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no fault auto insurance

Looking down on a hand holding an open bottle of prescription drugs.
Sharyn Morrow / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

 

Today on Stateside, a look at how the no-fault auto insurance changes could affect health care. Plus, out-of-pocket drug costs are still rising, and it’s not clear where a solution could come from.

 

Long-term care provider: No-fault changes would ensure your car’s repaired but not necessarily your body

 

 

Michigan Radio

 

 

Today on Stateside, Michigan bean farmers send a lot of exports to Mexico. So, what happens to those farmers if President Trump follows through on his threats to add tariffs to Mexican goods? Plus, we hear about a tricked out bicycle with accordion and percussion instruments that blends classical music and public art. 

Car accident
Kadmy / Adobe Stock

 

A recent study by the University of Michigan found auto insurance rates are unaffordable for residents in 97% of Michigan counties.

 

The high rates are especially tough on low-income residents in Detroit, where auto insurance rates average $5,414 a year. So, would recent changes to the state's auto insurance law, passed by state lawmakers last week, help those drivers most in need of relief? 

two cars in a rear ending accident
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Governor Gretchen Whitmer says an agreement has been reached in concept on bipartisan changes to Michigan's auto insurance laws.

car crash
W. Robert Howell / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Michigan Legislature is holding a rare Friday session as negotiators make progress on a deal for changes to the state's auto insurance laws.

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and Republican legislative leaders have been trying to cut a deal in closed door talks.   

A Republican Senate caucus spokeswoman says progress is “progressing."

The Trump Administration's budget would eliminate the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

Today on Stateside, the Michigan House and Senate both passed bills this week that would allow drivers to opt out of the unlimited medical benefits mandated by current law. But critics say that giving up those benefits would do more harm than good. Plus, we talk to the author of a murder mystery novel that takes place on a fictional Michigan university campus.

Car accident
Kadmy / Adobe Stock

Updated: Thursday, May 9 at 6:30 a.m.

The Republican-led state House early Thursday approved an overhaul that would let people opt out of mandatory unlimited medical coverage for car crashes. The Senate passed a plan earlier this week.

Emilio Gutierrez Soto
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we talk with Congresswoman Debbie Dingell about efforts to halt the deportation of Mexican journalist and University of Michigan Knight-Wallace Fellow Emilio Gutierrez Soto. Plus, we check in with Wayne County Executive Warren Evans about the state of the county's finances.

Listen above for the full show, or find individual segments below.

Political roundup: Unlimited medical benefits, lack of transparency contribute to high auto insurance rates

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Detroit’s mayor calls Michigan’s no-fault auto insurance law “morally indefensible.”

Mayor Mike Duggan took his campaign to change the law to the state capitol Wednesday.

Duggan outlined what he says are the problems with Michigan’s high auto insurance rates to the state Senate Insurance and Banking Committee.

DJ Carmody / Michigan Radio

State lawmakers are once again considering changes to Michigan’s auto insurance laws.

But it’s a battle they’ve been losing for years.

When asked Thursday to identify his top legislative goal, Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey (R-Clarklake) said reforming Michigan no-fault auto insurance law.

But he’s quick to admit overcoming the medical and legal lobbies will be difficult.

car with dented bumper
Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

Plans to change Michigan’s auto no-fault law will likely not make it to the governor’s desk this year. Lawmakers in the state House have been considering taking up the issue – and they still might. But with only days left in this session, the Senate is unlikely to follow suit.

cars on a highway
Joe Shlabotnik / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

 


Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan and a handful of residents have filed a federal lawsuit against the state of Michigan over the high cost of auto insurance.  

Michigan’s average rate is twice that of the national average. In Detroit, no-fault auto insurance costs about six thousand dollars a year.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A federal lawsuit filed Thursday is challenging Michigan’s no-fault auto insurance law.

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan is among the plaintiffs suing the state Insurance agency. The other plaintiffs represent a wide mix of people from different parts of the state.

Robbie Howell / Flickr

Michigan's mandatory fee to cover unlimited medical benefits for injured drivers is rising to $192 a year.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new report says Michigan’s auto insurance rates are still the highest in the nation.

The ZEBRA is a company that tracks auto insurance rates across the country.

Zebra’s Alyssa Connelly says the average annual auto premium in Michigan is about $2600, which is nearly twice the national average.  According to the report, North Carolina motorists pay the lowest annual premiums ($865). 

The 2018 State of Auto Insurance Report finds motorists in Detroit pay $5,414, on average.

ROBBIE HOWELL / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Michigan's no-fault auto insurance law is seen as the "gold standard" in this country in terms of medical care for drivers badly hurt in a car accident.

Michigan also has the highest insurance costs in the nation, and although various fixes have been floated through the years, nothing gets traction in the state legislature.

two cars in a rear ending accident
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A plan to overhaul the state’s auto insurance system failed late Thursday night.

