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Net Neutrality

building that says federal communications commission
Dion Hinchcliffe / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 


The Federal Communications Commission is implementing what it calls the Restoring Internet Freedom order. That order repeals net neutrality rules implemented by the Obama administration in 2015. 

FCC Chair Ajit Pai calls the order a repeal of “unnecessary and harmful internet regulations." Opponents call it a repeal of "internet neutrality protections."

The FCC voted along party lines with the three Republicans voting for the repeal and the two Democrats voting against it.

Brendan Carr is one of the Republican FCC Commissioners who voted for the repeal. Carr spoke with Stateside about the impact this order will have on the internet consumer. 

USDAgov / CREATIVE COMMONS - HTTP://MICHRAD.IO/1LXRDJM

The U.S. Senate is taking up net neutrality today. A bill that would protect net neutrality rules from repeal by the Federal Communications Commission passed a procedural hurdle earlier this afternoon.

These Obama-era rules prevented internet service providers like Verizon and Comcast, for example, from speeding up or slowing down traffic from certain apps and websites. Barring changes made by Congress and signed by the President, the FCC's repeal of these rules is set to go into effect on June 11.

Senator Gary Peters sits across a table from Stateside host Cynthia Canty.
Michigan Radio

The Trump administration has rolled out its plan to respond to violence and guns in our schools. It wants to provide firearms training to some teachers. But it has backed off on making major changes to gun legislation: For example, there’s nothing about raising the minimum age to buy guns from 18 to 21.

Following the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in Parkland, Florida, where 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz has admitted killing 17 people, President Trump said he was in favor of raising the minimum age but backed off after meeting with the National Rifle Association.

Mark Bonica / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 

Late last year, the Federal Communications Commission got rid of rules meant to keep the internet free and open, and to treat all traffic equally. So what can internet users expect this year? 

Senator Debbie Stabenow
USDAgov / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The clock is ticking down to when the U.S. Congress is scheduled to leave for its holiday break.

But a lot could happen within this next week, especially with Congress poised to deal with several major issues, including the Republicans’ tax overhaul and funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program.

Michigan Senator Debbie Stabenow sat down with Stateside to discuss those issues and more.

Catherine Shaffer / Michigan Radio

Ann Arbor activists joined protestors nationwide today to speak out against the FCC's planned rollback of net neutrality rules.

Net neutrality regulations enacted in 2015 require that all internet traffic is treated the same by internet service providers. Once the regulations are eliminated, providers would in theory be able to block, slow down, or charge extra for access to certain web sites. 

building that says federal communications commission
Dion Hinchcliffe / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Next Idea

In the early 1990s, I visited billionaire George Soros’ office in New York City to provide some direction on an investment his firm had made in a technology startup run by senior Israeli Air Force officers. Their technology was something akin to an iPod, and this was almost a decade before you could store your entire music collection on a device the size of a bar of soap.

Activists gather along President Obama's motorcade route in Los Angeles on July 23, 2014, to push for net neutrality.
flickr user Free Press/Free Press Action Fund / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

When a federal court of appeals upheld net neutrality, a lot of people applauded. Equal access to the internet for everyone seems right.

Right?

Well, there are some concerns. Not all internet use is the same.

Flickr user Dennis Skley / Flickr

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission is expected to vote tomorrow on a proposal that could impact the way you use and pay for your Internet.

The debate is around "net neutrality."