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Native American

A sign that says "Honor the Treaties" hangs between two trees against a snowy landscape.
Kaye LaFond / Michigan Radio

On a chilly day in early January, the ground at Camp Anishinaabek is covered in a foot of snow, extra crusty from thawing and re-freezing. The outdoor firepit where campers gather in warmer weather is deserted, and instead, they've congregated in a dark, slightly smoky tent.

close up of two doors on a car  that say Detroit Police
Sean Davis / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, new reporting contradicts the city of Detroit’s claim that police response times are going down. Plus, advocates are cheering a law passed during lame duck that makes it easier for people experiencing homelessness to get state ID cards. 

Image of a magazine clipping
Michigan History Magazine

Thirty years ago, in January of 1989, Michigan Native artwork and pottery took a journey to the Soviet Union. An exhibition was held at an Art Institute in St. Petersburg.

Today on Stateside, we chatted with Sandra Clark, director of the Michigan History Center, and Frank Ettawageshik, a member of the Little Traverse Bands of Odawa. We talked with our guests about Michigan Native American Art and its contribution to an Exhibition in the Soviet Union.

Three men and one woman sit at a table on a stage.
Kaye LaFond / Michigan Radio

A northern Michigan Indigenous tribe hosted its own political town hall in preparation for the upcoming elections.

The Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians invited Michigan candidates at the U.S., state and local levels to discuss environmental issues in a moderated forum last Friday evening in Peshawbestown.

A photo of the Cheboiganing Band village before it was burned in 1900.
Courtesy of the Burt Lake Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians

This is the final part of our series An Idea on the Land. Here's where you can find Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3. 

On a chilly morning, 118 autumns ago, the residents of a tiny village along a lake in Northern Michigan were forced out of their homes and kicked off the land they had legally purchased.

The residents were native people, members of what was then called the Cheboiganing Band of Indians. There’s some evidence native people had been living at that site for thousands of years.

But since that morning, on Oct. 15, 1900, their land has been in the hands of others. And the descendants of those who were there that morning are still fighting for justice and recognition in the courts today.

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New York Public Library Digital Collections

We are of the dirt.

That’s what Willie Jennings believes.

“My mother was a gardener,” he says. Each spring, as she got her garden ready, she would spray water on the dirt, and tell him to plunge his hands deep into the wet soil.

“And she would turn to me and say, ‘You feel that? You feel that son? That’s life.'”