The bill would have gotten rid of the requirement that everyone have unlimited personal injury coverage. Instead, drivers would have been able to choose from three levels of coverage.

Speaker of the House Tom Leonard (R-DeWitt) blamed Democrats for the failure. Leonard said he was always clear that he would need 10 to 15 Democrats for the bill to pass.

"Out of water" sign after Oakland County water main break
Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

Thousands of people in Oakland County are still dealing with a mandatory boil water advisory this weekend. It was issued after a broken water transmission main caused system pressure to drop, and then extended after another leak was detected. The CEO of the Great Lakes Water Authority called it an "unprecedented" event in the regional water system's history, but this Week in Review, senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry tells Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth why he wasn't surprised.

Car accident
Daniel X. O'Neil/Flickr / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

A fight in Lansing over car insurance reform is once again pitting concerns over affordability against concerns about coverage for catastrophic car crashes.

At least one Democratic state representative from Detroit is supportive of a legislative plan that would get rid of the state requirement that all drivers purchase unlimited personal injury protection with their auto insurance.

wrecked car
Robbie Howell / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The state legislature held a marathon committee hearing on a bill to overhaul Michigan’s auto insurance law Tuesday. The committee heard ideas for potential changes to the bill.

One idea is to prevent insurance companies from using credit scores to influence rates.

Mayor Mike Duggan had a major hand in crafting the bill the committee discussed. He said he’d like to see changes to the bill; but he said the focus needs to be on passing immediate rate relief.

It’s not always gridlock and stalemate in Lansing. The left and right seem to have come together to solve a lingering controversy. But, can it last?

A plan in the state Legislature that would hurry up getting rid of driver responsibility fees appears to be on a fast track in Lansing. These fees are surcharges tacked onto traffic fines. Lawmakers approved them in 2003 in order to fill what was then a big hole in the state budget.

State Farm / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Last week in Crain’s Detroit BusinessChad Livengood wrote about how Detroit factory workers are charged more than lawyers for auto insurance. Livengood joined Stateside to explain a new study that looked at why rates are so high in the city. 

The study, conducted by California researcher Douglas Heller, tested six major insurance carriers using a 30-year-old female profile. It found the rates she received varied widely depending on her level of education, job title, and area of the state she lived in.

Car accident
Daniel X. O'Neil/Flickr / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

If you’re a driver in Michigan, it's not exactly breaking news to hear that our auto insurance rates are some of the highest in the country. Drivers in Detroit pay the most. One study estimated an average of $3,400 annually. By comparison, the national average is about $900.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/christopherbibbs/2380738854/

Detroiters pay some of the highest auto insurance rates of anyone in the country. A significant share of the city’s residents do not make enough to pay for continuous insurance coverage. That presents problems when it comes time to get a vehicle registered.

As a result, many have turned to a legal workaround called 7-day auto insurance. Now, that loophole may be closing. 

gobankingrates.com reports that Michigan is the most expensive state to own a car.
flickr user Jeff B / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Anyone who drives in Michigan is no stranger to the high cost of auto insurance in the state.

A study from gobankingrates.com finds the high cost of insurance contributes to Michigan being the most expensive state to own a car.

According to the study, it costs nearly $5,000 annually to own and maintain a vehicle in Michigan, with more than half that cost coming in the form of auto insurance premiums.

The Michigan House of Representatives in Lansing
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio file photo

The lame duck session wrapped up in Lansing this week. In this Week in Review, Michigan Radio Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry talk about bills that made it through the Legislature and one that didn't. They also discuss an important anniversary in the Flint water crisis.

An anniversary in Flint

Something good came from Michigan's recount

Dec 15, 2016

Well, regardless of your politics, you can’t say nothing good came out of the aborted Michigan recount.

Chris Thomas, the state’s longtime elections director, said last night that Detroit will get new voting machines before the city elections next year.

Car accident
Ted Abbott/Flickr

A group of insurance companies that sets a mandatory car insurance fee does not have to say how it comes up with that fee. That decision came today from the Michigan Court of Appeals.

The Michigan Catastrophic Claims Association was created by an act of the Legislature, but it’s run by insurance companies. This year, the MCCA collects $160 on every insured vehicle. The money is used to pay the most-expensive medical bills of victims of car crashes.

Car rear ended another car in Ann Arbor.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Why is it that the poorest people in Michigan, the ones who face the biggest struggle to find jobs and get to those jobs, are paying the highest auto insurance rates in the country?

Lessenberry explains LGBT issues and no-fault car insurance headlines

Apr 29, 2015
user Marlith / flickr.com

This Week in Michigan Politics, Jack Lessenberry breaks down what happened during the U.S. Supreme Court's hearing over gay marriage bans in Michigan and other states, why the state Senate also held a hearing on a religious freedom bill that same day, and why Michigan has the highest insurance rate in the country and possible changes to fix that. 


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