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Jeff Daniels
Luc Daniels

Michigan’s favorite son is back, and is biding his time at home like the rest of us. Jeff Daniels, esteemed actor, playwright, and musician, released his new album late last year. It’s aptly titled “Alive and Well Enough,” which pretty much sums up how many of us are doing these days. He joined Stateside to talk about the album, politics, and his virtual concert at the Midland Center for the Arts on Friday, January 29.

Courtesy of Eddie Gillis and Third Man Pressing

When Frank Solis found the tapes, he almost threw them out.

He and his family — as well as the music world — had assumed that his father, Michigander and Tejano music pioneer Martin Huron Solis Jr., had never recorded the songs that made him a pioneer in Detroit’s music scene of the 1940s and ‘50s. Though Martin was inducted into the Tejano R.O.O.T.S. Hall of Fame in 2018, he was best known for his compelling live performances and hadn’t ever released an album with his fellow musicians, who made up Los Primos.

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Today on Stateside, a look at the year in music. We review the latest records from Michigan musicians—released despite all the live event cancellations brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic—with music aficionado John Sinkevics, the editor and publisher of Local Spins. Plus, we revisit recent releases from Flint musician Tunde Olaniran and Albion-turned-Nashville duo The War and Treaty.

Photo by David McClister

This has been a complicated year. It’s brought pain and grief, as well as lessons about love and hope. For musicians Michael Trotter Jr. and Tanya Blount Trotter, 2020 has been “eye-opening.” The duo, who until recently were living in Albion, now perform as The War and Treaty. 

Two auto workers on an assembly line
AUTOMOTIVEAUTO.INFO

Today on Stateside, only eight days remain until Election Day. We take a look at the race for the 3rd congressional district currently held by U.S. Representative Justin Amash (L-MI 3). And what auto workers are listening for from presidential candidates.  Also, a new country album offers a wistful twang for these trying times.

books lined up
Jessica Ruscello / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, a long-time educator discussed how racism and Black history is taught in schools. Plus, a cultural arts center in Detroit that’s finding ways to survive when the economy crumbles but the mission is more important than ever. And Congresswoman Brenda Lawrence (MI-14) discussed Juneteenth, and the need for a national dialogue about reparations.

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Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.

the album cover of Nadir Omowale's single "Run"
Original Artwork by Jabarr Harper

Like many artists and activists right now, artist and producer Nadir Omowale has been reflecting on and reacting to the protests against police brutality happening in Michigan and across the country. It inspired Omowale to finally release a song he's been working on for years. It’s dropping on Juneteenth, a day that celebrates the end of slavery in America. He’s been working on the song since 1998. It’s called “Run.”

screenshot of TouTube video of students playing instruments
Monroe High School

Michigan schools are wrapping up a year like no other. As COVID-19 closed K-12 buildings, teachers and students struggled to recreate the chemistry of some group activities.

Nathália Rosa / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, we’ll check in with former Michigan Radio reporter Bryce Huffman, who started working for BridgeDetroit—a newsroom made up entirely of people of color—just days before George Floyd was killed by police and Black Lives Matter protests took hold across the globe. Also, a conversation with a Detroit radio journalist about the music that made the city an indelible part of punk history.

(Subscribe to Stateside on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or with this RSS link)

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Today on Stateside, a look at how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected the housing market. We talk with an affordable housing expert to find out what the public health crisis means for renters, particularly as expiration dates for eviction moratoriums approach. Also, an update from Michigan’s chief medical officer, with the latest on the state’s response to the pandemic. Plus, a musical love letter to the National Park System.

Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha speaks at a book signing
umseas / CreativeCommons

Today on Stateside, we talk to Dr. Mona Hanna Attisha, who tested positive for COVID-19. Plus, we talk to children who just found out the rest of their school year is cancelled.

(Subscribe to Stateside on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or with this RSS link)

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below

Erin Zindle and the Ragbirds performing at a Live from the Birds Nest concert
Courtesy of Erin Zindle

  

The ban on public gatherings due to the coronavirus outbreak has hit a lot of sectors hard. One group grappling with how to make a living now is musicians, who rely on live concerts for most of their income. With bars and venues shuttered, some artists are now getting creative about reaching their fans from an appropriate social distance.

An absentee ballot in an envelope.
Nadya Peek / Flickr

Today on Stateside, a bill to give local clerks a head start on absentee ballot counting has hit a wall in the Legislature. We'll hear from one clerk who's going back to the drawing board. Plus, a conversation with the owner of an Ann Arbor record store owner about the albums he's listening to and loving right now. 

arms in striped shirt going through a record crate
Annie Theby / Unsplash

In 2020, we want to remind you—and ourselves—of the importance of taking a break. And what better way to do that than to take an old (or new) record off the shelf and spin a few tunes? We’re inviting folks from some Michigan record stores we love to talk about what they're listening to right now.

Samantha Forsyth and Grace Trudell
Sam Corey / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, what does the ongoing United Auto Workers strike against General Motors tell us about the role of American labor in the nation's economy today? Plus, two women at opposite ends of the same career path talk about what it takes to succeed in the male-dominated electrical trade.

