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protesters

Detroit Will Breathe / via Facebook

Detroit Police Chief James Craig is defending officers’ use of force to break up a protest on Saturday night.

Officers used batons, gas, and other aggressive means to remove protesters gathered in a downtown Detroit intersection. 44 people were arrested.

Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Protesters who have taken to Detroit’s streets in the weeks since George Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis police say Detroit police have brutalized them. Some recounted their stories at a self-styled tribunal on Saturday night.

Person after person gave testimony alleging that Detroit police taunted, pepper sprayed, and assaulted them at marches earlier this month – mostly for violating Detroit’s then-8 p.m. curfew.

Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

Tuesday's rally to inform protesters about what happened in a meeting with Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan got off to a rocky start.

Joanna Underwood, an activist who helped organize the first Detroit protest against police brutality, screamed at, ranted, and angrily lectured the protesters, along with two other activists she accused of "hijacking," the movement she was leading.

Underwood said Tristan Taylor and Nakia Wallace, who'd met with Duggan, were not legitimate leaders of the movement, because they were relatively new to the protest scene, while she'd been working for justice in the city for 15 years.  

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Hundreds of people marched through the streets of the Grosse Pointe communities on Friday to protest police brutality and racial injustice.

The peaceful march up and down Kercheval Avenue was racially mixed. It was organized by youth activists, but included people of all ages.

teacher standing in front of class with large monitor
Steve Riot / Pixabay

Today on Stateside, one sheriff shares what his department has learned about its own biases and discusses if proposed reforms for police departments are enough. Plus, what's on teachers' minds as they look at plans to reopen schools this fall. 

Protestors in Detroit got what they wanted Wednesday night when they were allowed to keep demonstrating past the city’s temporary 8 p.m. curfew, with the support of Police Chief James Craig.

It was a distinctly different attitude from police towards protestors than on Tuesday night, when 127 were arrested for being out too late. Protests against police brutality -- sparked by the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police -- have continued each day in Detroit for nearly a week. 

Detroit Free Press, used with permission

Day five of George Floyd protests in Detroit ended with a mass arrest of protesters.

In the week since Floyd died, as a Minneapolis police officer kneeled on his neck during an arrest, protests have spread across Michigan and the United States.

Chanting “We don’t back down to bullies in shields,” hundreds of protesters linked arms and continued marching past Detroit’s curfew.

an open sign in a shop window
Mike Petrucci / Unsplash

Today on Stateside, we spoke with activists who organized some of this week's protests in Detroit and Grand Rapids. Plus, Governor Whitmer rolled back some significant restrictions on business and gatherings yesterday which was a huge relief for some, but left many with huge gray areas about how commerce and social life will go forward.

(Subscribe to Stateside on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or with this RSS link)

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.

Kate Wells/Michigan Radio

Hundreds of protesters, many of them students and young people, came out to at least two separate marches in Ann Arbor on Tuesday, marking more than a week of nearly daily protests in the city.

 

boarded up store
Courtesy of Chloe Miller / bit.ly/3gQi2Bl

Kalamazoo officials have imposed a 7 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew this evening after violence flared Monday night. Vandals broke windows and started fires. Police used tear gas and other means to disperse the crowd.

Police Chief Karianne Thomas says it was not Kalamazoo’s “finest hour.”

Ryan Patrick Hooper / WDET

Protesters marched for a fourth straight day in Detroit. But for the first time, there were no clashes with police.

Hundreds of demonstrators walked for miles on Monday, holding signs and chanting against police brutality.

Over weekend, similar protests ended with tear gas and arrests.

But Monday, protest organizers, including Stefan Perez, worked to reduce tensions within the group of protesters.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan says the city will continue an 8 p.m. curfew for the next week, after police used tear gas, rubber bullets, and other aggressive measures to break up groups of people violating the curfew in downtown Detroit on Sunday night.

The clashes came as Duggan, Police Chief James Craig, and some of the city’s African American pastors and neighborhood activists asked people to stay off the streets at night, and for people from outside the city to refrain from coming in for after-hours protests sparked by the Minneapolis police killing of George Floyd.

Michigan State Capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Protesters at the Michigan state Capitol this week got plenty of national news media attention and some questions about how things were handled by state authorities.

Much of the nation was astonished that protesters were allowed into the Michigan Capitol armed with rifles and side arms.

It is legal to openly carry a gun in the Capitol.

Protesters hold court in rotunda of state Capitol

Dec 12, 2018
Looking up into the rotunda of the Michigan Capitol.
user cedarbenddrive/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Protesters flooded the rotunda of the Michigan Capitol Wednesday to oppose actions taken by the Legislature during this year’s lame duck session. Protesters gathered for a second week after lawmakers passed legislation modifying measures such as minimum wage and earned sick time.

Bryce Huffman

Update: 8:30 a.m. on Sept. 19

Kalamazoo police officers arrived at Bronson Park this morning to clear the park of homeless people and protestors.

The city imposed a deadline of 7 p.m. Tuesday night for homeless campers to leave the park.

Some people have been arrested, including city commissioner Shannon Sykes.

The Michigan Senate in Lansing.
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio file photo

Police say more than a dozen protesters have been arrested after refusing to leave the rotunda of the Michigan Capitol.

Michigan State Police say in a statement about 125 people were on the floor off the Capitol rotunda Tuesday afternoon and were required to leave the building when it closed at 5 p.m. Police say 19 refused and were arrested for trespassing.

People at a peace vigil at State Capitol
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Peace vigils were held across the state Sunday in solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attack in Charlottesville.

More than two hundred people stood at the state capitol in Lansing. There were also vigils in Detroit, Ann Arbor and Grand Rapids.

Donald Trump tweet
@realDonaldTrump Twitter

As violence erupted in Charlottesville, Virginia this weekend, some of Michigan's lawmakers took to social media.  

President Donald Trump
Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Donald Trump came to Detroit to give a speech. For Michiganders opposed to Trump and what he stands for, it was a chance to speak back. 

Some 300 protestors gathered to chant outside Cobo Center as Trump spoke to the Detroit Economic Club. 

And nearly 20 women took their protest inside, interrupting Trump and eventually getting escorted outside by Secret Service. 

Among those kicked out of Monday's speech was former Democratic State Representative Rashida Tlaib, who was there as a part of Moms Against Trump.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A small group of protesters is greeting people outside of tonight’s Donald Trump event in Birch Run, north of Flint.  

Trump is currently leading polls among Republican presidential candidates. Tonight’s event is sold out.