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political roundup

rape kits in the foreground and two women blurred in the background
G.L. Kohuth / Michigan State University

 

 

Today on Stateside, ten years after thousands of untested rape kits were found in a Detroit police warehouse, we talk to the prosecutor who’s been working though those cases. Plus, a conversation about climate change and its effect on Michigan agriculture.

 

 

Marijuana plant
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

 

 

Today on Stateside, the use of long-term, uncertified substitute teachers has increased tenfold in the past five years. We talk to the Bridge Magazine reporter who broke this story about what it means for the state's neediest students. Plus, documents from a federal court case offer a rare look at how dark money influences Lansing lawmakers. 

Children on a swing set in Detroit's ella fitzgerald park
City of Detroit

 

 

  

Today on Stateside, the city of Detroit is making efforts to revitalize local neighborhoods by creating new public gathering spaces. Plus, a contemporary strings band is using new techniques to electrify all genres of music.

 

someone writing on a ballot
Michael Dorausch / Flickr, http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

Today on Stateside, we talk to Congresswoman Elissa Slotkin (D-Holly) about what she’s seen during a trip to the U.S.—Mexico border. Plus, a look at what it takes to turn a petition drive into a question on the ballot in Michigan. 

someone filling out a census form in spanish
Didier Doceux / Adobe Stock

 

 

Today on Stateside, we discuss how the Trump administration could still limit non-citizen participation in the 2020 Census, even after dropping its pursuit of a citizenship question. Plus, how the opioid crisis is putting a strain on the resources of county morgues.

 

 

Arch rock on Mackinac Island
Viplav Valluri / Wikimedia Commons / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 

Today on Stateside, we talk to a business leader who wants legal protections for LGBTQ people, and a gay politician who says they are not needed. Plus, an updated system for driverless cars is being tested on the streets of Detroit. Are people ready for them?

Sign that says Flint vehicle city
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 

 

Today on Stateside, Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel comments on the recent dismissal of charges against state officials and others for actions related to the Flint water crisis. Plus, an interview with the writer of an "Afrofuturistic techno choreo-poem" set in 3071 Detroit. 

Looking down on a hand holding an open bottle of prescription drugs.
Sharyn Morrow / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

 

Today on Stateside, a look at how the no-fault auto insurance changes could affect health care. Plus, out-of-pocket drug costs are still rising, and it’s not clear where a solution could come from.

 

Long-term care provider: No-fault changes would ensure your car’s repaired but not necessarily your body

 

 

Annie Spratt / Unsplash

 

Today on Stateside, Attorney General Dana Nessel clashes with the Republican-led legislature on a law that would change the rules on petition drives. Plus, an invasive insect could make its way to Michigan and wreak havoc on crops.

 

 

red and orange tulips in front of windmill in holland michigan
City of Holland

Today on Stateside, Republicans in the Michigan Senate want counties to lose some jail funding if they limit law enforcement from cooperating with federal immigration officials. We get reaction from Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon. Plus, it is the 90th annual Tulip Time festival in Holland. We hear about how tulips came to be a symbol of the city's Dutch heritage.

Antonio Espree
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio


a gargoyle on the corner of a Detroit building
Jeff Morrison

Today on Stateside, the interim president of Michigan State University has publically apologized to survivors of sexual abuse by former MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar. At a Friday meeting, those survivors told the Board of Trustees that apologies aren’t enough. Plus, documenting the architectural creatures that watch over Detroit.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.

Nassar survivors tell MSU trustees that apologies are not enough  

sunset in frankenmuth michigan with bridge and road
goodfreephotos.com


President Ford reads a newspaper in the back of a car
David Hume Kennerly / Courtesy of the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum


Emilio Gutierrez Soto
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, we talk with Congresswoman Debbie Dingell about efforts to halt the deportation of Mexican journalist and University of Michigan Knight-Wallace Fellow Emilio Gutierrez Soto. Plus, we check in with Wayne County Executive Warren Evans about the state of the county's finances.

Listen above for the full show, or find individual segments below.

