Mosquito | Michigan Radio
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Mosquito

three mexican gray wolf pups
Courtesy of the Binder Park Zoo

Tests confirm two Mexican gray wolf pups at southern Michigan zoo have died of a rare mosquito-borne virus as health officials work to curb the spread of the virus in people and animals.

Binder Park Zoo in Battle Creek says results received this week confirm the pups that died in early September were killed by Eastern equine encephalitis, which is also known as Triple-E. The two wolves were part of a litter born June 14 to a breeding pair of wolves at the zoo. The one wolf pup who survived appears healthy and is being monitored along with her parents. 

A mosquito
flickr user trebol-a / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

State health officials have confirmed an eighth case of the mosquito-borne virus called Eastern-Equine-Encephalitis, or Triple-E.

Three people in Michigan have died from the virus this year. The Michigan Department of Health and Human services says Triple-E has a 33% fatality rate. The latest person to contract the virus is an adult in Calhoun County. 

All eight human cases are in southwest Michigan. But confirmed cases of Triple-E in animals pose a risk to people in 11 counties across the Lower Peninsula.

A mosquito
flickr user trebol-a / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Updated Tuesday September 19 at 11:45 a.m.:

There are now four additional confirmed cases of a mosquito-borne virus called Eastern Equine Encephalitis, two of which have been fatal, in Southwest Michigan. It brings the total to seven cases and three deaths since a July onset. 

A mosquito
flickr user trebol-a / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Mosquito control briquettes have been applied to nearly 18,000 catch basins in a Detroit suburb. Warren says it's the first application of the mosquito repellants this year by public works employees. Another application is scheduled for August.

Mosquitoes can breed in catch basins, tire swings, buckets, and anything else that holds standing water.

Warren Mayor James Fouts says the control measures are aimed at protecting residents from West Nile virus and other illnesses that can be contracted from mosquitoes and ticks.