday.

The Council vote was a narrow 5-4 victory for Duggan’s “Proposal N,” which would issue city-backed bonds for blight remediation. The plan calls for using $90 million to remediate and secure 8,000 vacant homes for later rehab, and $160 million for 8,000 demolitions. Duggan says the bond would not raise existing tax rates, which are otherwise set to drop below current levels as the city retires some debt.

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Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan announced on Wednesday that Detroit residents facing eviction due to COVID-19 can apply for legal aid and rental assistance.

The mayor said there would be $11.5 million dedicated to the program. He says the city is working with community organizations to get people help.

"We will get you to resources. United Community Housing Coalition has got lawyers for you if the landlord is evicting you in a way that is legally inappropriate, we've got good lawyers for you."

City of Detroit

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan said on Thursday that the Detroit Police Department and the Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office will be reviewing the events that led to the arrest of Robert Williams.

In January, Williams was arrested and held for more than a day on charges of larceny, despite the police only having a facial recognition technology match with an old driver's license photo. That match turned out to be false.

When asked about the case, Duggan said, “I’m very angry about that case, and join Prosecutor (Kym) Worthy in my apology to Mr. Williams. But you have to think of the case, and the case, in my mind, is about subpar detective work, and subpar warrant prosecutor work.”

Photo by Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Detroit is celebrating Juneteenth with a week-long series of events starting on Monday.

Juneteenth is celebrated on June 19. It commemorates the day in 1865 that slaves in Texas learned they would be freed.

City of Detroit

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan announced the creation of a health corps to help Detroiters during the COVID-19 pandemic. The deputy mayor, Conrad Mallett, Jr., says various municipal departments will meet over the next thirty days and develop a plan for what the corps will look like.

Duggan says Detroit residents have expressed concerns about water shutoffs, evictions, job losses, and access to medical care during the pandemic.

“I really envision a corps of folks who work for the health department who can reach out to those of low income and say we will be there to help you on these issues,” says Duggan.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Detroit city officials expect an 8 p.m. curfew will remain in place for a couple more days.

The curfew was put in place this week in response to confrontations between large groups of protesters and police.   

Dozens of protesters have been detained for violating the curfew. Although on Wednesday night, police did not enforce the curfew and protesters continued to march peacefully well after the curfew.

Ryan Patrick Hooper / WDET

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan praised protesters and the city’s police force for keeping the city relatively calm Monday night.

But Duggan cautioned on Tuesday that the city must remain on high alert—and will keep an 8 p.m. curfew throughout the week.

Dustin Dwyer / Michigan Radio

Two Michigan cities are imposing curfews after clashes between police and protesters this weekend.

Detroit and Grand Rapids have been rocked by vandalism and violence after rallies against police brutality against black people.

Detroit's curfew will begin at 8 p.m., and lift at 5 a.m.

Mike Duggan
detroitmi.gov

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan said he’s excited that some Michigan retail businesses will be able to re-open on Tuesday, but warns the city will be vigilant about enforcing health and safety standards meant to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer laid out those rules in an executive order that allows businesses “engaged in the selling of goods and the rendering of services incidental to the sale of the goods” to re-open. Sit-down restaurants, bars, gyms and fitness centers, and salons remain closed for now.

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

As the pandemic weeks turn into pandemic months, many questions remain about how we know what we know about COVID-19. One of the major limiting factors in testing for the virus is the availability of supplies for test kits.

City of Detroit

Starting Wednesday, any Detroit resident will be able to make an appointment to get tested for COVID-19.

Previously, free testing in Detroit was restricted to people with a doctor’s note, symptoms, essential workers and people over the age of 60.

Courtesy photo / City of Detroit

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan said he’s “entirely confident” in a rapid-response COVID-19 test the city has used heavily, despite some doubts raised about its accuracy.

Several small studies found the Abbott Labs 15-minute tests produce a significant number of false negative results. And the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued an alert about the tests, saying it’s still evaluating whether the tests produce too many false negatives.

Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

The city of Detroit is ramping up COVID-19 testing, with a focus on testing ‘at-risk’ seniors. Since May 1, 84% of Detroiters who've died from the disease have been over the age of 60.

Because of that, Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan says the city wants more senior citizens tested for the coronavirus.

Mike Duggan
detroitmi.gov

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan said Monday he’s confident that it’s now safe enough to start bringing more city employees back to work, but that’s only because of health and safety measures the city has implemented.

Duggan said the evidence for that lies in recent test results for frontline workers, such as first responders and bus drivers.

