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Attorney General Dana Nessel
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel announced Tuesday the results of her office's investigation into three separate incidents of alleged police misconduct involving officers in Jackson, Saginaw and Washtenaw counties.  

Former city of Saginaw police officer Adam Collier, who is white, will face felony charges for allegedly using excessive force during an arrest on July 11. Collier is accused of striking a handcuffed woman, who is Black, with a closed fist, first as she entered his patrol car and later at the jail after she allegedly spat at him. Collier was fired on July 17.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Two Michigan Democratic congresswomen are calling on Republicans in the U.S. Senate to take action on legislation on policing.

Specifically, Representative Debbie Dingell (D-Dearborn) and Representative Brenda Lawrence (D-Southfield) want the Senate to take up the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act.  

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Police departments across the country already submit use of force reports to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Now, departments in Michigan will be encouraged to submit reports for state-specific data.

The Law Enforcement Transparency Collaborative, announced Wednesday, will be the first statewide collection of use of force data.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Activists took to the streets of Eight Mile Road again Wednesday evening to draw attention to the Detroit area’s racial divisions. Eight Mile has long served as a dividing line between predominantly-Black Detroit, and its predominantly-white suburbs.

Organizers say that Black people often fear crossing Eight Mile because it can lead to negative encounters with police. And they say suburban residents often fear crossing Eight Mile because they associate Detroit with violence.

Michigan State Police car
Joe Ross / Flickr - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCl0

Governor Gretchen Whitmer has signed an executive order to expand the commission that sets law enforcement training standards. 

Her order adds the state’s civil rights director to the Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards, which sets rules on licensing and training police officers. Most of them represent law enforcement groups. 

Dustin Dwyer / Michigan Radio

Update: Brian Jennings was arrested by Grand Rapids police Thursday afternoon. The Kent County Prosecutor's office initially told Michigan Radio Jennings was charged with destruction of property separately from the destruction that happened in the downtown core on Saturday night. Since then, Kent County Prosecutor Chris Becker says additional charges have been filed for rioting, breaking and entering and destruction of property at 82 Ionia on Saturday. The Kent County Prosecutors office is located in the building. 

Hundreds of angry people with no leader, and no plan.

A city, and a police department, on edge.

That was Grand Rapids again last night, less than a week after protests downtown turned to destruction and looting.

But last night, things turned out differently.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Training in conflict de-escalation and recognizing bias would be required of all law enforcement officers in Michigan under a bill adopted Thursday by the state Senate. The bill moved quickly as protests against police brutality continue across the state.

wayne county sheriff headquarters exteriors
Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

The Michigan Sheriffs' Association is condemning the Minneapolis Police Department for the death of George Floyd. In a statement posted on its Facebook Monday night, the board of directors for the MSA called the MPD’s actions “bad policing” and said those kinds of actions “will not be accepted or tolerated.”

Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

Washtenaw County Sheriff Jerry Clayton has released body cam videos showing Sha'Teina Grady El fiercely resisting arrest, including biting a deputy on the arm.

Grady El was arrested after she refused to move away from the perimeter of a probable crime scene. Prior to her arrest, Grady El was videotaping deputies investigating a shooting, and advising the occupant of a nearby home that they needed a warrant to enter.

demonstrators holding signs walking down Washtenaw Avenue in Ann arbor MI
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Protests continue in the state and nation following explosive uses of police force against African Americans. Recent documented incidents took place in Minneapolis, where George Floyd was killed after a police officer pushed his knee into Floyd’s neck for several minutes, and in Southeast Michigan, where a Washtenaw County deputy repeatedly punched Sha’Teina Grady El in the head.

Children on a swing set in Detroit's ella fitzgerald park
City of Detroit

 

 

Today on Stateside, the city of Detroit is making efforts to revitalize local neighborhoods by creating new public gathering spaces. Plus, a contemporary strings band is using new techniques to electrify all genres of music.

 

If you've ever been tempted to make a rude gesture at a police officer, you can rest assured that the Constitution protects your right to do so, a federal appeals court says.

Joe Ross / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The Republican majority leader in the Senate, Arlan Meekhof, has introduced legislation that would allow city police departments to contract with a private firm for police officers. They'd have all the authority and the protections given to public police officers. 

Dustin Dwyer / Michigan Radio

The small town of Zeeland could be the latest in Michigan to restructure its police department.

The city has a new fact-finding committee to look at options for the department. The current police chief is set to retire in about a month.

Mayor Kevin Klynstra says the city may be able to save money by making changes to the department.

photo from complaint filed in Brown v. City of Hastings et al

A white police sergeant in the town of Hastings says he faced racial discrimination after a DNA test showed he has African ancestry. 

a police squad car
Flickr user Scott Davidson/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Legislation meant to improve law enforcement hiring practices made it through the state Senate Thursday.

Right now human resource units in police departments are reluctant to tell other departments anything about a former officer besides their name and when they worked for them out of fear of litigation if the officer doesn’t get the job.

Senator Jones says the legislation is meant to prevent bad officers from hopping from department to department. Jones said, “99.9 percent of all officers are the finest people in the world. But once in a while you get a bad apple.”

Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

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Updated January 14, 2019:

In December 2017, then-Governor Rick Snyder passed legislation that removed the exemption that excused police officers who slept with prostitutes while undercover. Michigan was the last state to enact what critics have said is "common sense legislation."

Critics feared the lack of legislation would excuse abuses against human trafficking victims.

Wayne State holds vigil for fallen police officer

Nov 30, 2016
Mourners gather in Gullen Mall, at the center of Wayne State University's campus to pay respects to Officer Collin Rose.
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Thousands of people, including students, faculty and law enforcement officers, stood in the center of Wayne State University’s campus last night. Some were holding candles, others were holding back tears.

All of them gathered to pay their respects to fallen Wayne State Police Officer Collin Rose.

Officer Rose was patrolling the area west of the school’s campus last week when he was shot while trying to arrest a man who was known by campus police to be troublesome.

The suspect was caught hours after the incident. Rose died the following day.

A woman texting on a cell phone.
Public Domain

 

Federal agents recently revealed that the key to tracking down a low-level accused drug dealer in Wayne County was a device that’s been used in the war on terror.

It’s called Stingray, and it helped police track down and arrest suspected drug dealer Daiven Hollinshed of Inkster.

A Michigan State Police file photo.
Michigan State Police

Last year, Michigan tightened requirements for civil asset forfeiture.

That's the law that allows the government to seize property when someone is accused of a crime even if they're not convicted.

This started as part of the war against drugs. It's become a lucrative tool for cash-strapped police departments and prosecutors. 

Laws passed last year require more transparency, but do not abolish civil asset forfeiture. 

taliesin / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

State Senator Mike Kowall plans to introduce legislation called "Uniformed Lives Matter."  

The bills make it a hate crime to assault someone in law enforcement.

It's Kowal's response to the murders of Dallas police officers last week.

Kowall says he doesn't intend to upset people in the "Black Lives Matter" movement.

An Occupy Wall Street protester records police in 2011.
flickr user Paul Stein / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

We likely would not know about the killings of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge or Philando Castile in Minnesota if not for the video recordings. 

In April, MLive published a story that dives into the question of whether police can order you to delete a recording on your phone after you've captured video of a police action.

The story refers to a case in which two of the officers who are accused of beating and falsely arresting the wrong person were undercover. A uniformed officer told people who'd recorded the scene to "delete it for the safety of the officers."

ACLU of Michigan Legal Director Michael Steinberg joined us today to talk generally about whether or not police can order you to delete a recording or seize your phone or camera. 

detroit police car
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio


If you’re a police officer in the United Kingdom, chances are you don’t carry a gun.

In fact, you might go through your entire career and never fire a weapon, a stark contrast to police on this side of the Atlantic.

Michael Matthews is a police constable with the London Metropolitan Police and is now attached to Scotland Yard. He’s just spent time shadowing Detroit police officers, conducting research for a book Matthews is writing about the Detroit Police Department.

2-week trial expected in Inkster police beating case

Oct 29, 2015
City of Inkster sign.
City of Inkster

A  judge says a trial is expected to last about two weeks for a police officer seen on video repeatedly punching a motorist in the head during a suburban Detroit traffic stop.

Jury selection begins Monday in the case of 47-year-old William Melendez and Wayne County Circuit Court Judge Vonda Evans says that's expected to last two days. The Detroit News reports 90 prospective jurors will be impaneled. Opening statements are Wednesday.

Johan Larsson / Creative Commons

Michigan state police have been using cell phone tracking devices for nearly ten years.

That’s according to documents the American Civil Liberties Union obtained through a Freedom of Information request.

flickr user The National Guard / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM


When we talk about post-traumatic stress disorder, the conversation usually focuses on our members of the military, both active-duty and veterans.

But that misses a large group of men and women who struggle with PTSD: our first responders.

taliesin / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Lansing Police Department announced today it will begin a body camera pilot program.

Lansing Police Chief Mike Yankowski says the department has been considering body cameras since 2013.

taliesin / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

A suburban Detroit police officer who repeatedly punched a driver in the head during a traffic stop has been ordered to stand trial on assault charges.

Inkster Judge Sabrina Johnson listened to the victim Thursday and watched police video of the bloody arrest, which occurred in January. The incident wasn't publicly known until WDIV-TV aired the video weeks later.

Michigan State Police

The right-leaning Mackinac Center hosted a forum Wednesday featuring the ACLU and Democratic state representative Jeff Irwin.

“Maybe it’s a little strange to have someone like myself appear at a Mackinac Center event,” Irwin told the crowd gathered, “but I think it actually just speaks to the power of this argument.”

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Oakland County Sheriff Mike Bouchard says politicians in Lansing and Washington are not listening to the needs of law enforcement.

Bouchard says police officers are a popular political target.

“I’m frustrated by the constant peppering of law enforcement from both the Far Right and the Far Left,” says Bouchard. “The Far Right seems to think we’re part of the NSA, and the Far Left wants to disarm us.”

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