Political roundup: Unlimited medical benefits, lack of transparency contribute to high auto insurance rates

Wikimedia Commons

Today on Stateside, the priest in charge of processing cases of sexual abuse by clergy in the Detroit diocese responds to state Attorney General Dana Nessel’s call for the Catholic church to stop investigating itself. Plus, the legal gray area around growing – and selling – hemp and its products, including CBD oil.    

a side by side of Dan Kildee and then a river with pfas foam on it
dankildee.house.gov / Lester Graham

Today on Stateside, the EPA on Thursday released a plan to deal with contamination from per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances – better known as PFAS. U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee says the plan shows the agency is “dragging their feet.” Plus, what it’s like to straddle two worlds as the first person in your family to go to college.

person weighing weed on scale
Unsplash

Today on Stateside, Michigan regulators allow unlicensed dispensaries and growers to reopen in midst of a medical marijuana shortage. Plus, a software engineer who traded building software for building kitchen cabinets.

Jocelyn Benson
Benson for Secretary of State

Today on Stateside, the partial government shutdown hit the two week mark today. Is there a compromise in sight? Plus, the EPA reversed a ban on a popular insecticide produced by Michigan-based DowDupont, despite evidence that the EPA based its decision to scrap the ban on misleading science.

band playing
Courtesy of Mike Blank

Today on Stateside, we review the bills headed to Governor Snyder's desk after the lame duck state legislature's all-nighter. Plus, this year marks the 50th consecutive year of a very special Christmas tradition for Stateside producer Mike Blank's family.  

Wikimedia commons

 

Today, where do bills still passing through the Michigan Legislature stand as we head into the final week of the lame-duck session? Plus, we speak to two siblings who were separated in the foster care system. Now, they're fighting for a Sibling Bill of Rights. 

Legislator explains why school grading system is needed

 

Ann Arbor superintendent Jeanice Swift
April Van Buren / Michigan Radio

Today on Stateside, the Michigan legislature has been busy pushing through bills during lame duck. The question is: will Governor Rick Snyder sign them? Plus, how training police to interact with people who have a mental illness or cognitive disability can reduce the chance of a violent encounter. 

example of kinds of missing middle housing stock
Design credit Opticos Design, Inc.

 

Today, we hear from Michigan's newly elected state Senate Majority Leader, Republican Senator Mike Shirkey, about how he plans to work with Governor-elect Gretchen Whitmer. Plus, how zoning laws got rid of "missing middle" housing stock and made cities unaffordable for many working families. 

Listen to the full show above or hear individual segments below. 

Political roundup: As power changes hands in Lansing, what could possibly go wrong?

An example of the modular homes being installed on land bank property in Grand Rapids.
Courtesy of InnovaLab

 

Today, the Michigan Legislature passed a law mandating paid sick leave in September, but they're already making plans to amend it after the midterms. We speak to the leader of the group that created the law. Plus, with the election just four days away, make sure you have the facts on the proposal that would legalize recreational marijuana. 

Jerome Helton and Dre Sangster
April Van Buren / Michigan Radio

 

Today on Stateside, are Democratic candidates paying enough attention to Detroit voters? Plus, we continue our reporting on Emilio Gutierrez-Soto, the Mexican journalist seeking asylum in the U.S. who is facing deportation. 

State agency overseeing funeral homes responds to fetal remains scandal 

Today on Stateside, what are gubernatorial candidates not spending enough time discussing? Our political commentators weigh in. Plus, even in statistically identical neighborhoods, children in Detroit yield disproportionate success rates. 

 

jim abbott pitching
Wikimedia Commons / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Today on Stateside, the director of a conservative advocacy group talks about why he opposes Proposal 2, the anti-gerrymandering ballot initiative. Plus, Flint native Jim Abbott was born without a right hand, but he still made it to the major league. We talk to the director of a new documentary about the baseball legend.

Emilio Gutierrez Soto
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

 

 

Today on Stateside, a conversation with Mexican journliast Emilio Gutierrez-Soto who sought asylum in the US in 2008. He is currently a Knight-Wallace Fellow, but may face deportation under the Trump Administration. Plus, a political-round up, a conversation with a MacArthur genius fellow, and interview with Gubernatorial Candidate Bill Schuette (R).

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.

AcrylicArtist / MorgueFile

 


The Michigan Legislature will return from summer break next week, and Republicans are discussing the potential of adopting two proposals headed to the ballot this November. 

Picture of the Lansing capitol building
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The big news in politics this week was the Republican gubernatorial nominee choosing a running mate.

Attorney General Bill Schuette announced that Kent County Clerk Lisa Posthumus-Lyons would be his lieutenant governor Monday.

To discuss that choice, and all things lieutenant governor, Stateside talked to our Friday political commentators.

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