Workers set up a field hospital at the TCF Center in Detroit.
Paulette Parker, Michigan Radio

The last remaining COVID-19 patient at Detroit's TCF Center field hospital was discharged on Wednesday.

The 1,000-bed hospital, rapidly constructed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as the pandemic surged in southeast Michigan, has stopped admitting patients. It has treated just 39 people since it started up in early April.

flickr user Bernt Rostad / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Detroit City Council on Tuesday unanimously approved a new city budget for the city’s upcoming fiscal year. It included $348 million in cuts.

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan said the budget is balanced, but the COVID-19 pandemic made deep cuts necessary.

Paulette Parker / Michgian Radio

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan said on Monday that he’s confident the city can beat COVID-19 with focused testing and other precautionary measures.

Detroit has been hit hard by the pandemic, reporting 9,388 cases and 1,088 deaths so far. But both cases and deaths have steadily declined over the past two weeks.

Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit
Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan on Thursday urged Governor Gretchen Whitmer to re-open portions of the medical system that have been closed by the COVID-19 pandemic, saying some people’s medical needs are “being neglected.”

Whitmer put a freeze on “non-essential” medical and dental procedures on March 20, citing the need to conserve health care resources as the pandemic was surging.

Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan says the city is ready to jumpstart some construction projects that were delayed by the COVID-19 pandemic, but only with health protections in place.

All workers will need to get a COVID-19 test before they go back to work. They’ll also be required to wear masks, and employers will need to perform daily temperature screenings and symptom checks.

City of Detroit

The city of Detroit says it’s now tested all residents at its 26 nursing homes for COVID-19, and the next step is to test all nursing home staff.

Staff testing will be available for free at the former Michigan State Fairgrounds drive-thru testing site. That will become mandatory on May 11.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Monday, the city of Detroit will issue a public health order mandating grocery store workers be tested for coronavirus by May 11.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The city of Detroit is teaming up with investment banking giant Goldman Sachs to provide up to $15 million in loans to Detroit small businesses struggling during the COVID-19 pandemic.

David Solomon is the Chief Executive Officer of Goldman Sachs. He says small businesses have perhaps never been at more risk.

CDC

Experts from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control are helping the city of Detroit assess the COVID-19 spread in the city’s nursing homes.

124 Detroit nursing home residents have died since the outbreak began. Hundreds more have tested positive for the disease, though half showed no symptoms.

Many in Michigan are mourning the death of five-year-old Skylar Herbert, the state’s youngest victim of COVID-19. She died on Sunday. 

Her parents are a Detroit city police officer and a city firefighter. 

Mayor Mike Duggan called her “a true daughter of the city of Detroit.”

woman testing driver for coronavirus
Airman 1st Class Taylor D. Slater / U.S. Air Force

Starting Monday, the city of Detroit is offering COVID-19 testing for essential workers who do not have symptoms of the disease.

Mayor Mike Duggan says the state fairgrounds drive-thru testing site has more capacity now that surrounding counties have expanded their own testing. 

City of Detroit

Plummeting casino, property and income tax revenues are forcing Detroit’s mayor to raid the city’s savings accounts and trim its workforce.

Mayor Mike Duggan says the city is facing a $348 million budget gap over the next 16 months because of the loss tax revenue tied to the COVID-19 pandemic.

City of Detroit

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan says Duggan says nearly every trend is heading in an “encouraging direction” in the city’s fight against the COVID-19 pandemic.

Michigan’s largest city has been at the epicenter of the state’s fight with the coronavirus.

To date, Detroit has recorded 395 deaths and 6,781 people testing positive for the coronavirus.  

But Mayor Duggan says there are signs the city’s struggles are easing.

sign in detroit
Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan said on Friday that the city’s rate of COVID-19 infections and deaths are rising more slowly—but that’s “nothing to celebrate.”

On Friday, Detroit reported 6,218 COVID-19 cases and 327 deaths. While it saw its biggest single-day spike in deaths on Friday, Duggan said the doubling rate of deaths has been stretched from 3-4 days to 7-8 days.

Workers set up hospital beds at the TCF Center field hospital in Detroit.
Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan says the city may not need all of the 1,000 beds set up at the TCF Center

The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers has been transforming the former Cobo Center into a COVID-19 field hospital. The center is expected to start accepting patients this week.    

person holding test tubes with blue gloves on
Trust "Tru" Katsande / Unsplash

Residents and staff at nursing homes in the city of Detroit will get tested for COVID-19 starting Wednesday.

The city has 27 nursing homes with 12 COVID-19 related deaths across them, and 14 of the homes have reported at least one case of COVID-19.

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