Opioid | Michigan Radio
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Opioid

Updated at 4:20 p.m. ET

Attorneys for local governments across the country unveiled a plan Friday that they say would move the nation closer to a global settlement of lawsuits stemming from the deadly opioid crisis.

Final payouts could rival the massive tobacco settlements of the 1990s. Such a deal, if reached, could funnel tens of billions of dollars to communities struggling with the opioid addiction crisis, while restoring stability to one of the country's biggest industries.

narcan kit
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Three bills that would allow people such as librarians and teachers to administer treatments for opioid overdoses are being considered in Michigan's state Senate. They are Sen. Paul Wojno's Senate Bill 200, Sen. Curtis Vanderwall's Senate Bill 282, and Peter Lucido's Senate Bill 283.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Legislation allowing libraries to stock and administer opioid overdose drugs is on pace to reach the governor’s desk by June. The state Senate Health Policy committee approved four bills Thursday.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint is the latest Michigan city to file a lawsuit against the nation’s largest manufacturers of opioid drugs.

Lawyers for the city filed a 111 page brief in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan on Monday. 

prescription drugs
flickr/Charles Williams / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Patients who are prescribed opioids for post-surgical pain only use a quarter of their prescriptions on average, according to a new study.

The study from the University of Michigan looked at 2,392 surgical patients across 33 of the state's health systems.

State launches new website to help fight opioid epidemic

Oct 24, 2018
person shaking prescription pills from bottle into hand
User: frankileon / Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The State of Michigan has launched a new website to bring information together in one location about opioid addiction and how to get help.

Before, this information was scattered among various state agencies.

US Fish and Wildlife Services

 

Today on Stateside, Michigan's opioid overdoses are at an all-time high. What are we doing wrong in the fight against addiction? Plus, as we celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, we take a look into the work the Michigan History Center is doing to represent a larger group of Michiganders.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.

Overdose deaths continue to rise despite state efforts on opioid crisis

 

Melissa Benmark / Michigan Radio

A pilot project in western Wayne County will offer people struggling with opioid addiction a possible path to recovery.

The Rescue Recovery program will provide people referred from St. Mary Mercy Livonia hospital or one of 18 participating law enforcement agencies with the opportunity to go through specialized detoxification treatment at the hospital.

U.S. Centers for Disease Control

While official data is still coming in, it appears that Michigan’s drug overdose deaths are continuing their upward trajectory since the start of 2017.

According to projections from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control released earlier this month, Michigan saw 2,662 drug-related deaths in 2017.

Melissa Benmark / Michigan Radio

Young people who were prescribed opioids for wisdom tooth extraction have a 2.7-fold increased risk of developing an opioid habit compared to those who were not prescribed opioids. That’s according to a new study from the University of Michigan.

Andrew Jameson / Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Justice Department is adding more prosecutors in Michigan.

U.S. attorneys in Detroit and Grand Rapids say they'll benefit from the government's focus on fighting violent crime. Six are being added in the Eastern District, and four will be hired in the Western District.

Detroit U.S. Attorney Matthew Schneider says his office will use new prosecutors to "keep the residents of Michigan safe." Grand Rapids U.S. Attorney Andrew Birge says the new hires will "make a positive impact" in western Michigan.