MorningSide 48224 | Michigan Radio
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MorningSide 48224

paper money and coins spread out
Mathieu Turle / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, how have communities across Michigan fared in the nearly 10 years since the official end of the Great Recession? Plus, a conversation with a chef from Detroit who’s elevating the art of cannabis edibles beyond the usual pot brownie. 

Fight for the Bando

Jan 7, 2019
barelyhispanic

 

My name is Matthew Green. I am from the eastside of Detroit. When I say I know the inner city. I mean that I know the inner city! I am 24 years old. I am old enough to have a mature mind-state about things, but young enough to connect with the youth.

Public Safety, Personal Experiences

Nov 28, 2018

I'm Scotty Boman. I was born and raised in Detroit and have been a resident of the MorningSide community in the 48224 for 15 years.  As a child, I lived just across the street from what is now MorningSide on East Outer Drive, and I attended church and Boy Scout meetings at what was then Christ United Methodist Church. I remember viewing feature films at the Alger. I have fond memories of building model boats and cars at the Cannon Recreation Center that was adjoining Finney High School.  East English Village Academy is now there.

 Reimund Holzhey mugshot
Courtesy of Michigan History Center

Today on Stateside, after a contentious city council meeting, Kalamazoo is moving to meet the demands of homeless protestors camped out in a downtown park. Plus, nationally-recognized teacher Matinga Ragatz talks about why she thinks school reform is hurting, not helping, students.

Traditional media outlets have enhanced their community presence, oftentimes these communities have established networks of communication, engagement, and in some cases, content production.

 

Take MorningSide for example. The neighborhood is home to two podcast studios. One belongs to Jonathan “JG” Galloway of Audio Wave Network and another is housed at the Bethany Lutheran Church which is led by Pastor Christopher Bodley.

 

The MorningSide divide

Aug 15, 2018
Kate Gowman

I grew up in Detroit during the ‘80s, a period of recession and white flight. As industry left, our community went from being a stable middle-class neighborhood to one that was falling apart at the seams. Cultural centers disappeared and money for education and other city services evaporated.

Mr. Earl's neighborhood

Jun 25, 2018

 

Long before the city of Detroit rebranded itself, a tight-knit neighborhood on the far east side decided to make a name for itself. The community formerly known as NEAR (Neighborhood East Area Residents) wanted a name that could state their wishes, dreams, hopes and struggles aloud.

In this special episode, MorningSide 48224 teams up with WYPR's Out of the Blocks to share voices from MorningSide.

On the east side of Detroit, the streets of MorningSide are lined with stately, brick Tudor-style houses. But today, one in four of those houses is abandoned, boarded up, gutted, or burned out.

The foreclosure crisis of 2008 hit MorningSide like a tidal wave, and the neighborhood is struggling to sprout again from the rubble. There’s a lot of buzz about a new Renaissance in downtown Detroit, but the locals in this corner of town are wondering when – and if – the revival is going to make its way to them. In the meantime, they’re holding their own and looking out for each other.

Family photos document memories and milestones in MorningSide.
Ali Lapetina

Over three generations, grandmother Patricia Robinson, mother Tamiko Clark, and daughter DaTrice Clark have lived on the same street in MorningSide. Their family story doubles as a history lesson in the neighborhood.