Native American | Michigan Radio
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Native American

Little Traverse Bay
Michigan Radio

 

Today on Stateside, Planned Parenthood withdraws from Title X which funds services for 42,000 patients in Michigan. Plus, new Oakland County County Executive Dave Coulter is the first Democrat in 27 years.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

A roll of "Voted" stickers
Element 5 Digital / Unsplash

 


Today on Stateside, Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson comments on how an increase in the number of absentee ballots could impact elections without a change in state law. Plus, the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians is building a manufacturing center in an effort to diversify the tribe's economic ventures.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement - or ICE - agents
U.S. Air Force

 

 

Today on Stateside, former Michigander Jimmy Aldaoud was deported to Iraq, a country he had never been to, in June. This week, his family says he died after not being able to obtain insulin for his diabetes. We talk to a family friend about what happened. Plus, the challenges of finding inclusive long-term care facilities when you're an LGBT senior.

 

Angie Shinos (left) and Sage Hegdal (right) sit back to back and Angie holds a baby doll up to a colorful cloth breast
April Van Buren / Michigan Radio

For every 1,000 Native American babies born in Michigan, more than 14 don’t reach their first birthday. That’s more than triple the infant mortality rate for white babes. But tribal communities in Michigan are working to change that. And they’re doing it, in part, by reviving traditional cultural practices around pregnancy and motherhood.

a map shows the straits of mackinac with some satellite imagery
screenshot from Enbridge report to the state

Indigenous governments and activists in the Great Lakes have been leaders in the movement to shut down the twin oil pipelines that run under the Mackinac Straits.

Now, one of the most visible people in that movement has left his tribal government job and set up his own consulting firm. One of his clients? The pipelines’ owner, Enbridge Energy.

This sudden change has upset indigenous communities in the region, and some worry it’s a “divide-and-conquer” tactic.

striped safety cones on a road
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, how the state is carrying out infrastructure projects it can't afford to maintain. Plus, an Interlochen Public Radio investigation into the Grand Traverse County Correctional Facility after multiple former female inmates claimed that some officers were ignoring their requests for basic personal hygiene products. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

A sign that says "Honor the Treaties" hangs between two trees against a snowy landscape.
Kaye LaFond / Michigan Radio

On a chilly day in early January, the ground at Camp Anishinaabek is covered in a foot of snow, extra crusty from thawing and re-freezing. The outdoor firepit where campers gather in warmer weather is deserted, and instead, they've congregated in a dark, slightly smoky tent.

close up of two doors on a car  that say Detroit Police
Sean Davis / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today on Stateside, new reporting contradicts the city of Detroit’s claim that police response times are going down. Plus, advocates are cheering a law passed during lame duck that makes it easier for people experiencing homelessness to get state ID cards. 

Image of a magazine clipping
Michigan History Magazine

Thirty years ago, in January of 1989, Michigan Native artwork and pottery took a journey to the Soviet Union. An exhibition was held at an Art Institute in St. Petersburg.

Today on Stateside, we chatted with Sandra Clark, director of the Michigan History Center, and Frank Ettawageshik, a member of the Little Traverse Bands of Odawa. We talked with our guests about Michigan Native American Art and its contribution to an Exhibition in the Soviet Union.

Three men and one woman sit at a table on a stage.
Kaye LaFond / Michigan Radio

A northern Michigan Indigenous tribe hosted its own political town hall in preparation for the upcoming elections.

The Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians invited Michigan candidates at the U.S., state and local levels to discuss environmental issues in a moderated forum last Friday evening in Peshawbestown.

A photo of the Cheboiganing Band village before it was burned in 1900.
Courtesy of the Burt Lake Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians

This is the final part of our series An Idea on the Land. Here's where you can find Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3. 

On a chilly morning, 118 autumns ago, the residents of a tiny village along a lake in Northern Michigan were forced out of their homes and kicked off the land they had legally purchased.

The residents were native people, members of what was then called the Cheboiganing Band of Indians. There’s some evidence native people had been living at that site for thousands of years.

But since that morning, on Oct. 15, 1900, their land has been in the hands of others. And the descendants of those who were there that morning are still fighting for justice and recognition in the courts today.

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New York Public Library Digital Collections

We are of the dirt.

That’s what Willie Jennings believes.

“My mother was a gardener,” he says. Each spring, as she got her garden ready, she would spray water on the dirt, and tell him to plunge his hands deep into the wet soil.

“And she would turn to me and say, ‘You feel that? You feel that son? That’s life.'”