Sesame Street: Tiny Desk Concert

Jun 10, 2019

Don't see the video above? Click here.

This just in: The Muppets have arrived at NPR!

The news has stopped!

Count von Count and the NPR kids count us down: 5 ... 4 ... 3 ... 2 ... 1!

March Madness begins this week. The huge college basketball tournament starts with 68 teams and will eventually end with one national champion. But for some in northern Michigan, March Madness means more than basketball. For 10-year-old Ricky Bristol, who lives in East Jordan, it means practicing his violin.


Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

In a nondescript building in Marshall, Derek Smith is reaming a hole to fit a tuning key into head of a mandolin. That sound is a squeaky and a little irritating. 

It wasn't long before I asked Smith if he could create a different sound. I asked him to play something on one of the mandolins in the shop, a much better sound.

Smith and the rest of the team at Northfield Mandolins make high-end instruments. And the demand for the mandolins is brisk.

Map of 1,4-dioxane plume in Ann Arbor.
Scio Residents for Safe Water

Today on Stateside, Ann Arbor officials announced last week that trace amounts of a chemical known as 1,4-dioxane had been found in the city's drinking water for the first time. So, what does that mean for residents? Plus, if you feel like popular songs aren't as happy as they used to be, a new study says you're right. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Maddie in front of a music stand on stage
Long Haul Productions

When you learn how to make art – whether it’s oil painting or playing in a rock band – you develop more than just a talent.

It can also help you learn some pretty important life lessons about things like failure and vulnerability.

3 members of 7 Bold Banana Slugs
Long Haul Productions

Stateside is featuring intimate, first-person stories about the power of art in a new series called Creating Connection Michigan.

Today, we hear from Penny, a camper at Girls Rock Detroit. It’s a program where girls ages 8 to 15 form a band, learn how to play an instrument, write a song, and perform it in front of a live audience – all in the course of a week. 

Rapper Mona Haydar
Natalie Brennan

Syrian-American rapper Mona Haydar describes herself as a poet, an activist, a God-enthusiast, and a feminist.

The Flint native is known for her 2017 breakout hit “Hijabi,” a song about Muslim women choosing to wear the traditional headscarf as an expression of their faith. Haydar recently released her latest EP, Barbarican.

Leonard Slatkin (left) is Music Director of the Detroit Symphony, and conductor Chelsea Gallo (right) is pursuing a Doctorate of Musical Arts at the University of Michigan.
Sarah Leeson

When you bring two people from opposite ends of the same career path together, chances are they’ll have plenty to talk about.

Stateside's ongoing Work in Progress series aims to do just that by featuring conversations between someone just starting out in a particular field and someone who is reaching the end of their professional career. 

Leonard Slatkin is Music Director Laureate of the Detroit Symphony, and conductor Chelsea Gallo is pursuing a Doctorate of Musical Arts at the University of Michigan. 

patricia hall and unknown student
University of Michigan School of Music, Theater, and Dance

The Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camps were brutal and violent places. By the end of the Holocaust, an estimated 1.1 million people died or were murdered there by their Nazi captors.

A white car with a sign atop it reading "driver education student driver."
Wikimedia Commons / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, General Motors announced that it will end production at several facilities across the nation, including two here in Michigan. Plus, the editor of a new collection of Joni Mitchell interviews talks about the singer-songwriter’s rise to fame and her musical debut in Detroit’s folk scene. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Image of Joni Mitchell smoking a cigarette.
Marty Getz / Courtesy of Susan Whitall

Joni Mitchell is one of the most influential singer-songwriters in music history. But earning that title was no simple feat.

Susan Whitall, former writer and editor for the magazine Creem, has edited a new book about Mitchell's life and career called Joni on Joni: Interviews and Encounters with Joni Mitchell. The book is an anthology of interviews with Mitchell that took place between 1966 and 2014.

Steven Piper

Today, Stateside speaks with Michigan’s new Governor-elect Gretchen Whitmer to discuss her top priorities when she takes office, the Line 5 pipeline, and her plans to work with the Republican leadership in the state Legislature. Plus, Tunde Olaniran, a Flint native and staple of the Detroit music scene, discusses his new album with us.

northern lights above the mackinac bridge
Wall Boat / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, an explosive lawsuit against Michigan State University alleges that Larry Nassar raped an MSU athlete in 1992, and university officials covered it up. Plus, the best plays and musicals from Michigan’s local theater scene this month.

Elvis Presley
WikiCommons

 


On Thursday, August 16 we lost the Queen of Soul, Aretha Franklin. But for countless Elvis fans, last Thursday was already a date marked by tragedy. 

On that day in 1977, the world learned that Elvis Presley had passed away. 

 

Derek Smith
Sarah Leeson / Michigan Radio

When you think of a mandolin, you may think of Europe during the Renaissance or bluegrass music from the South. But it turns out the mandolin actually has roots right here in Michigan.

This past weekend, mandolin enthusiasts descended on Marshall, Michigan for the Marshall Mandolin Summit. Visitors spent the weekend sharing their love for the instrument and learning under world-renowned mandolin players like Don Julin, author of Mandolin for Dummiesand Mike Marshall (no relation to the town).

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